Associate Investigators

Daniel Angus Associate Professor

Daniel Angus

Daniel Angus received the BS/BE double degree in research and development, and electronics and computer systems, and the PhD degree in computer science from Swinburne University of Technology, in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Dr. Angus joined The University of Queensland in 2008 as part of the ARC Thinking Systems initiative, and in 2012 began a strategic initiative in communication technologies between the then School of Journalism and Communication and School of Information Technology & Electrical Engineering. In 2018 Dr. Angus joined the team at the Queensland University of Technology.

His research focuses on the development of visualization and analysis methods for communication data, with a specific focus on conversation data. Dr. Angus and colleagues pioneered the development of the Discursis computer-based visual text analytic tool, used to analyse various forms of communication. Discursis has been used to analyse conversations, web forums, training scenarios, among other large and complex datasets, and is featured in numerous journal articles.

Recent Publications

  1. An Automated Approach to Examining Pausing in the Speech of People With Dementia

    Bibliography

    Rachel Sluis, Daniel Angus, Janet Wiles, Andrew Beck, Ting Ting Gibson, Jacki Liddle, Peter Worthy, David Copland, and Anthony Angwin. 2020. "An Automated Approach to Examining Pausing in the Speech of People With Dementia." American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias. doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/1533317520939773.

  2. Recurrence Methods for Communication Data, Reflecting on 20 Years of Progress

    Bibliography

    Daniel Angus. 2020. "Recurrence Methods for Communication Data, Reflecting on 20 Years of Progress." Frontiers in Applied Mathematics and Statistics. 5: doi: doi.org/10.3389/fams.2019.00054.

  3. Ripples of mediatization: Social media and the exposure of the pool interview

    Bibliography

    Sean Rintel, Daniel Angus, and Richard Fitzgerald. 2015. "Ripples of mediatization: Social media and the exposure of the pool interview." Discourse, Context & Media. 11: 50-64. doi: 10.1016/j.dcm.2015.10.003.

  4. Journalism Meets Interaction Design An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Teaching Initiative

    Bibliography

    Daniel Angus, and Skye Doherty. 2015. "Journalism Meets Interaction Design An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Teaching Initiative." Journalism & Mass Communication Educator. 70 (1): 44-57. doi: 10.1177/1077695814563981.

  5. In press: Determining the Number of Samples Required to Estimate Entropy in Natural Sequences

    Bibliography

    Andrew Back, Daniel Angus, and Janet Wiles. 2019. "In press: Determining the Number of Samples Required to Estimate Entropy in Natural Sequences." IEEE Transaction on Information Theory.

I Wayan Arka Associate Professor

I Wayan Arka

Wayan Arka is interested in Austronesian and Papuan languages of Eastern Indonesia, language typology, syntactic theory and language documentation. His current project on the typological study of core arguments and marking in Austronesian languages is an extension of my previous collaborative project with Indonesian linguists on the languages of Eastern Indonesia. He is still working on the Rongga materials collected for The Rongga Documentation Project, funded by the Hans Rausing ELDP grant (2004-6). He is also currently doing collaborative research on voice in the Austronesian languages of eastern Indonesia (funded by an NSF grant, 2006-2009), Indonesian Parallel Grammar Project (funded by a near-miss grant from Sydney University (2007) and an ARC Discovery grant (2008-2011), and the languages of Southern New Guinea (funded by an ARC grant 2011-2015).

Brett Baker Associate Professor

Brett Baker

Brett Baker is a senior lecturer in linguistics, the author of Word Structure in Ngalakgan (2008), and the co-editor (with Ilana Mushin) of Discourse and Grammar in Australian Languages (2008).

Recent Publications

  1. Discrimination of Multiple Coronal Stop Contrasts in Wubuy (Australia): A Natural Referent Consonant Account

    Bibliography

    Catherine Best, Mark Harvey, Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen, Brett Baker, and Christian Kroos. 2015. "Discrimination of Multiple Coronal Stop Contrasts in Wubuy (Australia): A Natural Referent Consonant Account." PLoS ONE. 10 (12): e0142054. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0142054.

