PhD Students

Samuel Armstrong

Samuel Armstrong

Zurab Baratashvili

Zurab Baratashvili

Commenced March 2019

Recent Publications

  1. A descriptive account of agentless constructions in Sylheti: passive, impersonal, and anticausative

    Bibliography

    E. Marie Thaut, Andriana Koumbarou, and Zurab Baratashvili. 2020. "A descriptive account of agentless constructions in Sylheti: passive, impersonal, and anticausative." Language Documentation and Description. 18 (1): 112-134.

  2. The Types of the Causative Construction in Georgian

    Bibliography

    Zurab Baratashvili. 2019. "The Types of the Causative Construction in Georgian." Bulletin of the Georgian National Academy of Sciences. 13 (1): 126-136.

Katie Bicevskis

Katie Bicevskis

  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Katie Bicevskis completed a BA (Visual) at ANU in 2001 a Graduate (2010) and Post Graduate (2012) Diploma in Linguistics at the University of Melbourne. Her Post Graduate Diploma thesis examined incorporation of modifiers in the Gunwinyguan languages of the Northern Territory. She also completed an MA in Linguistics at the University of British Columbia in 2015 and for her MA thesis she conducted experimental research into the integration of visual and tactile speech information in speech perception. During her time in Canada she also worked on Gitksan, an endangered language of the Tsimshianic family traditionally spoken in northwestern British Columbia. Katie has recently begun her PhD at the University of Melbourne and is working on a grammar of Marri Ngarr, an endangered Australian language of the Daly River region in the Northern Territory.

Emma Browne

Emma Browne

Topic: Language acquisition, negotiation and use in multilingual classrooms of a bilingual school in remote central Australia

Supervisors: Carmel O’Shannessy, Jane Simpson and Samantha Disbray

Emma Browne commenced her PhD candidature at ANU in July 2017. Her experience working in schools in the Northern Territory and an interest in Warlpiri language, child language acquisition and contact varieties has sparked many questions around how multilingual children in remote central Australia negotiate language and learning through languages in a bilingual classroom. Her classroom-based project will endeavour to document these processes as complicated by processes of language shift. How children as the central stakeholders in their communities’ linguistic futures view and enact the language choices they make is also fertile ground for exploration.

Emma has a dual degree in Arts (Russian and German) and Social Science (Community Development) from the University of Queensland, an MA in Applied Linguistics (Literacy) from Macquarie University and an MA in International Education and Development (Governance and Planning) from the University of Sussex. She has worked in diverse language and education contexts from training foreign language teachers at the University of the Humanities, Ulaanbaatar (2008-2010), contributing to training and curriculum design at a bilingual school in Addis Ababa (2011), to interning on a project on social citizenship and social policy at the Institute of Social and Economic Research, Rhodes University (2012). Until 2016, she worked on Yuendumu School’s Bilingual Warlpiri/English program as a linguist attached to the Bilingual Resource Development Unit (BRDU). Her current role supporting language and culture programs in schools across the Northern Territory’s Barkly Region has ignited a passion for varieties of contact languages and sociolinguistic theories on language acquisition, multilingualism and language shift.

Recent Publications

  1. Communities of practice in the Warlpiri Triangle: Four decades of crafting ideological and implementational spaces for teaching in and of Warlpiri language

    Bibliography

    Emma Browne, and Fiona Napaljarri Gibson. 2021. "Communities of practice in the Warlpiri Triangle: Four decades of crafting ideological and implementational spaces for teaching in and of Warlpiri language." Languages. 6 (2) doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/languages6020068.

  2. Multimodal tools for exploring communicative practices among multilingual students in remote central Australia

    Bibliography

    Emma Browne. 2019. "Multimodal tools for exploring communicative practices among multilingual students in remote central Australia." Babel. 54 (1/2): 28-33. doi: 1885/204024.

  3. Census data on Australian Languages

    Bibliography

    Jane Simpson, Denise Angelo, Emma Browne, Inge Kral, Francis Markham, Carmel O'Shannessy, and Danielle Venn. 2018. "Census data on Australian Languages". In Endangered languages and the land: Mapping landscapes of multilingualism, 115-120. Iceland, Reykjavík.

Bonnie Cheng

Bonnie Cheng

  • Program: Processing
  • Institution: The University of Queensland

Recent Publications

  1. The effect of sleep on novel word learning in healthy adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Bibliography

    Emma Schimke, Anthony Angwin, Bonnie Cheng, and David Copland. 2021. "The effect of sleep on novel word learning in healthy adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis." Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. doi: https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-021-01980-3.

  2. Prognostication in post‐stroke aphasia: How do speech pathologists formulate and deliver information about recovery?

    Bibliography

    Bonnie Cheng, Linda Worrall, David Copland, and Sarah Wallace. 2020. "Prognostication in post‐stroke aphasia: How do speech pathologists formulate and deliver information about recovery?." Internal Journal of Language & Communication Disorders. 55 (4): 520-536. doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12534.

  3. White noise facilitates new word learning

    Bibliography

    Anthony Angwin, Wayne Wilson, Pablo Ripolles, Antoni Rodriguez-Fornells, Wendy Arnott, Robert Barry, Bonnie Cheng, Kimberley Garden, and David Copland. 2019. "White noise facilitates new word learning." Brain and Language. 199: 104699. doi: 10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104699.

Joshua Clothier

Joshua Clothier

  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Recent Publications

  1. An Investigation of the /el/–/æl/ Merger in Australian English: A Pilot Study on Production and Perception in South-West Victoria

    Bibliography

    Deborah Loakes, Joshua Clothier, John Hajek, and Janet Fletcher. October 2, 2014. "An Investigation of the /el/–/æl/ Merger in Australian English: A Pilot Study on Production and Perception in South-West Victoria." Australian Journal of Linguistics. 34 (4): 436-452. doi: 10.1080/07268602.2014.929078.

  2. Responding to a TOEFL iBT integrated speaking task: mapping task demands and test-takers’ use of stimulus content

    Bibliography

    Kellie Frost, Joshua Clothier, Annemiek Huisman, and Gillian Wigglesworth. 2020. "Responding to a TOEFL iBT integrated speaking task: mapping task demands and test-takers’ use of stimulus content." Language Testing. 37 (1): 133-155. doi: 10.1177/0265532219860750.

