Submitted theses 2018

Thesis: Semantic scaffolding: the co-construction of visualization meaning through reader experience

Lydia Byrne

PhD: Lydia Byrne

Submission year: 2018

Supervisors: Daniel Angus & Janet Wiles

CoEDL node: University of Queensland

CoEDL program: Technology

Abstract:

This thesis is an investigation of the sound system of Lopit, an Eastern Nilotic (Nilo-Saharan) language traditionally spoken in South Sudan. The primary aim of this study is to develop a phonetically-based description of aspects of Lopit segmental and tonal phonology, with a focus on the Dorik variety of the language.

 
 

Thesis: Allies and adversaries: categories in Murrinhpatha speaking children's talk

Lucinda Davidson

PhD: Lucinda Davidson

Submission year: 2018

Supervisors: Gillian Wigglesworth, Barbara Kelly, Rachel Nordlinger & Joe Blythe

CoEDL node: University of Melbourne

CoEDL program: Learning

Abstract:

This thesis investigates the linguistic and cultural resources that eight Indigenous children draw on when they pursue affiliative and disaffiliative actions in talk with peers. These children are L1 speakers of Murrinhpatha, a traditional Australian language spoken in and around the remote Aboriginal community of Wadeye, in the north of Australia. Just as the linguistic context these children are growing up in is unique, so is their sociocultural context. While increasingly informed by Western culture, Murrinhpatha speaking society at Wadeye is still to a large degree organised around traditional Aboriginal identity categories, involving connections to ‘country’ and ‘totem’, as well as more universal categories such as gender.

 
 

Thesis: Nominal and pronominal morphology of Ngardi: A Ngumpin-Yapa language of Western Australia

Thomas Ennever

MPhil: Thomas Ennever

Submission year: 2018

Supervisors: Felicity Meakins & Mary Laughren

CoEDL node: University of Queensland

CoEDL program: Evolution

Abstract:

This thesis is a comprehensive analysis of the nominal and pronominal morphology of Ngardi, an endangered Pama-Nyungan language of the Ngumpin-Yapa subgroup spoken in the western regions of the Tanami Desert in Western Australia. On the basis of the author’s 2016–2017 recordings of grammatical elicitation and narratives and pre-existing legacy materials of Lee Cataldi, Tom Green and Tasaku Tsunoda; this thesis provides a detailed analysis of two core aspects of the Ngardi grammatical system: nominal case morphology and subclasses (Chapters 2 and 3); and the complex system of pronominal clitics (Chapter 4). The culmination of these three chapters is a unified analysis of the interaction of the nominal and pronominal systems and their role in Ngardi morphosyntax. 

Open access: https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:6a962d8

 

Thesis: A description of the rhythm of Barunga Kriol using rhythm metrics and an analysis of vowel reduction

MPhil: Amit German

Amit German

Submission year: 2018

Supervisors: Caroline Jones, Rachel Hendery, Ann Burchfield & Vincent Aubanel

CoEDL node: Western Sydney University

CoEDL program: Learning

Abstract:

Kriol is an English-lexifier creole language spoken by over 20,000 children and adults in the Northern parts of Australia, yet much about the prosody of this language remains unknown. This thesis provides a preliminary description of the rhythm and patterns of vowel reduction of Barunga Kriol - a variety of Kriol local to Barunga Community, NT – and compares it to a relatively standard variety of Australian English. The thesis is divided into two studies. Study 1, the Rhythm Metric Study, describes the rhythm of Barunga Kriol and Australian English using rhythm metrics. Study 2, the Vowel Reduction Study, compared patterns of vowel reduction in Barunga Kriol and Australian English. This thesis contributes the first in depth studies of vowel reduction patterns and rhythm using rhythm metrics in any variety of Kriol or Australian English. The research also sets an adult baseline for metric results and patterns of vowel reduction for Barunga Kriol and Australian English, useful for future studies of child speech in these varieties. As rhythm is a major contributor to intelligibility, the findings of this thesis have the potential to inform teaching practice in English as a Second Language.

Open access: https://researchdirect.westernsydney.edu.au/islandora/object/uws%3A50582

 

Thesis: Inspired by nature: timescale-free and grid-free event-based computing with spiking neural networks

Amy Gibson

PhD: Ting Ting Amy Gibson

Submission year: 2018

Supervisors: Janet Wiles & Ola Olsson

CoEDL node: University of Queensland

CoEDL program: Technology

Abstract:

Computer vision is enjoying huge success in visual processing applications such as facial recognition,
object identification, and navigation. Most of these studies work with traditional cameras which produce frames at predetermined fixed time intervals. Real life visual stimuli are, however, generated when changes occur in the environment and are irregular in timing. Biological visual neural systems operate on these changes and are hence free from any fixed timescales that are related to the timing of events in visual input.

Inspired by biological systems, neuromorphic devices provide a new way to record visual data. These devices typically have parallel arrays of sensors which operate asynchronously. They have particular potential for robotics due to their low latency, efficient use of bandwidth and low power requirements. There are a variety of neuromorphic devices for detecting different sensory information; this thesis focuses on using the Dynamic Vision Sensor (DVS) for visual data collection.

Open access: https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:298c623

 

Thesis: Verbal morphology and syntax of Mudburra: an Australian Aboriginal language of the Northern Territory

David Osgarby

MPhil: David Osgarby

Submission year: 2018

Supervisors: Rob Pensalfini & Felicity Meakins

CoEDL node: University of Queensland

CoEDL program: Evolution & Shape

Abstract:

MPhil thesis described the verbal morphology and syntax of Mudburra, a neighbouring but unrelated Aboriginal language also spoken in the Northern Territory.

Open access: https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:ce2247a

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University