Research Fellows

Postdoctoral Fellows

Grant Aiton Doctor

Grant Aiton

Before joining ANU, I completed my MSc at the University of Alberta researching Salish and Dene languages, and then received his PhD from James Cook University, where he conducted extensive fieldwork in the Bosavi watershed in Western Province, Papua New Guinea studying the Eibela language. He will continue to research and conduct language documentation and revitalization in indigenous languages of Canada and Papua New Guinea.

Danielle Barth Doctor

Danielle Barth

Danielle Barth has completed her PhD at the University of Oregon where her research has investigated the interface between syntax, phonetics and information theory. In her research she uses empirical data drawn from corpora, experiments and descriptive fieldwork. At the Centre she'll be working on building a multilingual corpus built from data collected by multiple researchers on 12-15 languages from around the world. Her project will focus on finding, describing and comparing inter- and intra-language variation as it relates to the expression of social cognition, using descriptive and quantitative methodologies. She is also looking forward to returning to her fieldsite in Matukar, Papua New Guinea so that Matukar Panau, the language spoken there, can be added to the sample of languages for the social cognition typology project.

Recent Publications

  1. Understanding Corpus Linguistics

    Bibliography

    Danielle Barth, and Stefan Schnell. 2021. Understanding Corpus Linguistics. : Routledge.

  2. Using forced alignment for sociophonetic research on a minority language

    Bibliography

    Danielle Barth, James Grama, Simon Gonzalez, and Catherine Travis. 2020. "Using forced alignment for sociophonetic research on a minority language." University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics. 25 (2): 1-10.

  3. Expression of anaphoric subjects in Vera'a: Functional and structural factors in the choice between pronoun and zero

    Bibliography

    Stefan Schnell, and Danielle Barth. 2020. "Expression of anaphoric subjects in Vera'a: Functional and structural factors in the choice between pronoun and zero." Language Variation and Change. 32 (3): 267-291. doi: 10.1017/S0954394520000125.

  4. Subgrouping the Sogeram languages

    Bibliography

    Danielle Barth, Wolfgang Barth, and Don Daniels. 2019. "Subgrouping the Sogeram languages." Journal of Historical Linguistics. 9 (1): 92-127. doi: 10.1075/jhl.17011.dan.

  5. Variation in Matukar Panau kinship terminology

    Bibliography

    Danielle Barth. 2019. "Variation in Matukar Panau kinship terminology." Asia-Pacific Language Variation. 5 (2): 139-171. doi: 10.1075/aplv.00004.bar.

Rosey Billington Doctor

Rosey Billington

Rosey is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Melbourne. She is currently researching the phonetic and phonological patterns of South Efate, an Oceanic language of Vanuatu, together with CIs Fletcher and Nick Thieberger. As part of the Processing and Shape programs, this project focuses on the correlates of prosodic phenomena such as stress, and the ways that prosodic patterns interact with phonotactic and morphosyntactic structures. For her PhD research, Rosey worked on a phonetically-based description of the phonology of Lopit, an Eastern Nilotic language traditionally spoken in South Sudan. This project included phonetic investigations of vowel contrasts, glides and gemination, and tonal distinctions. Rosey also maintains an interest in the phonetic characteristics of English varieties spoken in Australia.

Recent Publications

  1. A Grammar of Lopit: An Eastern Nilotic Language of South Sudan

    Bibliography

    Jonathan Moodie, and Rosey Billington. 2020. A Grammar of Lopit: An Eastern Nilotic Language of South Sudan. : Brill.

  2. Acoustic evidence for right-edge prominence in Nafsan

    Bibliography

    Rosey Billington, Janet Fletcher, Nick Thieberger, and Ben Volchok. 2020. "Acoustic evidence for right-edge prominence in Nafsan." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 147 (4): 2829-2844. doi: 10.1121/10.0000995.

  3. Prosodic marking of focus in Nafsan

    Bibliography

    Janet Fletcher, Rosey Billington, Nick Thieberger, Sasha Calhoun, Paola Escudero, Marija Tabain, and Paul Warren. 2019. "Prosodic marking of focus in Nafsan". In Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, 3787-3791. Melbourne, Australia.