  3. A sociophonetic analysis of vowels produced by female Irish migrants: Investigating second dialect contact in Melbourne

    Bibliography

    Chloe Diskin, Deborah Loakes, Joshua Clothier, Ben Volchok, Sasha Calhoun, Paola Escudero, Marija Tabain, and Paul Warren. 2019. "A sociophonetic analysis of vowels produced by female Irish migrants: Investigating second dialect contact in Melbourne". In Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Melbourne, Australia, 2019, 1873-1877. Melbourne, Australia.

  4. A sociophonetic analysis of /l/ darkness and Lebanese Australian ethnic identity in Australian English

    Bibliography

    Joshua Clothier, Sasha Calhoun, Paola Escudero, Marija Tabain, and Paul Warren. 2019. "A sociophonetic analysis of /l/ darkness and Lebanese Australian ethnic identity in Australian English". In Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Melbourne, Australia, 2019, 1888-1892. Melbourne, Australia.

  5. Short vowels in L1 Aboriginal English spoken in Western Australia

    Bibliography

    Deborah Loakes, Janet Fletcher, John Hajek, Joshua Clothier, and Ben Volchok. 2016. "Short vowels in L1 Aboriginal English spoken in Western Australia". In Proceedings of the 16th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 33-36. Parramatta, Australia.

Carlo Dalle Ceste

Carlo Dalle Ceste

Topic: Reconstructing the mother tongue: new evidence for Proto Oceanic from the languages of Western Melanesia
Supervisor: Bethwyn Evans

Carlo is investigating the Oceanic languages of Western Melanesia, which may constitute a grouping within the Oceanic subgroup of the Austronesian family. His project aims at reconsidering the genetic relationships among Western Melanesian languages, revising the existing phonological and lexical reconstructions of Proto Oceanic (Ross 1988), and attempting grammatical reconstruction. As this project will require extensive data collection, Carlo will use published and unpublished materials, fieldnotes and existing grammars. A strong supporter of the philological approach to historical linguistic studies, Carlo will carefully apply the comparative method integrating both top-down and bottom-up reconstructing works.

Carlo holds a BA (Hons) in Modern languages from the University of Genoa (Italy); he then moved to the University of Pavia (Italy) to pursue his MA in Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Carlo has been consistently involved with the study of historical linguistics since the inception of his academic path, with a special focus on linguistic reconstruction at the grammatical level. Despite the "(Indo-)Eurocentrism" of his former education, he has developed a keen interest for the Oceanic and Papuan languages of Island Melanesia.

Domi Dessaix

Domi Dessaix

I have an Honours degrees in Philosophy and Linguistics, both completed at ANU.

My main research interests are in the philosophy of cognitive science and the philosophy of linguistics. In general, I am interested in the many places that philosophy and linguistics interact (or should interact).

My PhD thesis centres on a proposal about the basic concepts that underlie our cognition, essentially the “atoms of thought”. I suggest that the atoms of thought might be roughly identified with the semantic primes of Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM) research, as developed by Anna Wierzbicka and Cliff Goddard. I intend to home in on some of the significant psychological and evolutionary implications of such a proposal. I also want to show how the view compares to the "language of thought" hypothesis in classical cognitive science.

David Ferris

David Ferris

  • Program: Technology
  • Institution: The University of Queensland
Ben Foley

Ben Foley

  • Program: Technology
  • Institution: The University of Queensland

Recent Publications

  1. Applications of Natural Language Processing in Bilingual Language Teaching: An Indonesian-English Case Study

    Bibliography

    Zara Maxwell-Smith, Simón González Ochoa, Ben Foley, and Hanna Suominen. 2020. "Applications of Natural Language Processing in Bilingual Language Teaching: An Indonesian-English Case Study". In Proceedings of the Fifteenth Workshop on Innovative Use of NLP for Building Educational Applications, 124–134. Seattle, USA.

  2. Building Speech Recognition Systems for Language Documentation: The CoEDL Endangered Language Pipeline and Inference System (ELPIS)

    Bibliography

    Ben Foley, Josh Arnold, Rolando Coto-Solano, Gautier Durantin, T. Mark Ellison, Daan van Esch, Scott Heath, František Kratochvíl, Zara Maxwell-Smith, David Nash, Ola Olsson, Mark Richards, Nay San, Hywel Stoakes, Nick Thieberger, and Janet Wiles. 2018. "Building Speech Recognition Systems for Language Documentation: The CoEDL Endangered Language Pipeline and Inference System (ELPIS)". In Proceedings of the 6th International Workshop on Spoken Language Technologies for Under-Resourced Languages, 205-209. Gurugram, India.

  3. In press: Applications of Natural Language Processing in Bilingual Language Teaching: An Indonesian-English Case Study

    Bibliography

    Zara Maxwell-Smith, Ben Foley, Simon Gonzalez, and H Suominen. "In press: Applications of Natural Language Processing in Bilingual Language Teaching: An Indonesian-English Case Study". In Proceedings of the 15th Workshop on Innovative Use of NLP for Building Educational Applications,

Leonard Freeman

Leonard Freeman

  • Program: Learning
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Project: Examining the Assessments: Investigating the usefulness of remote Aboriginal students’ systemic reading test scores

Leonard Freeman started his PhD candidature at The University of Melbourne in February 2018. Leonard’s primary supervisor is Prof. Gillian Wigglesworth. Before commencing his dissertation, Leonard worked for the Northern Territory Department of Education for two years on a Literacy & Numeracy project developing curriculum resources for teaching remote Aboriginal language-speaking students.

During 2015, Leonard completed a Master’s thesis titled Empowering Indigenous-language speaking students: Challenging the deficit discourse as part of Masters of Education (International) at Charles Darwin University and received the Chancellor’s medal for his work.