  2. Pause acceptability indicates word-internal structure in Wubuy

    Bibliography

    Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen, and Brett Baker. 2020. "Pause acceptability indicates word-internal structure in Wubuy." Cognition,. 198: 104167. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2019.104167.

  3. Native prosodic systems and learning experience shape production of non-native tones

    Bibliography

    Mengyue Wu, Janet Fletcher, Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen, and Brett Baker. 2016. "Native prosodic systems and learning experience shape production of non-native tones". In Proceedings of Speech Prosody 2016, 587-591. Boston, USA.

  4. Perception of voicing in the absence of native voicing experience

    Bibliography

    Brett Baker, and Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen. 2015. "Perception of voicing in the absence of native voicing experience". In 16th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, 2352-2356. Dresden, Germany.

  5. The Vowel inventory of Roper Kriol

    Bibliography

    Brett Baker, and Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen. 2015. "The Vowel inventory of Roper Kriol". In Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Glasgow, Scotland.

Steven Bird Professor

Steven Bird

Steven Bird is Professor in the Northern Institute at Charles Darwin University. He is developing scalable methods for documenting and revitalising endangered languages, with a focus on the Bininj Kunwok language of West Arnhem.

Recent Publications

  1. Natural language processing with Python

    Bibliography

    Steven Bird, Edward Loper, and Ewan Klein. 2009. Natural language processing with Python. Sebatopol, CA : O’Reilly Media Inc.

David Bradley Professor

David Bradley

David Bradley has conducted extensive research on endangered languages, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, geolinguistics, language policy and phonetics/phonology in Southeast, East and South Asia over many years, especially on Tibeto-Burman languages, as well as on other languages of these areas and on varieties of English. He is a member of the editorial boards of eight international journals and monograph series, the author, co-author, editor or co-editor of over twenty books and five language atlases, several with translation and/or second and third editions; and of numerous other publications.

Recent Publications

  1. Lisu

    Bibliography

    Bradley, David, Grandi, Nicola, and Kortvelyessy, Livia. 2015. "Lisu". In Edinburgh Handbook of Evaluative Morphology, 361-366. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

  2. An acoustic study of vowels in northern Lisu

    Bibliography

    Rael Stanley, David Bradley, Marja Tabain, and Defen Yu. 2019. "An acoustic study of vowels in northern Lisu". In Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Melbourne, Australia, 2019,

  3. Language reclamation strategies: Some Tibeto-Burman examples

    Bibliography

    David Bradley. 2015. "Language reclamation strategies: Some Tibeto-Burman examples." Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area. 38 (2): 3-21. doi: 10.1075/ltba.38.2.01bra.

  4. Chinese calendar animals in Shanhaijng and in Sino-Tibetan languages

    Bibliography

    Bradley, David, and Likun, Pei. 2015. "Chinese calendar animals in Shanhaijng and in Sino-Tibetan languages". In World Geographical Philosophy of Shanhaijing and Chinese Traditional Culture, 93-101. Beijing: Beijing Foreign Studies University Press.

  5. Lisu

    Bibliography

    Bradley, David. 2015. "Lisu". In Encyclopedia of Chinese Language and Linguistics., Leiden: Brill.

Denis Burnham Professor

Denis Burnham

Denis Burnham is the inaugural Director of MARCS at the Western Sydney University. His current research focuses on experiential and inherited influences in speech and language development: infant speech perception; auditory-visual (AV) speech perception; special speech registers, including ,infant-, pet-, foreigner-, computer-, and lover-directed speech; captions for the hearing impaired; tone languages: lexical tone perception, tone perception with cochlear implants, and speech-music interactions; human-machine interaction; speech corpus studies; and the role of infants’ perceptual experience and expertise, in literacy development.

Recent Publications

  1. Constraints on Tone Sensitivity in Novel Word Learning by Monolingual and Bilingual Infants: Tone properties are more influential than tone familiarity

    Bibliography

    Denis Burnham, Leher Singh, Karen Mattock, Pei J Woo, and Marina Kalashnikova. 2018. "Constraints on Tone Sensitivity in Novel Word Learning by Monolingual and Bilingual Infants: Tone properties are more influential than tone familiarity." Frontiers in Psychology. 8: doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02190.