  4. The /el-/ael/ merger in Australian English: Acoustic and articulatory insights

    Bibliography

    Chloe Diskin, Deborah Loakes, Rosey Billington, Hywel Stoakes, Simon Gonzalez, Sam Kirkham, Sasha Calhoun, Paola Escudero, Marija Tabain, and Paul Warren. 2019. "The /el-/ael/ merger in Australian English: Acoustic and articulatory insights". In Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Melbourne, Australia, 2019, 1764-1768. Melbourne, Australia.

  5. Building capacity for community-led documentation in Erakor, Vanuatu

    Bibliography

    Ana Krajinovic, Rosey Billington, Lionel Emil, Gray Kaltap̃au, and Nick Thieberger. 2019. "Building capacity for community-led documentation in Erakor, Vanuatu". In Human language technologies as a challenge for computer science and linguistics — 2019, 185-189. Poznan, Poland.

Laurence Bruggeman

Laurence Bruggeman

Laurence is a postdoctoral fellow in spoken-language processing at the MARCS Institute (Western Sydney University). She obtained her PhD in psycholinguistics from Western Sydney University 2016, for research investigating first and second language speech processing in Dutch emigrants in Australia. Laurence then spent two years as a postdoctoral researcher in the Child Language Lab at Macquarie University, where she investigated speech processing in children with hearing loss. She joined CoEDL in September 2018 to work with Prof Anne Cutler in the Processing Program.

Recent Publications

  1. Children with hearing loss can predict during sentence processing

    Bibliography

    Rebecca Holt, Laurence Bruggeman, and Katherine Demuth. 2021. "Children with hearing loss can predict during sentence processing." Cognition. 212: 104684. doi: doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2021.104684.

  2. Temporal cues to onset voicing contrasts in Australian English-speaking children

    Bibliography

    Julien Millasseau, Laurence Bruggeman, Ivan Yuen, and Katherine Demuth. 2021. "Temporal cues to onset voicing contrasts in Australian English-speaking children." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 149: 348-356. doi: 10.1121/10.0003060.

  3. Acoustic cues to coda stop voicing contrasts in Australian English-speaking children

    Bibliography

    Julian Millasseau, Ivan Yuen, Laurence Bruggeman, and Katherine Demuth. 2021. "Acoustic cues to coda stop voicing contrasts in Australian English-speaking children." Journal of Child Language. 48 (2): 1-19. doi: 10.1017/S0305000920000781.

  4. Visual speech cues speed processing and reduce effort for children listening in quiet and noise

    Bibliography

    Rebecca Holt, Laurence Bruggeman, and Katherine Demuth. 2020. "Visual speech cues speed processing and reduce effort for children listening in quiet and noise." Applied Psycholinguistics. 41 (4): 933-961. doi: 10.1017/S0142716420000302.

  5. No L1 privilege in talker adaptation

    Bibliography

    Laurence Bruggeman, and Anne Cutler. 2019. "No L1 privilege in talker adaptation." Bilingualism: Language and Cognition. 23 (3): 681-693. doi: 10.1017/S1366728919000646.

Matthew Carroll Doctor

Matthew Carroll

Prior to commencing at the Centre with an ELDP funded postdoctoral fellow position, I was hosted as a Newton International Fellow at the Surrey Morphology Group where I retain visitor status. I research the boundary between redundant and distributed structures in the architecture of language. My research is grounded in traditional qualitative linguistics (typology and description) using mathematical and formal models to make explicit the assumptions and practices of these approaches. I research language from an evolutionary perspective in which grammar is an emergent property of broader cognitive principles. Linguistics is fundamentally an empirical endeavour and I work with data primarily drawn firsthand from fieldwork in the region east of Merauke in West Papua (Indonesian Papua), specifically the Yam language groups of Kanum and Yei.

Recent Publications

  1. Phonetics and Phonology of Ngkolmpu

    Bibliography

    Carroll, Matthew. 2021. "Phonetics and Phonology of Ngkolmpu". In Phonetic fieldwork in Southern New Guinea, 33-52. University of Hawaii Press.

  2. Discontinuous noun phrases in Ngkolmpu

    Bibliography

    Matthew Carroll. 2020. "Discontinuous noun phrases in Ngkolmpu." Studies in language. 44 (3): 700-721. doi: 10.1075/sl.19015.car.