Leonard completed a combined Bachelor of Arts (Economics and Geography), Bachelor of Education degree at the University of New South Wales. After completing his teaching qualification, Leonard worked for 10 years in remote Indigenous community schools in the Northern Territory. Leonard initially worked as a classroom teacher at a primary school on the Tiwi Islands. Working in this rich language context where students speak an Indigenous-language as their first language and learn English as a foreign language at school sparked Leonard’s interest in teaching English to speakers of other languages. Leonard then took on the role of teacher-linguist at the school and completed a Master of Applied Linguistics (TESOL) at Charles Darwin University.

From 2008 to 2011 Leonard coordinated the bilingual school program of a small Pitjantjatjara speaking community in Central Australia. Leonard then moved to North East Arnhem Land to work as a school principal from 2012 to 2014.

Recent Publications

  1. The impact of standardised testing on Indigenous students: the case of Australia

    Bibliography

    Freeman, Leonard, Wigglesworth, Gillian, Mirhosseini, Seyyed-Abdolhamid, and De Costa, Peter. 2020. "The impact of standardised testing on Indigenous students: the case of Australia". In The Sociopolitics of English Language Testing, London: Bloomsbury.

  2. The positioning of Aboriginal students and their languages within Australia’s education system: A human rights perspective

    Bibliography

    Leonard Freeman, and Bea Staley. 2018. "The positioning of Aboriginal students and their languages within Australia’s education system: A human rights perspective." International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. 20 (1): 174-181. doi: DOI: 10.1080/17549507.2018.1406003.

  3. The importance of explicitly teaching language and literacy to English language learners

    Bibliography

    Leonard Freeman. 2017. "The importance of explicitly teaching language and literacy to English language learners." Practical Literacy: The Early and Primary Years. 22 (2): 37-39.

  4. The Areyonga Case: Utulu kutju nintiringanyi ‘learning together'

    Bibliography

    Freeman, Leonard, Bell, Neil, Andrews, Tarna, and Gallagher, Peggy. 2017. "The Areyonga Case: Utulu kutju nintiringanyi ‘learning together'". In History of bilingual education in the Northern Territory: People, programs and policies, 219-236. Singapore: Springer.

  5. Digital storytelling as student-centred pedagogy: Empowering high school students to frame their futures

    Bibliography

    Bea Staley, and Leonard Freeman. 2017. "Digital storytelling as student-centred pedagogy: Empowering high school students to frame their futures." Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning. 12 (1): 21-38. doi: 10.1186/s41039-017-0061-9.

Maria Kristina Gallego

Maria Kristina Gallego

My main research interest is on the historical development of Philippine and Austronesian languages, and how insights from linguistics can be used to reconstruct the deeper culture history of the region. My PhD project explores the contact situation between Ibatan and Ilokano on the island of Babuyan Claro, Cagayan, Philippines, particularly correlations between linguistic outcomes of contact-induced change and mechanisms of speaker-driven cross-linguistic influence within a small multilingual community. Understanding contemporary contact outcomes will provide new evidence for investigating ongoing issues in the linguistic history of the Philippines.

Recent Publications

  1. Ibatan of Babuyan Claro (Philippines) – Language Contexts

    Bibliography

    Maria Kristina Gallego. 2020. "Ibatan of Babuyan Claro (Philippines) – Language Contexts." Language Documentation and Description. 17: 87-110.

Manuel David González Pérez

Manuel David González Pérez

Topic: A linguistic description of Ngwi language

Manuel's PhD involves the documentation of a (South-Eastern) variety of Ngwi (Tibeto-Burman) in Yunnan, China. The project will focus on grammar and semantics and will include descriptive, explanatory (functional/cognitive/diachronic), philological, lexicographic and etymological work. The main outcome will be a grammar, a lexicon and a collection of texts.

After doing some coursework in Philosophy and Classics, Manuel completed a BA in Linguistics and two MAs in Classics and Linguistics. During this time he gathered some research and teaching experience in cognitive linguistics, functional syntax, typology, corpus methods, experimental psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, diachrony, etymology, philological analysis of texts, ancient languages, grammatical and philosophical traditions.

Beyond academically grounded pursuits, he has had the opportunity to acquire spoken, literary and sociocultural proficiency in Spanish, French, Catalan, German, English, Russian and Chinese, as well as rudimentary skills in other languages. His personal commitment to linguistic and cultural diversity as a lifestyle, as a goal in and of itself, combined with his theoretical interest in the possibilities, limits and implications of linguistic plasticity led him to undertake a PhD with Nick Evans.

James Gray

James Gray

James Gray completed a BA and MA in linguistics at the University of Vienna before beginning in the PhD program in linguistics at ANU in 2019. James is examining the the syntactic and intonational realisation of information structure in Pintupi-Luritja, a Western Desert language spoken in a number of communities in central Australia. James is also more generally interested in theoretical approaches to morpho-syntactic phenomena including syncretism and allomorphy.

Recent Publications

  1. Variable Modality in Pintupi-Luritja Purposive Clauses

    Bibliography

    James Gray. 2021. "Variable Modality in Pintupi-Luritja Purposive Clauses." Languages. 6 (1): 52. doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/languages6010052.

  2. Gender/number syncretism in Yelmek verbal suppletion

    Bibliography

    James Gray, and Tina Gregor. 2019. "Gender/number syncretism in Yelmek verbal suppletion". In Proceedings of GLOW in Asia XII and SICOGG XXI, 111-125. Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Amanda Hamilton-Hollaway

Amanda Hamilton-Hollaway

  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Queensland

Amanda Hamilton is originally from the United States, and completed her previous studies at Georgetown University (BA in English) and at the University of Hawaii (MA in Linguistics--Endangered Language Documentation and Conservation). In 2010 she assisted with the Alor and Pantar Languages Project, helping collect data for research on the historical relationships among the languages spoken on Alor and Pantar islands in eastern Indonesia. Her involvement with Australian Aboriginal languages began in 2011, when she moved to Port Hedland in northwestern WA to work as a linguist at Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre. While she worked with speakers of many of the region’s 31 languages, much of her research there focused on Nyangumarta, one of the most commonly spoken languages in Port and South Hedland. She completed a pilot study on child Nyangumarta, analyzing the differences between it and the language as it is spoken by adults. This sparked her interest in language contact and change, and she plans to pursue these topics through her research at CoEDL.