  2. The Temporal Modulation Structure of Infant-Directed Speech

    Bibliography

    Victoria Leong, Marina Kalashnikova, Denis Burnham, and Usha Goswami. 2017. "The Temporal Modulation Structure of Infant-Directed Speech." Open Mind. 1 (2): 78-90. doi: 10.1162/OPMI_a_00008.

  3. Effect of Linguistic and Musical Experience on Distributional Learning of Nonnative Lexical Tones

    Bibliography

    Jia Hoong Ong, Denis Burnham, Paola Escudero, and Catherine Stevens. 2017. "Effect of Linguistic and Musical Experience on Distributional Learning of Nonnative Lexical Tones." Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research. 60 (10): 2769-2780. doi: 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0080.

  4. Learning novel musical pitch via distributional learning

    Bibliography

    Jia Hoong Ong, Denis Burnham, and Catherine Stevens. 2017. "Learning novel musical pitch via distributional learning." Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. 43 (1): 150-157. doi: 10.1037/xlm0000286.

  5. Auditory–visual speech perception in three-and four-year-olds and its relationship to perceptual attunement and receptive vocabulary

    Bibliography

    Dogu Erdener, and Denis Burnham. 2017. "Auditory–visual speech perception in three-and four-year-olds and its relationship to perceptual attunement and receptive vocabulary." Journal of Child Language. 45 (2): 273-289. doi: 10.1017/S0305000917000174.

Michael Christie Professor

Michael Christie

Michael Christie heads up the Contemporary Indigenous Governance and Knowledge Systems research theme at the Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University. Professor Christie worked in Yolŋu communities as a teacher linguist in the 1970s and 1980s, and started the Yolŋu Studies program at Northern Territory University (now CDU) in 1994. After working within the Faculty of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies and the School of Education, he moved to the Northern Institute in 2010. He has over 40 years involvement with bilingual education, linguistics and literature production in the NT, and the ways in which Aboriginal philosophies and pedagogies have influenced the production and use of literature over the years. He is a major contributor to the Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages.

Recent Publications

  1. Digital Futures for Bilingual Books

    Bibliography

    Bow, Cathy, Christie, Michael, and Devlin, Brian. 2017. "Digital Futures for Bilingual Books". In History of Bilingual Education in the Northern Territory, 347-353. Singapore: Springer.

David Copland Professor

David Copland

Professor David Copland is a Principal Research Fellow and Speech Pathologist conducting research in the areas of language neuroscience, psycholinguistics, and neuroimaging of normal and disordered language. He is Deputy Chair of the Research and Postgraduate Studies Committee of the UQ School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences and is a group leader at the UQ Centre for Clinical Research where he leads the Language Neuroscience Laboratory.

Recent Publications

  1. Theta and gamma connectivity is linked with affective and cognitive symptoms in Parkinson's disease

    Bibliography

    Kartik Iyer, Tiffany Au, Anthony Angwin, David Copland, and Nadeeka Dissanayaka. 2020. "Theta and gamma connectivity is linked with affective and cognitive symptoms in Parkinson's disease." Journal of Affective Disorders. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.08.086.

  2. An Automated Approach to Examining Pausing in the Speech of People With Dementia

    Bibliography

    Rachel Sluis, Daniel Angus, Janet Wiles, Andrew Beck, Ting Ting Gibson, Jacki Liddle, Peter Worthy, David Copland, and Anthony Angwin. 2020. "An Automated Approach to Examining Pausing in the Speech of People With Dementia." American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias. doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/1533317520939773.

  3. Prognostication in post‐stroke aphasia: How do speech pathologists formulate and deliver information about recovery?

    Bibliography

    Bonnie Cheng, Linda Worrall, David Copland, and Sarah Wallace. 2020. "Prognostication in post‐stroke aphasia: How do speech pathologists formulate and deliver information about recovery?." Internal Journal of Language & Communication Disorders. doi: doi.org/10.1111/1460-6984.12534.

  4. Alterations to dual stream connectivity predicts response to aphasia therapy following stroke

    Bibliography

    Kartik Iyer, Anthony Angwin, Sophia Van Hees, Katie McMahon, Michael Breakspear, and David Copland. 2020. "Alterations to dual stream connectivity predicts response to aphasia therapy following stroke." Cortex. 125: 30-43. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2019.12.017.