  3. The Morphology of Yam Languages

    Bibliography

    Carroll, Matthew. 2020. "The Morphology of Yam Languages". In Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Linguistics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  4. The languages of Southern New Guinea

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas, Arka, Wayan, Carroll, Matthew, Choi, Yun Jung, Döhler, Christian, Gast, Volker, Kashima, Eri, Mittag, Emil, Olsson, Bruno, Quinn, Kyla, Schokkin, Dineke, Tama, Philip, Tongeren, Charlotte van, Siegel, Jeff, and Palmer, Bill. 2018. "The languages of Southern New Guinea". In The Languages and Linguistics of the New Guinea Area, 641–774. De Gruyter.

  5. The languages of Southern New Guinea

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas, Arka, Wayan, Carroll, Matthew, Dohler, Christian, Kashima, Eri, Mittag, Emil, Gast, Volker, Schokkin, Dineke, Quinn, Kyla, Tama, Philip, Van Tongeren, Charlotte, Olsson, Bruno, and Siegel, Jeff. 2017. "The languages of Southern New Guinea". In The Languages and Linguistics of New Guinea: A Comprehensive Guide, 641-774. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

Justin d'Ambrosio Doctor

Justin d'Ambrosio

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Evolution
  • Institution: The Australian National University

Commencing with CoEDL in 2021

Lucinda Davidson Doctor

Lucinda Davidson

Lucy is a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Melbourne, whose primary interests lie in the development of language use by children, specifically Indigenous children in Australia. For her PhD (through the ARC funded project, Language Acquisition in Murrinhpatha (LAMP), based at the University of Melbourne), Lucy explored the linguistic and sociocultural understandings of children aged 3 to 7 who are learning the traditional Australian language, Murrinhpatha, as their first language. In her current position she continues to work with Murrinhpatha speakers at Wadeye, NT, with Dr Barbara Kelly and Prof Gillian Wigglesworth, on their project investigating children’s acquisition of narratives. Lucy is also conducting research with Pitjantjatjara speaking children in the remote community of Pipalyatjara, SA, the focus of which is children’s development of nominal case marking.

Recent Publications

  1. Language Contact and Change through Child First Language Acquisition

    Bibliography

    O'Shannessy, Carmel, Davidson, Lucinda, and Hickey, Raymond. 2020. "Language Contact and Change through Child First Language Acquisition". In The Handbook of Language Contact, 67-91. John Wiley & Sons Ltd..

  2. Allies and adversaries: categories in Murrinhpatha speaking children's talk

    Bibliography

    Lucinda Davidson. 2018. Allies and adversaries: categories in Murrinhpatha speaking children's talk. Melbourne : University of Melbourne PhD Thesis.

  3. The acquisition of Murrinhpatha (Northern Australia)

    Bibliography

    Forshaw, William, Davidson, Lucinda, Kelly, Barbara, Nordlinger, Rachel, Wigglesworth, Gillian, and Blythe, Joseph. 2017. "The acquisition of Murrinhpatha (Northern Australia)". In The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis, 473-494. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  4. In press: Input and Child Directed Speech in Australian Aboriginal Communities

    Bibliography

    Davidson, Lucinda, Kelly, Barbara, Wigglesworth, Gillian, and Nordlinger, Rachel. "In press: Input and Child Directed Speech in Australian Aboriginal Communities". In Handbook of Australian Languages, OUP.

Rebecca Defina Doctor

Rebecca Defina

Rebecca joins the Centre from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen. For her PhD there, she investigated relationships between linguistic and conceptual event representations, with a particular focus on serial verb constructions in Avatime (a Kwa language spoken in Ghana). Her research incorporated a range of methods including linguistic description, gesture analysis, and behavioural experiments in order to study the relationships between language and thought within different ways of thinking.

She is now carrying out a longitudinal study of acquisition in Pitjantjatjara. For this project, she will be developing a corpus of naturalistic language use and narratives from children and their caregivers. She will also be continuing her work on event segmentation, looking at how Pitjantjatjara children learn to use complex predicates and how the alignment between syntactic, gestural, and conceptual event units develops.