Recent Publications

  1. Lend me your verbs: Verb borrowing between Jingulu and Mudburra

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, Rob Pensalfini, Caitlin Zipf, and Amanda Hamilton-Hollaway. 2020. "Lend me your verbs: Verb borrowing between Jingulu and Mudburra." Australian Journal of Linguistics. 40 (3): 296-318. doi: 10.1080/07268602.2020.1804830.

  2. Mudburra to English Dictionary

    Bibliography

    Rebecca Green, Jennifer Green, Amanda Hamilton-Hollaway, Felicity Meakins, David Osgarby, and Rob Pensalfini. 2019. Mudburra to English Dictionary. Canberra (ACT), Australia : Aboriginal Studies Press.

  3. Review of Languages in contact by Lisa Lim and Umberto Ansaldo

    Bibliography

    Amanda Hamilton-Hollaway. 2018. "Review of Languages in contact by Lisa Lim and Umberto Ansaldo." Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages. 33 (2): 433 - 437. doi: 10.1075/jpcl.00022.ham.

Alistair Harvey

Alistair Harvey

  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: University of Queensland

Recent Publications

  1. Kalaw Kawaw Ya (Saibai Island, Western Torres Strait Islands, Australia)

    Bibliography

    Alistair Harvey. 2021. "Kalaw Kawaw Ya (Saibai Island, Western Torres Strait Islands, Australia)." Language Documentation and Description. 20: 75-85.

Rita Hou

Rita Hou

  • Program: Processing
  • Institution: University of Queensland
Huade Huang

Huade Huang

Huade Huang completed his MA of General and Applied Linguistcs at the ANU. During the study, he focused on syntax and his MA thesis supervised by Prof. Jane Simpson discussed the information structure of Mandarin Chinese under the framework of Lexical-Functional Grammar. His PhD project will focus on Kua-nsi, one of under-documented Loloish languages in Yunnan Province, China. Kua-nsi has around 5000 speakers and is reported to be endangered. The aim of the project is to document and describe this language and the main outcome will be a descriptive grammar of Kua-nsi.

Bruno Ippedico

Bruno Ippedico

Bruno holds a BA (Hons) and a BSc, both from the Australian National University. Bruno has a general background in cognitive science and his Honours thesis, supervised by Kim Sterelny, discussed Chomsky’s saltationist view of language evolution and argued for a gradualist alternative to it. His PhD project concerns the role of theoretical linguistics in language evolution theorising. Bruno has a particular interest in the (present and possible) contribution of so-called generative grammar to evolutionary debates about language.

Kate Jones

Kate Jones

Recent Publications

  1. A short-form version of the Australian English communicative development inventory

    Bibliography

    Caroline Jones, Marina Kalashnikova, Chantelle Khamchuang, Catherine Best, Erin Bowcock, Anne Dwyer, Hollie Hammond, Caroline Hendy, Kate Jones, Catherine Kaplun, Lynn Kemp, Christa Lam-Cassettari, Weicong Li, Karen Mattock, Suzan Odemis, and Karen Short. 2021. "A short-form version of the Australian English communicative development inventory." International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. doi: 10.1080/17549507.2021.1981446.

Kathrin Kaiser

Kathrin Kaiser

  • Program: Technology
  • Institution: The University of Queensland

Story- and game-based language education technology. For the past decade, Kathrin has been developing game-based activities to support language learners of all ages in a variety of learning contexts in Europe and North America. Her current research is centred around educational technologies, and the design of story-based language applications to support the revival of indigenous languages. She favours project-based learning and DIY approaches that involve learners in the materials development process, to promote ownership, agency, and engagement. In 2020 she started her Phd at the UQ to investigate the potential of interactive fiction for language learning, and develop digital tools to support communities in the design of their own interactive learning materials.

Enrique Klein Garcia-Godos Evolution

Enrique Klein Garcia-Godos

  • Title: Evolution
  • Institution: The University of Queensland
Vicky Lee

Vicky Lee

  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne
Eleanor Lewis

Eleanor Lewis

  • Program: Processing
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Recent Publications

  1. New Caledonian French Accent

    Bibliography

    Lewis, Eleanor, Fletcher, Janet, and Hajek, John. 2016. "New Caledonian French Accent". In Genre, Text and Language - Mélanges Anne Freadman, 67-91. Paris: Classiques Garnier.

Shuting Li

Shuting Li

  • Program: Processing
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne
Joel Liddle

Joel Liddle

Chun Long Ma

Chun Long Ma

  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne
Zara Maxwell-Smith

Zara Maxwell-Smith

Zara is interested in using speech recognition and other technologies in education; second language acquisition; Indonesian; language variation; and sign languages. As part of her PhD, she is currently running a pilot to test speech recognition on data from an Indonesian language classroom and plans to analyse word frequency for different Indonesian varieties.

Zara also teaches the ANU Extension Program - Performing Indonesian. She co-wrote the program, which blends skills-based learning, guided research, and theories of linguistic social identity to look at Indonesian political and cultural keywords.

Recent Publications

  1. Applications of Natural Language Processing in Bilingual Language Teaching: An Indonesian-English Case Study

    Bibliography

    Zara Maxwell-Smith, Simón González Ochoa, Ben Foley, and Hanna Suominen. 2020. "Applications of Natural Language Processing in Bilingual Language Teaching: An Indonesian-English Case Study". In Proceedings of the Fifteenth Workshop on Innovative Use of NLP for Building Educational Applications, 124–134. Seattle, USA.

  2. Building Speech Recognition Systems for Language Documentation: The CoEDL Endangered Language Pipeline and Inference System (ELPIS)

    Bibliography

    Ben Foley, Josh Arnold, Rolando Coto-Solano, Gautier Durantin, T. Mark Ellison, Daan van Esch, Scott Heath, František Kratochvíl, Zara Maxwell-Smith, David Nash, Ola Olsson, Mark Richards, Nay San, Hywel Stoakes, Nick Thieberger, and Janet Wiles. 2018. "Building Speech Recognition Systems for Language Documentation: The CoEDL Endangered Language Pipeline and Inference System (ELPIS)". In Proceedings of the 6th International Workshop on Spoken Language Technologies for Under-Resourced Languages, 205-209. Gurugram, India.