  5. White noise facilitates new word learning

    Bibliography

    Anthony Angwin, Wayne Wilson, Pablo Ripolles, Antoni Rodriguez-Fornells, Wendy Arnott, Robert Barry, Bonnie Cheng, Kimberley Garden, and David Copland. 2019. "White noise facilitates new word learning." Brain and Language. 199: doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104699.

Nick Enfield Professor

Nick Enfield

  • Title: Professor
  • Program: Shape/Evolution
  • Institution: The University of Sydney

Nick Enfield’s research addresses the intersection of language, cognition, social interaction, and culture, from three main angles: 1. Semiotic structure and process; 2. Causal dependencies in semiotic systems; 3. Language and Human Sociality. His empirical specialisation is in the languages of mainland Southeast Asia, especially Lao and Kri. Lao is the national language of Laos, spoken by over 20 million people in Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and elsewhere. Kri (Vietic sub-branch of Austroasiatic) is spoken near the Laos-Vietnam border in Khammouane Province by an isolated community of around 300 people.

Recent Publications

  1. Reciprocals.

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas, Levinson, Stephen, Enfield, Nick, Gaby, Alice, and Majid, Asifa. 2004. "Reciprocals.". In Field Manual,Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics., 25-30. Nijmegen: Language & Cognition Group..

Simon Garrod Professor

Simon Garrod

Simon Garrod holds the Chair in Cognitive Psychology and is director of the INP Social Interactions Centre. His interests in psycholinguistics include reading, dialogue, and the evolution of language and communication. He was awarded the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the Society for Text and Discourse and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

Recent Publications

  1. Cultural evolution of language

    Bibliography

    Dediu, Dan, Cysouw, Michael, Levinson, Stephen C., Baronchelli, Andrea, Christiansen, Morten H., Croft, William, Evans, Nicholas, Garrod, Simon, Gray, Russell, and Kandler, Anne. 2013. "Cultural evolution of language". In Cultural Evolution: Society, Technology, Language, and Religion., 303–332. MIT Press.

  2. Applying the cultural ratchet to a social artefact: The cumulative cultural evolution of a language game

    Bibliography

    Nicolas Fay, Mark Ellison, Kristian Tylen, Riccardo Fusaroli, Bradley Walker, and Simon Garrod. 2018. "Applying the cultural ratchet to a social artefact: The cumulative cultural evolution of a language game." Evolution & Human Behavior. 39 (3): 300-309. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2018.02.002.

  3. Iconicity: From Sign To System In Human Communication and Language

    Bibliography

    Nicolas Fay, Mark Ellison, and Simon Garrod. December 2015. "Iconicity: From Sign To System In Human Communication and Language." Pragmatics & Cognition. 22 (2): 244-263. doi: 10.1075/pc.22.2.05fay.

Simon Greenhill Doctor

Simon Greenhill

Simon Greenhill's research focus is the evolution of languages and cultures. He has applied cutting-edge computational phylogenetic methods to language and cultural evolution, and used these methods to test hypotheses about human prehistory and cultural evolution in general. The questions he has explored so far include how people settled the Pacific, how language structure and complexity evolve, the co-evolution of cultural systems in the Pacific, and how cultural evolution can be modelled.

Recent Publications

  1. Population size and the rate of language evolution: a test across Indo-European, Austronesian and Bantu languages

    Bibliography

    Simon Greenhill, Xia Hua, Caela Welsh, Hilde Schneemann, and Lindell Bromham. 2018. "Population size and the rate of language evolution: a test across Indo-European, Austronesian and Bantu languages." Frontiers in Psychology. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00576.