Recent Publications

  1. They Talk Muṯumuṯu: Variable Elision of Tense Suffixes in Contemporary Pitjantjatjara

    Bibliography

    Sasha Wilmoth, Rebecca Defina, and Deborah Loakes. 2021. "They Talk Muṯumuṯu: Variable Elision of Tense Suffixes in Contemporary Pitjantjatjara." Languages. 6 (2) doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/languages6020069.

  2. Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara to English Dictionary

    Bibliography

    Cliff Goddard, and Rebecca Defina. 2020. Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara to English Dictionary. Alice Springs : IAD Press.

  3. Acquisition of clause chains in Pitjantjatjara

    Bibliography

    Rebecca Defina. 2020. "Acquisition of clause chains in Pitjantjatjara." Frontiers in Psychology. 11: 541. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.00541.

  4. Pitjantjatjara language change: some observations and recommendations

    Bibliography

    Makinti Minutjukur, Katrina Tjitayi, Umatji Tjitayi, and Rebecca Defina. 2019. "Pitjantjatjara language change: some observations and recommendations." Australian Aboriginal Studies. (1): 82-91.

  5. Tense, aspect, and mood in Avatime

    Bibliography

    Rebecca Defina. 2018. "Tense, aspect, and mood in Avatime." Afrika und Übersee. 92 (1): 65-97.

Seamus Donnelly Doctor

Seamus Donnelly

Seamus received his PhD in Educational Psychology from the City University of New York in 2016. His dissertation research was a meta-analysis of studies comparing monolinguals and bilinguals on executive control tasks. He came to CoeDL to work under the supervision of Dr. Evan Kidd on the Canberra Longitudinal Child Language Project. His current research interests include usage-based approaches to the study of language acquisition and statistical methods for analyzing longitudinal and eye-tracking data.

Recent Publications

  1. The Longitudinal Relationship Between Conversational Turn-Taking and Vocabulary Growth in Early Language Development

    Bibliography

    Seamus Donnelly, and Evan Kidd. 2021. "The Longitudinal Relationship Between Conversational Turn-Taking and Vocabulary Growth in Early Language Development." Child Development. 00 (0): 1-17. doi: 10.1111/cdev.13511.

  2. Individual Differences in First Language Acquisition

    Bibliography

    Evan Kidd, and Seamus Donnelly. 2020. "Individual Differences in First Language Acquisition." Annual Review of Linguistics. 6: 319-340. doi: 10.1146/annurev-linguistics-011619-030326.

  3. Individual differences in lexical processing efficiency and vocabulary in toddlers: A longitudinal investigation

    Bibliography

    Seamus Donnelly, and Evan Kidd. 2020. "Individual differences in lexical processing efficiency and vocabulary in toddlers: A longitudinal investigation." Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 192: 104781. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2019.104781.

  4. Individual differences in first language acquisition and their theoretical implications

    Bibliography

    Kidd, Evan, Bidgood, Amy, Donnelly, Seamus, Durrant, Samantha, Peter, Michelle, Rowland, Caroline, Rowland, Caroline, Theakston, Anna, Ambridge, Ben, and Twomey, Katherine. 2020. "Individual differences in first language acquisition and their theoretical implications". In Current Perspectives on Child Language Acquisition, 189-219. John Benjamins.

  5. The longitudinal relationship between conversational turn-taking and vocabulary growth in early language development

    Bibliography

    Seamus Donnelly, and Evan Kidd. 2020. "The longitudinal relationship between conversational turn-taking and vocabulary growth in early language development." Child Development. 92 (2): 609-625. doi: 10.1111/cdev.13511.

Gabriela Garrido Rodriguez Doctor

Gabriela Garrido Rodriguez

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Gabriela Garrido is interested in the effects of typological variation on language processing. She did her PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (Nijmegen, the Netherlands), where she investigated anticipatory sentence comprehension in Tseltal, a verb-initial Mayan language spoken in Chiapas, Mexico. She is now working with Rachel Nordlinger and Evan Kidd at the School of Languages and Linguistics (the University of Melbourne) on a project that focuses on processing word order in two Australian Indigenous languages (Murrinhpatha and Pitjantjatjara). This project uses eye-tracking methodology to determine how speakers of free word order languages process variable word orders during production and comprehension.