  3. In press: Applications of Natural Language Processing in Bilingual Language Teaching: An Indonesian-English Case Study

    Bibliography

    Zara Maxwell-Smith, Ben Foley, Simon Gonzalez, and H Suominen. "In press: Applications of Natural Language Processing in Bilingual Language Teaching: An Indonesian-English Case Study". In Proceedings of the 15th Workshop on Innovative Use of NLP for Building Educational Applications,

Terence Morgan

Terence Morgan

Saliha Muradoglu

Saliha Muradoglu

Recent Publications

  1. To compress or not to compress? A Finite-State approach to Nen verbal morphology

    Bibliography

    Saliha Muradoglu, Nicholas Evans, and Hanna Suominen. 2020. "To compress or not to compress? A Finite-State approach to Nen verbal morphology". In Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Student Research Workshop, 207–213.

  2. Linguist vs. Machine: Rapid Development of Finite-State Morphological Grammars

    Bibliography

    Sarah Beemer, Zak Boston, April Bukoski, Daniel Chen, Princess Dickens, Andrew Gerlach, Torin Hopkins, Parth Anand Jawale, Chris Koski, Akanksha Malhotra, Piyush Mishra, Saliha Muradoglu, Lan Sang, Tyler Short, Sagarika Shreevastava, Elizabeth Spaulding, Testumichi Umada, Beilei Xiang, Changbing Yang, and Mans Hulden. 2020. "Linguist vs. Machine: Rapid Development of Finite-State Morphological Grammars". In Proceedings of the 17th SIGMORPHON Workshop on Computational Research in Phonetics, Phonology, and Morphology, 162–170. Online.

Meredith Osmond

Meredith Osmond

Gloria Pino Escobar

Gloria Pino Escobar

Topic: Bridging the gap between domain-general cognitive processes and word learning in monolingual and bilingual children

Supervisors: Assoc Prof Paola Escudero, Dr Alba Tuninetti and Dr Mark Antoniou

Gloria Pino Escobar is a PhD candidate in the MARCS Institute at Western Sydney University. Gloria completed a Bachelor of Arts (Interpreting and Translation) at WSU and a Master of Science at the MARCS Institute. Gloria is interested in the cognitive processes involved in different aspects of language (e.g., word learning, comprehension and production) in bi/multilingual and monolingual speakers. Gloria’s thesis investigates which key executive functions predict monolingual and bilingual children's word learning abilities under three conditions (i.e., mutual exclusivity, cross-situational and incidental novel word learning), and their capacity to retain the newly learnt words throughout time. This study will potentially demonstrate individual language learning strategies that can be used to leverage vocabulary learning in children in a tailor-made fashion.

Beyond academia, Gloria’s interests extend to language-related activities working as a NAATI-accredited Spanish interpreter and translator and as volunteer teacher at Amistad Latina Spanish Community Language School.

Recent Publications

  1. Four-Year-Old's Online Versus Face-to-Face Word Learning via eBooks

    Bibliography

    Paola Escudero, Gloria Pino Escobar, Charlotte Casey, and Kristyn Sommer. 2021. "Four-Year-Old's Online Versus Face-to-Face Word Learning via eBooks." Frontiers in Psychology. 12: 610925. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.610975.

  2. Vocabulary matters! The relationship between verbal fluency and measures of inhibitory control in monolingual and bilingual children

    Bibliography

    Gloria Pino Escobar, Marina Kalashnikova, and Paola Escudero. 2018. "Vocabulary matters! The relationship between verbal fluency and measures of inhibitory control in monolingual and bilingual children." Journal of Experimental Child Psychology,. 170: 177-189. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2018.01.012.

  3. The bilingual advantage in the language processing domain: Evidence from the Verbal Fluency Task

    Bibliography

    Gloria Pino Escobar, Marina Kalashnikova, and Paola Escudero. 2016. "The bilingual advantage in the language processing domain: Evidence from the Verbal Fluency Task". In Proceedings of the 16th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 129-132. Parramatta, Australia.

  4. Speech normalization across speaker, sex and accent variation is handled similarly by listeners of different language backgrounds

    Bibliography

    Gloria Pino Escobar, Josephine Terry, Buddhamas Kriengwatana, and Paola Escudero. 2016. "Speech normalization across speaker, sex and accent variation is handled similarly by listeners of different language backgrounds". In Proceedings of the 16th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 161-164. Parramatta, Australia.

Susan Poetsch

Susan Poetsch

Recent Publications

  1. Unrecognised language teaching. Teaching Australian Curriculum content in remote Aboriginal community schools

    Bibliography

    Susan Poetsch. 2020. "Unrecognised language teaching. Teaching Australian Curriculum content in remote Aboriginal community schools." TESOL in Context. 29 (1): 37-58. doi: https://doi.org/10.21153/tesol2020vol29no1art1423.

  2. Learning and teaching Gumbaynggirr through story: Behind the scenes of professional learning workshops for teachers of an Aboriginal language

    Bibliography

    Susan Poetsch, Michael Jarrett, and Denise Angelo. 2019. "Learning and teaching Gumbaynggirr through story: Behind the scenes of professional learning workshops for teachers of an Aboriginal language." Language Documentation & Conservation. 13: 231-252.

  3. From the ground up: How Aboriginal languages teachers design school-based programs in their local language ecology, with Carmel Ryan, Marmingee Hand, Nathan Schrieber and Michael Jarrett

    Bibliography

    Denise Angelo, and Susan Poetsch. 2019. "From the ground up: How Aboriginal languages teachers design school-based programs in their local language ecology, with Carmel Ryan, Marmingee Hand, Nathan Schrieber and Michael Jarrett." Babel. 54 (1/2): 11-20. doi: 1885/204023.

  4. Languaging their Learning: How Children Work their Languages for Classroom Learning

    Bibliography

    Poetsch, Susan. 2018. "Languaging their Learning: How Children Work their Languages for Classroom Learning". In Language Practices of Indigenous Children and Youth: The Transition from Home to School, 142-172. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

  5. Building on achievements: training options for Gumbaynggirr language teachers

    Bibliography

    Poetsch, Susan, Jarrett, Michael, and Williams, Gary. 2018. "Building on achievements: training options for Gumbaynggirr language teachers". In Promising Practices in Indigenous Teacher Education, 175-187. Singapore: Springer.