Clair Hill Doctor

Clair Hill

Clair Hill is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Western Sydney University. She has special interest and expertise in Australian languages, particularly those of north-eastern Cape York Peninsula. For her PhD research (MPI Nijmegen and University of Leuven), Clair investigated the organisation a highly interactive mode of multi-party storytelling employed by Umpila and Kuuku Ya’u speakers. Her work has also involved team-based collaborative projects on cross-cultural variation in semantics and interaction, language documentation and language revitalisation, and translating research into useful language learning products with the community. In her current position within CoEDL, Clair will work with CI Caroline Jones on early language development in Australian language settings.

Jacki Liddle Doctor

Jacki Liddle

Jacki Liddle is a postdoctoral research fellow and occupational therapist researching quality of life, participation and life transitions. She uses innovative technology, along with qualitative and quantitative research methods to investigate the needs and experiences of people living with neurological conditions (Parkinson's disease, dementia, stroke), older people and their caregivers, and develop approaches to improve outcomes.

Her research has focussed on the experiences of life transitions related to ageing (for example, driving cessation of older people), illness, and related treatments (for example, deep brain stimulation). Developing technology to measure outcomes including quality of life, wellbeing, time use, and activity and role participation has led to new approaches of monitoring community life and impact of treatments. Researching the experiences related to retirement from driving for older people during her PhD led to the development of the UQDRIVE program, now called CarFreeMe for older drivers, people with dementia and people with traumatic brain injury. A telehealth trial of the the CarFreeMe program is currently underway.​

Jacki is currently working on the Florence Project with a focus on the lived experience of people living with dementia and their conversation partners, and how to facilitate a co-development approach to communication technology with people living with dementia.

Recent Publications

  1. Staying engaged: experiences and opportunities for diverse populations to age well in Australia

    Bibliography

    Liddle, Jacki, and Pachana, Nancy. 2021. "Staying engaged: experiences and opportunities for diverse populations to age well in Australia". In Handbook of active ageing and quality of life: from concepts to applications, 1-36. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

  2. An Automated Approach to Examining Pausing in the Speech of People With Dementia

    Bibliography

    Rachel A. Sluis, Daniel Angus, Janet Wiles, Andrew Back, Ting Ting Gibson, Jacki Liddle, Peter Worthy, David Copland, and Anthony J. Angwin. 2020. "An Automated Approach to Examining Pausing in the Speech of People With Dementia." American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias. 35: 1-8. doi: 10.1177/1533317520939773.

  3. The Challenges of Designing a Robot for a Satisfaction Survey: Surveying Humans Using a Social Robot

    Bibliography

    Scott Heath, Jacki Liddle, and Janet Wiles. 2019. "The Challenges of Designing a Robot for a Satisfaction Survey: Surveying Humans Using a Social Robot." International Journal of Social Robotics. 12: 519–533. doi: 10.1007/s12369-019-00604-0.

  4. Investigating Evolving Current Practices with Mixing Quantitative with Qualitative Methods

    Bibliography

    Ann Morrison, Tamara Heck, Jacki Liddle, and Sabiha Ghellal. 2018. "Investigating Evolving Current Practices with Mixing Quantitative with Qualitative Methods". Sydney, Australia.

  5. There is moderate evidence that the process of service delivery for assistive technology relates to client satisfaction with the technology

    Bibliography

    Jacki Liddle, and Zoe du Cann. 2018. "There is moderate evidence that the process of service delivery for assistive technology relates to client satisfaction with the technology." Australian Occupational Therapy Journal. 65 (3): 243-244. doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.12480.

Bruno Olsson Doctor

Bruno Olsson

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Evolution
  • Institution: The Australian National University

Bruno's postdoctoral research project focuses on the development and typology of Papuan languages, with special attention to the languages of the Anim family in Southern New Guinea. For his PhD at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, Bruno carried out extensive documentation of Coastal Marind, an Anim language that displays a wealth of typologically interesting features, and his current work on related Anim languages aims to shed light on the processes that led to this language family being so different from other Papuan languages. Bruno is also planning to investigate the broader typological characteristics of Papuan languages, partly by using cross-linguistic databases.

Recent Publications

  1. Petrus Drabbe's Coastal Marind texts. Part II: Text in the Far Western Dialect

    Bibliography

    Bruno Olsson. 2021. Petrus Drabbe's Coastal Marind texts. Part II: Text in the Far Western Dialect. : LSPNG.