Gan Qiao

Gan Qiao

“Language Use and Ethnic Identity: Evidence from Australian English by Second Generation Migrants from China”

Gan completed his MA in 2019 at Xi’an Jiaotong University where he mainly focused on structural priming and interactive alignment in L2 English. Now he is doing his PhD on the Sydney Speaks project, working under the guidance of Catherine Travis. His project examines ethnolectal variation in morphosyntactic features in Australian English used by Anglo-, Greek-, Italian- and Chinese-Australians, with a particular focus on Chinese-Australians, including from Hong Kong and mainland China. In his research, he uses quantitative methods and adopts apparent-time and real-time constructs to investigate where ethnolectal variation comes from and how ethnolects change across time.

Kyla Quinn

Kyla Quinn

Kyla Quinn is starting her PhD in 2015. Her PhD will examine syncretism in the world's languages with a view to determining the utility of syncretic patterns as a tool for diagnosing phylogeny and contact relationships between languages. For the past 14 years Kyla has been working for the Australian Government in IT and Engineering related fields. She has experience in the statistical analysis of large datasets, computer programming and scripting in several languages. Most recently, she has been involved in strategic planning. Seven years ago Kyla started studying part time for fun and found a new passion for linguistics. In 2014, she graduated from ANU with a BA(Hons) majoring in Linguistics and Indonesian. Her Honours thesis was based on fieldwork she undertook in Wando Village, located on the Torassi River in Western Province, Papua New Guinea. The thesis outlined the verbal morphology of Thuntai and constituted the first documentation of the language. Kyla volunteers for local wildlife rescue organisation, Wildcare. She is a venomous snake catcher and raptor rehabilitator. She is also gaining experience as a toddler-wrangler, looking after her 18 month old son William.

Recent Publications

  1. Kin Against Kin: Internal Co-selection and the Coherence of Kinship Typologies

    Bibliography

    Sam Passmore, Barth Wolfgang, Kyla Quinn, Simon Greenhill, Nicholas Evans, and Fiona Jordan. 2021. "Kin Against Kin: Internal Co-selection and the Coherence of Kinship Typologies." Biological Theory. 16 (3): 176–193. doi: 10.1007/s13752-021-00379-6.

  2. Kin Against Kin: Internal Co-selection and the Coherence of Kinship Typologies

    Bibliography

    Sam Passmore, Wolfgang Barth, Kyla Quinn, Simon Greenhill, Nicholas Evans, and Fiona Jordan. 2021. "Kin Against Kin: Internal Co-selection and the Coherence of Kinship Typologies." Biological Theory. doi: 10.1007/s13752-021-00379-6.

  3. The languages of Southern New Guinea

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas, Arka, Wayan, Carroll, Matthew, Choi, Yun Jung, Döhler, Christian, Gast, Volker, Kashima, Eri, Mittag, Emil, Olsson, Bruno, Quinn, Kyla, Schokkin, Dineke, Tama, Philip, Tongeren, Charlotte van, Siegel, Jeff, and Palmer, Bill. 2018. "The languages of Southern New Guinea". In The Languages and Linguistics of the New Guinea Area, 641–774. De Gruyter.

  4. The languages of Southern New Guinea

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas, Arka, Wayan, Carroll, Matthew, Dohler, Christian, Kashima, Eri, Mittag, Emil, Gast, Volker, Schokkin, Dineke, Quinn, Kyla, Tama, Philip, Van Tongeren, Charlotte, Olsson, Bruno, and Siegel, Jeff. 2017. "The languages of Southern New Guinea". In The Languages and Linguistics of New Guinea: A Comprehensive Guide, 641-774. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

Anjilkurri Rhonda Radley

Anjilkurri Rhonda Radley

Maddie Radnan

Maddie Radnan

Alina Rakhi Ajayan

Alina Rakhi Ajayan

  • Program: Technology
  • Institution: The University of Queensland
Carlos Ramirez

Carlos Ramirez

  • Program: Technology
  • Institution: University of Queensland

Carlos is a Mechatronics Engineer that has been part of the centre since late 2016. His role as a Research Assistant allowed him to contribute mostly on hardware development in many of the social robots from the ITEE Co-innovation group at the University of Queensland. Currently, Carlos is studying towards a PhD where his research covers areas of Human-Robot interaction, perception of effect in robots, design and, control policies. "My PhD aims to develop a rhetoric of robot movement that is able to convey emotional content and expression in a small number of robot morphologies. Robots are subject to design constraints that inadvertently limit their capacities to express and communicate effectively with human counterparts and more so when they are expected to provide entertainment, company or support. Through my Doctoral research I will examine the underlying relationships between form, movement continuity, time response and control requirements that create legible movement loaded with emotional expression".

Lauren Reed

Lauren Reed

  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The Australian National University

Recent Publications

  1. Like hand, like mouth: On the role of gesture-linked mouth actions in the evolution of language

    Bibliography

    Ronald Planer, and Lauren Reed. 2021. "Like hand, like mouth: On the role of gesture-linked mouth actions in the evolution of language." Biological Theory. doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13752-021-00377-8.

  2. “Now the story’s turning around”: Associated motion and directionality in Ende, a language of Papua New Guinea

    Bibliography

    Reed, Lauren, and Lindsey, Kate. 2021. "“Now the story’s turning around”: Associated motion and directionality in Ende, a language of Papua New Guinea". In Associated Motion, 357–384. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

  3. Sign Languages in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands

    Bibliography

    Reed, Lauren, and Rumsey, Alan. 2020. "Sign Languages in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands". In Sign language in Papua New Guinea: A Primary Sign Language from the Upper Lagaip Valley, Enga Province, 141-184. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

  4. Ku Waru Clause Chaining and the Acquisition of Complex Syntax

    Bibliography

    Alan Rumsey, Lauren Reed, and Francesca Merlan. 2020. "Ku Waru Clause Chaining and the Acquisition of Complex Syntax." Frontiers in Communication. 5: 19. doi: 10.3389/fcomm.2020.00019.