  2. A Grammar of Coastal Marind

    Bibliography

    Bruno Olsson. 2021. A Grammar of Coastal Marind. : De Gruyter Mouton.

  3. Petrus Drabbe's Coastal Marind texts. Part I: Texts in the Eastern Dialect

    Bibliography

    Bruno Olsson. 2021. Petrus Drabbe's Coastal Marind texts. Part I: Texts in the Eastern Dialect. : LSPNG.

  4. The gender system of Coastal Marind

    Bibliography

    Olsson, Bruno. 2019. "The gender system of Coastal Marind". In Grammatical gender and linguistic complexity I: General issues and specific studies, 197-223. Berlin, Germany: Language Science Press.

  5. Introduction

    Bibliography

    Di Garbo, Francesca, Olsson, Bruno, and Walchli, Bernhard. 2019. "Introduction". In Grammatical gender and linguistic complexity I: General issues and specific studies, 1-12. Berlin, Germany: Language Science Press.

Mark Richards Doctor

Mark Richards

Dr Mark Richards is a researcher within the Speech and Language program in MARCS. He has many years' experience as a language teacher (French, Latin and TESOL) in the primary, secondary and adult education sectors. His most recent role was Head of Languages at Meriden (2007-2015). He completed an M.PHIl in linguistics at the University of Sydney in 1994. The project centred on the development of a learners' grammar and language teaching resources for Mangarrayi, in collaboration with members of the Jilkminggan community in the Roper river region of the Northern Territory. He undertook a PhD at MARCS between 2016 and 2019, and again collaborated with the Jilkminggan community to investigate the use of archival audio recordings to support revitalisation of Mangarrayi.

Recent Publications

  1. Matjarr Djuyal: How Using Gesture in Teaching Gathang Helps Preschoolers Learn Nouns.

    Bibliography

    Anjilkurri Radley, Caroline Jones, Jose Hanham, and Mark Richards. 2021. "Matjarr Djuyal: How Using Gesture in Teaching Gathang Helps Preschoolers Learn Nouns.." Languages. 6 (2) doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/languages6020103.

  2. Matjarr Djuyal: How Using Gesture in Teaching Gathang Helps Preschoolers Learn Nouns

    Bibliography

    Anjilkurri Radley, Caroline Jones, Jose Hanham, and Mark Richards. 2021. "Matjarr Djuyal: How Using Gesture in Teaching Gathang Helps Preschoolers Learn Nouns." Languages. 6 (2) doi: 10.3390/languages6020103.

  3. Revitalisation of Mangarrayi: Supporting community use of archival audio exemplars for creation of language learning resources

    Bibliography

    Mark Richards, Caroline Jones, Francesca Merlan, and Jennifer MacRitchie. 2019. "Revitalisation of Mangarrayi: Supporting community use of archival audio exemplars for creation of language learning resources." Language Documentation & Conservation. 13: 253–280. doi: 10125/24865.

  4. Revitalisation of an Australian Aboriginal Language: Archival Utterances as Scaffolding for Independent Adult Language Learning

    Bibliography

    Mark Richards. 2019. Revitalisation of an Australian Aboriginal Language: Archival Utterances as Scaffolding for Independent Adult Language Learning. Sydney, NSW : Western Sydney University PhD Thesis.

  5. Repurposing archival audio materials for language revitalisation in an Aboriginal community

    Bibliography

    Mark Richards, and Josephine Lardy. 2019. "Repurposing archival audio materials for language revitalisation in an Aboriginal community." Babel. 54 (1/2): 41-45.

Luis Miguel Rojas-Berscia Doctor

Luis Miguel Rojas-Berscia

Luis commenced with the Centre at our UQ Node in mid-September 2018. Luis attained his PhD within the Language in Interaction Research Consortium (currently located at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, The Netherlands). His research was from two main axes: linguistic theory and grammatical description.

Recent Publications

  1. Pre-Historical Language Contact in Peruvian Amazonia. A dynamic approach to Shawi (Kawapanan)

    Bibliography

    Luis Miguel Rojas-Berscia. 2021. Pre-Historical Language Contact in Peruvian Amazonia. A dynamic approach to Shawi (Kawapanan). : John Benjamins.

  2. Distinção ternária de número e concordância em línguas Jê Centrais (Macro-Jê)

    Bibliography

    Cabra, Ana Suelly Arruda Câmara, Xavante, Eliseu Waduipi, Rojas-Berscia, Luis Miguel, and Maxwell, Miranda. 2020. "Distinção ternária de número e concordância em línguas Jê Centrais (Macro-Jê)". In Línguas e Culturas Macro-Jê: Saberes entrecuzados, 353-392. Barra do Garças: UFMT/GEDELLI.

  3. The Chachapuya language and Proto-Kawapanan: lexical affinities and hypothetical contact scenarios

    Bibliography

    Luis Miguel Rojas-Berscia. 2020. "The Chachapuya language and Proto-Kawapanan: lexical affinities and hypothetical contact scenarios." Indiana. 37 (1): 155-188. doi: 10.18441/ind.v37i1.155-188.

  4. Shawi (Chayahuita)

    Bibliography

    Luis Miguel Rojas-Berscia, Andrés Napurí, and Lei Wang. 2020. "Shawi (Chayahuita)." Journal of the International Phonetic Association. 50 (3): 417-430. doi: 10.1017/S0025100318000415.

  5. Mixing and semantic transparency in the genesis of Yilan Japanese

    Bibliography

    Rojas-Berscia, Luis Miguel, Smith, Norval, Veenstra, Tonjes, and Aboh, Enoch Oladé. 2020. "Mixing and semantic transparency in the genesis of Yilan Japanese". In Advances in Contact Linguistics: In hour of Pieter Muysken, 262-282. John Benjamins.

Research Associates

Inge Kral Doctor

Inge Kral

Inge is a linguistic anthropologist working with Jennifer Green and Jane Simpson on Elizabeth Ellis’ ARC Discovery Indigenous Award investigating Western Desert speech styles and verbal arts in the Ngaanyatjarra Lands region of Western Australia. Co-affiliated with the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR-ANU) Inge draws on some thirty years experience in Indigenous education, language and literacy in remote Australia. As an ethnographer of language and literacy her research interests include literacy as social practice; adolescent language socialisation; out-of-school learning; and youth, digital media and new literacies. She recently completed an ARC DECRA researching changing modes of communication and the socio-cultural and linguistic consequences of digital technologies in remote Indigenous Australia. Current projects include ‘Getting in Touch: Language and digital inclusion in Australian Indigenous communities’ and a youth media and literacy project in an Orang Asli indigenous village in Peninsular Malaysia.

Recent Publications

  1. In the Time of their Lives

    Bibliography

    Inge Kral, and Elizabeth Ellis. 2020. In the Time of their Lives. Perth : UWA Publishing.

  2. Digital drawings from the desert

    Bibliography

    Green, Jennifer, Kral, Inge, Ellis, Elizabeth, Kral, Inge, and Green, Jennifer. 2020. "Digital drawings from the desert". In i-Tjuma Ngaanyatjarra stories from the Western Desert of Central Australia, 6-21. Perth: UWA Press.

  3. i-Tjuma: Ngaanyatjarra Stories from the Western Desert of Central Australia

    Bibliography

    Jennifer Green, Elizabeth Ellis, and Inge Kral. 2020. i-Tjuma: Ngaanyatjarra Stories from the Western Desert of Central Australia. Perth : UWA Publishing.

  4. Mara Yurriku: Western Desert Sign Languages

    Bibliography

    Elizabeth Marrkilyi Ellis, Jennifer Green, Inge Kral, and Lauren Reed. 2019. "Mara Yurriku: Western Desert Sign Languages." Australian Aboriginal Studies. 2: 89-111. doi: 1885/216033.

  5. Language vitality in and out of school in a remote Indigenous Australian context

    Bibliography

    Kral, Inge, and Ellis, Elizabeth. 2019. "Language vitality in and out of school in a remote Indigenous Australian context". In A World of Indigenous Languages—Politics, Pedagogies, and Prospects for Language Revitalization and Maintenance, Bristol: Multilingual Matters.