  5. "Switching caps": Two ways of communicating in sign in the Port Moresby deaf community, Papua New Guinea

    Bibliography

    Lauren Reed. 2020. ""Switching caps": Two ways of communicating in sign in the Port Moresby deaf community, Papua New Guinea." Asia-Pacific Language Variation. 6 (1): 13-52. doi: 10.1075/aplv.19010.ree.

Ashleigh Richardson

Ashleigh Richardson

  • Program: Technology
  • Institution: University of Queensland

Ashleigh Richardson is a PhD candidate in the co-innovation group in the School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering at the University of Queensland. Her supervisors are Prof. Janet Wiles and Assoc. Prof. Marcus Gallagher. Ashleigh received her BE (Hons) in Software Engineering from the University of Queensland in 2018. Her research interests include sequence transduction, natural language processing, machine learning for creativity, and machine learning for low-resource applications. Her research work focuses on guiding the design of low-resource machine learning systems for use in real-world applications.

Joshua Roberts

Joshua Roberts

Emma Schimke

Emma Schimke

Recent Publications

  1. The effect of sleep on novel word learning in healthy adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Bibliography

    Emma Schimke, Anthony Angwin, Bonnie Cheng, and David Copland. 2021. "The effect of sleep on novel word learning in healthy adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis." Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. doi: https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-021-01980-3.

Elena Sheard

Elena Sheard

“Language and social change over the lifespan: Speakers of Australian English forty years on”

Elena completed Honours in 2017 at the University of Sydney, focusing on linguistic variation and language ideologies in young adults from Western and Northern Sydney, based on which she published an article in the Australian Journal of Linguistics in 2019. She is now doing her PhD with the Sydney Speaks project, under the supervision of Catherine Travis. Her thesis involves a lifespan study, examining the speech of a group of Anglo-, Greek-, and Italian-Australians who were recorded as teenagers (in the 1970s) and again as adults (in the 2010s). The project uses quantitative methods to investigate the role of the individual in language change and the relationship(s) between different variables (phonological, morphological and discourse) over time on the level of the community and individual.

Simon Tabuni

Simon Tabuni

Topic: Traditional Ecological Knowledge of the Kaiso: A Linguistic Ethnobiology Perspectives

The principal goal of my research is to document the linguistic encoding system of the knowledge pertaining to the indigenous natural world of Kais (a less-documented and highly endangered Papuan of Trans-New Guinea language of Indonesia) focusing on (1) the linguistic encoding system of (2) the conceptualization of, and (3) folk classification system of, forest and its living organism (plants, animals, and birds) and the associated natural and cultural knowledge. A variety of topics will be covered in this research spanning from motivations of particular chosen linguistic encoding systems, attributes and categorization of conceptualization of natural world. This study will also cover the issue of the naming of hamlets and natural land borders.

The main outcome will be the collection of text and encyclopaedic knowledge of Kais environment embedded in their language.

I finished my master’s degree at School of Oriental and African Study SOAS University of London, with a dissertation entitled “Encoding, Conceptualisation, and Classification of plants in Western Dani: A Linguistic Ethnobiological Approach”. My aim in that thesis was to document the linguistic encoding system pertaining to the indigenous natural world in Western Dani (a Trans New Guinea language).

Since finishing my Master’s study, I have been working at the Centre for Endangered Languages Documentation CELD Papua University. From March 2019 to January 2020 I worked as research assistant for the Kais-Konda documentation project founded by Endangered Language Documentation Programme, SOAS, London. My main task is collecting the narration and describing Kais language.

Alister Thorpe

Alister Thorpe

  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Topic: Decolonising ethics? Acritical analysis of researchers intended ethical research practices and the role of Indigenous communities in ensuring ethical research

Supervisors: Assoc Professor Jane Freemantle, Prof Rachel Nordlinger, Prof Ian Anderson

Alister Thorpe is a proud Aboriginal man from the Gunai (East Gippsland) Yorta Yorta (Goulbourn Valley), and Gunditjmara (Western Districts) clans in south-eastern Australia with many family and connections throughout Victoria.

Alister is currently a PhD candidate with the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne and a recipient of a Lowitja Institute PhD scholarship. His research will incorporate a decolonising methodological approach from an Indigenous standpoint and aims to explore how Indigenous communities ensure researchers adhere to Indigenous health research ethical principles. Alister intends to use the skills and knowledge he has acquired to contribute to positive outcomes around health and wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Charlotte van Tongeren

Charlotte van Tongeren

Recent Publications

  1. The languages of Southern New Guinea

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas, Arka, Wayan, Carroll, Matthew, Choi, Yun Jung, Döhler, Christian, Gast, Volker, Kashima, Eri, Mittag, Emil, Olsson, Bruno, Quinn, Kyla, Schokkin, Dineke, Tama, Philip, Tongeren, Charlotte van, Siegel, Jeff, and Palmer, Bill. 2018. "The languages of Southern New Guinea". In The Languages and Linguistics of the New Guinea Area, 641–774. De Gruyter.

  2. The languages of Southern New Guinea

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas, Arka, Wayan, Carroll, Matthew, Dohler, Christian, Kashima, Eri, Mittag, Emil, Gast, Volker, Schokkin, Dineke, Quinn, Kyla, Tama, Philip, Van Tongeren, Charlotte, Olsson, Bruno, and Siegel, Jeff. 2017. "The languages of Southern New Guinea". In The Languages and Linguistics of New Guinea: A Comprehensive Guide, 641-774. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

Nicole Traynor

Nicole Traynor

Topic: The role of affect and infant-directed speech on infants’ early word learning

Supervisors: Paola Escudero, Gabrielle Weidemann, Karen Mulak, and Marina Kalashnikova

Overview: Nicole Traynor is a PhD candidate in psycholinguistics at the MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development at Western Sydney University. Nicole completed a Bachelor of Psychology with Honours at Western in 2016. Her Honours research investigated positive affect and its involvement in infants’ early word learning. Nicole’s doctoral research develops this work, with a particular focus on the cognitive resources required to learn, and the effects of task demands. Further, the project will assess affect and infant-directed speech at an individual level.

Recent Publications

  1. "Mummy keep it steady": Phonetic variation shapes word learning at 15 and 17 months

    Bibliography

    Paola Escudero, Karen Mulak, Jaydene Elvin, and Nicole Traynor. 2018. ""Mummy keep it steady": Phonetic variation shapes word learning at 15 and 17 months." Developmental Science. 21 (5): e12640. doi: 10.1111/desc.12640.

  2. “Mummy, keep it steady”: phonetic variation shapes word learning at 15 and 17 months

    Bibliography

    Paola Escudero, Karen Mulak, Jaydene Elvin, and Nicole Traynor. 2017. "“Mummy, keep it steady”: phonetic variation shapes word learning at 15 and 17 months." Developmental science. 21 (5): e12640. doi: 10.1111/desc.12640.

  3. The role of positive affect in the acquisition of word-object associations

    Bibliography

    Nicole Traynor, Karen Mulak, Rachel Robbins, Gabrielle Weidemann, and Paola Escudero. 2016. "The role of positive affect in the acquisition of word-object associations". In Proceedings of the Sixteenth Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 9-12. Parramatta.

  4. The role of positive affect in the acquisition of word-object associations

    Bibliography

    Nicole Traynor, Karen Mulak, Rachel Robbins, Gabrielle Weidemann, and Paola Escudero. 2016. "The role of positive affect in the acquisition of word-object associations". In Proceedings of the 16th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 9-12. Parramatta, Australia.

Sasha Wilmoth

Sasha Wilmoth

  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Sasha Wilmoth’s PhD project is a study of intergenerational variation and change in Pitjantjatjara, a Western Desert language spoken in Central Australia. Sasha completed a Bachelor of Arts with Honours at the University of Melbourne in 2014. Her Honours research focused on the distribution of some under-described discourse-marking clitics in Murrinhpatha. Since completing her Honours degree, she has been working in the language technology industry at the Sydney-based company Appen, using computational methods to develop various types of language data for machine learning. She has also been working as a research assistant with Felicity Meakins at the University of Queensland, developing a longitudinal corpus of Gurindji Kriol.

Recent Publications

  1. They Talk Muṯumuṯu: Variable Elision of Tense Suffixes in Contemporary Pitjantjatjara

    Bibliography

    Sasha Wilmoth, Rebecca Defina, and Deborah Loakes. 2021. "They Talk Muṯumuṯu: Variable Elision of Tense Suffixes in Contemporary Pitjantjatjara." Languages. 6 (2) doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/languages6020069.

  2. Inflectional predictability and prosodic morphology in Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara

    Bibliography

    Sasha Wilmoth, and John Mansfield. 2021. "Inflectional predictability and prosodic morphology in Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara." Morphology. doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11525-021-09380-y.

  3. Overabundance resulting from language contact: Complex cell-mates in Gurindji Kriol

    Bibliography

    Meakins, Felicity, Wilmoth, Sasha, Arkadiev, Peter, and Gardani, Francesco. 2020. "Overabundance resulting from language contact: Complex cell-mates in Gurindji Kriol". In Morphological Complexity, 81-104. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Megan Wood

Megan Wood

  • Program: Learning
  • Institution: The Australian National University
Lesley Woods

Lesley Woods

Lesley is from the Ngiyampaa language group from Western New South Wales. She grew up in and around Ivanhoe and has lived and has worked in the Pilbara region of Western Australia for many years.

She completed her Masters at Monash University and is currently a PhD candidate at Australian National University.

Lesley collaborated on Ngiyampaa language projects with linguist Dr Tamsin Donaldson over many years. Lesley spent several years working in her own community in New South Wales, teaching language classes to community members and developing a Ngiyampaa language program at the local school. She has also been collaborating with her singer/songwriter niece to write songs incorporating their mother tongue.

More recently, Lesley has been interested in ethics in linguistic research, this has come about through her own experiences and insights into linguistics in Australia and was the topic a research project for her Master’s degree.

Recent Publications

  1. Toward linguistic justice for Indigenous people: A response to Charity Hudley, Mallinson, and Bucholtz

    Bibliography

    Alice Gaby, and Lesley Woods. 2020. "Toward linguistic justice for Indigenous people: A response to Charity Hudley, Mallinson, and Bucholtz." Language. 96 (4): 775381. doi: 10.1353/lan.2020.0078.

Li-Chen Yeh

Li-Chen Yeh

Jenny Yu

Jenny Yu

Topic: Prosody and Syntactic Disambiguation in English and German

Supervisors: Dr Heather Kember, Professor Anne Cutler, and Dr Robert Mailhammer

Overview: Jenny is a PhD candidate in psycholinguistics at the MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development at Western Sydney University. Her thesis will compare how English and German speakers use prosody (features of speech such as loudness, pitch, and duration) to understand and produce sentences when word order is ambiguous. Jenny has previously completed a Bachelor of Psychology (Hons) at The University of Sydney in 2015.

Recent Publications

  1. Vocabulary structure affects word recognition: Evidence from German listeners

    Bibliography

    Jenny Yu, Robert Mailhammer, and Anne Cutler. 2020. "Vocabulary structure affects word recognition: Evidence from German listeners". In Proceedings of Speech Prosody 2020, 735-739. Tokyo.

  2. Compensation strategies in non-native English and German

    Bibliography

    Katharina Zahner, Jenny Yu, Sasha Calhoun, Paola Escudero, Marija Tabain, and Paul Warren. 2019. "Compensation strategies in non-native English and German". In Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Melbourne, Australia, 2019, 1670-1674. Melbourne, Australia.

  3. The processing of linguistic prominence

    Bibliography

    Heather Kember, Jiyoun Choi, Anne Cutler, and Jenny Yu. 2019. "The processing of linguistic prominence." Language and Speech. 1-24. doi: 10.1177/0023830919880217.

  4. Searching for importance: focus facilitates memory for words in English

    Bibliography

    Heather Kember, Jiyoun Choi, and Jenny Yu. 2016. "Searching for importance: focus facilitates memory for words in English". In Proceedings of the S16th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 181-184. Parramatta, Australia.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University