Doug Marmion Doctor

Doug Marmion

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: AIATSIS

Originally from Perth, Doug worked as a teacher at Yirara College (a residential school for secondary age Aboriginal children from remote communities) in Alice Springs, followed by three years as Adult Educator for the community of Walungurru (also known as Kintyre) 400 kms west of Alice Springs. While in Central Australia he began learning the Western Desert Language and studying linguistics, which eventually led to him taking up the position of Senior Linguist at the Yamaji Language Centre in Geraldton, Western Australia. In this position he worked with speakers of various languages of the Murchison-Gascoyne region (including Wajarri, Badimaya, Nhanda, Malgana, Warriyangka, Ngarlawangka and Wanmala) to document those languages from the remaining speakers and develop strategies for their maintenance and revival.

Following this Doug completed a PhD in linguistics at the Australian National University with a description of Wutung, a complex, tonal Papuan language and member of the Skou language family, spoken on the north-west coast of Papua New Guinea.

Doug joined AIATSIS in 2010 as the Linguistics Research Fellow. Doug’s primary research interests are across the areas of Indigenous language description, documentation and revitalisation in Australia. He is presently working with the Ngunawal community of Canberra on the revival of their language and has continuing interests in the documentation of the Western Australian languages Ngajumaya, and Wajarri, and the historical linguistics of the Kartu subgroup of languages.

Doug was co-author of both the first (2005) and second (2014) National Indigenous Language Surveys and is one of the lead authors of the Curriculum Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages.

Doug’s work for the Centre of Excellence is focused on the AIATSIS archives and drawing on language materials held there to construct corpora of Australian languages.

Recent Publications

  1. Paper and Talk: the Australian Breath of Life Pilot Project

    Bibliography

    Doug Marmion, Alexandra Andriolo, Kylie Simpson, Emma Murphy, Amy Parncutt, and Alice Gaby. 2020. "Paper and Talk: the Australian Breath of Life Pilot Project". In Proceedings of the 23rd annual conference of the Foundation for Endangered Languages, Sydney, Australia.

David Wilkins Doctor

David Wilkins

David Wilkins is an anthropological linguist who explores the relationship between language use, culture and cognition. His publications range across lexical semantics, pragmatics, semantic change, gesture, aphasia and augmentative and alternative communication. He has done fieldwork in central Australia and Far North Queensland. In the area of documentary and descriptive linguistics, he is currently working to show how and why the current model of grammar, dictionary and texts needs to be complemented by a grammar of language use, an ethno-thesaurus, an ethnography of speaking and an account of a community's paralinguistic repertoire and the interface of language with other culturally available semiotic systems.

Recent Publications

  1. With or Without Speech: Arandic Sign Language from Central Australia

    Bibliography

    Jennifer Green, and David Wilkins. April 3, 2014. "With or Without Speech: Arandic Sign Language from Central Australia." Australian Journal of Linguistics. 34 (2): 234-261. doi: 10.1080/07268602.2014.887407.

  2. Private Interests and Problem Frames in Social Policy Reform: A corpus-assisted critical discourse analytical study

    Bibliography

    Gabrielle Meagher, and David Wilkins. 2018. "Private Interests and Problem Frames in Social Policy Reform: A corpus-assisted critical discourse analytical study." Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis across Disciplines. 10 (2): 1-29.

  3. The Demonstrative Questionnaire: “THIS” and “THAT” in Comparative Perspective

    Bibliography

    Wilkins, David. 2018. "The Demonstrative Questionnaire: “THIS” and “THAT” in Comparative Perspective". In Demonstratives in Cross-Linguistic Perspective, 43-71. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  4. The representation of the national quality framework in the Australian print media: silences and slants in the mediatisation of early childhood education policy

    Bibliography

    Marianne Fenech, and David Wilkins. 2018. "The representation of the national quality framework in the Australian print media: silences and slants in the mediatisation of early childhood education policy." Journal of Education Policy. 34 (6) doi: 10.1080/02680939.2018.1502815.

  5. Arandic alternate sign language(s)

    Bibliography

    Green, Jennifer, Wilkins, David, Jepson, Julie Bakken, de Clerck, Goedele, Lutalo-Kiingi, Sam, and McGregor, William B. 2015. "Arandic alternate sign language(s)". In Sign languages of the world: A comparative handbook, 843-870. De Gruyter Mouton.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University