  2. CHIELD: the causal hypotheses in evolutionary linguistics database

    Bibliography

    Sean Roberts, Anton Killin, Angarika Deb, Catherine Sheard, Simon Greenhill, Kaius Sinnemäki, José Segovia-Martín, Jonas Nölle, Aleksandrs Berdicevskis, Archie Humphreys-Balkwill, Hannah Little, Christopher Opie, Guillaume Jacques, Lindell Bromham, Peeter Tinits, Robert Ross, Sean Lee, Emily Gasser, Jasmine Calladine, Matthew Spike, Stephen Mann, Olena Shcherbakova, Ruth Singer, Shuya Zhang, Antonio Benítez-Burraco, Christian Kliesch, Ewan Thomas-Colquhoun, Hedvig Skirgard, Monica Tamariz, Sam Passmore, Thomas Pellard, and Fiona Jordan. 2020. "CHIELD: the causal hypotheses in evolutionary linguistics database." Journal of Language Evolution. doi: https://doi.org/10.1093/jole/lzaa001.

  3. Blowing in the wind: using North Wind and Sun texts to sample phoneme inventories.

    Bibliography

    Louise Baird, Nicholas Evans, and Simon Greenhill. 2020. "Blowing in the wind: using North Wind and Sun texts to sample phoneme inventories.." Submitted to JIPA..

  4. The Database of Cross-Linguistic Colexifications, reproducible analysis of cross-linguistic polysemies

    Bibliography

    Christoph Rzymski, Tiago Tresoldi, Simon Greenhill, Mei-Shun Wu, Nathanael Schweikhard, Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Volker Gast, Timotheus Bodt, Abbie Hantgan, Gereon Kaiping, Sophie Chang, Yunfan Lai, Natalia Morozova, Heini Arjava, Nataliia Hubler, Ezequiel Koile, Steve Pepper, Mariann Proos, Briana Van Epps, Ingrid Blanco, Carolin Hundt, Sergei Monakhov, Kristina Pianykh, Sallona Ramesh, Russell Gray, Robert Forkel, and Johann-Mattis List. 2020. "The Database of Cross-Linguistic Colexifications, reproducible analysis of cross-linguistic polysemies." Scientific Data. 7:

  5. Dated language phylogenies shed light on the ancestry of sino-tibetan

    Bibliography

    Laurent Sagart, Guillaume Jacques, Yunfan Lai, Robin Ryder, Valentin Thouzeau, Simon Greenhill, and Johann-Mattis List. 2019. "Dated language phylogenies shed light on the ancestry of sino-tibetan". In Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,

Nikolaus Himmelmann Professor

Nikolaus Himmelmann

Nikolaus Himmelmann has done fieldwork in the Philippines (Tagalog), Sulawesi (Tomin-Tolitoli languages) and East Timor (Waima’a) and published widely on a number of core issues in Austronesian grammar, including the nature of lexical and syntactic categories and voice.

Recent Publications

  1. Using Rapid Prosody Transcription to probe little-known prosodic systems: The case of Papuan Malay

    Bibliography

    Sonja Riesberg, Janina Kalbertodt, Stefan Baumann, and Nikolaus Himmelmann. 2020. "Using Rapid Prosody Transcription to probe little-known prosodic systems: The case of Papuan Malay." Laboratory Phonology: Journal of the Association for Laboratory Phonology. 11 (1): 1–35. doi: DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/labphon.192.

  2. Obituary. A life of polysynthesis: Hans-Jürgen Sasse (1943-2015)

    Bibliography

    Nicholas Evans, Nikolaus Himmelmann, and Dejan Matić. 2015. "Obituary. A life of polysynthesis: Hans-Jürgen Sasse (1943-2015)." Linguistic Typology. 19 (2): 327–335. doi: 10.1515/lingty-2015-0010.

  3. How universal is agent-first? Evidence from symmetrical voice languages

    Bibliography

    Sonja Riesberg, Kurt Malcher, and Nikolaus Himmelmann. 2019. "How universal is agent-first? Evidence from symmetrical voice languages." Language. 95 (3): 523-561.

  4. On the perception of prosodic prominences and boundaries in Papuan Malay

    Bibliography

    Riesberg, Sonja, Kalbertodt, Janina, Baumann, Stefan, and Himmelmann, Nikolaus. 2018. "On the perception of prosodic prominences and boundaries in Papuan Malay". In Perspectives on information structure in Austronesian languages, 389–414. Berlin: Language Science Press.

  5. Some preliminary observations on prosody and information structure in Austronesian languages of Indonesia and East Timor

    Bibliography

    Himmelmann, Nikolaus. 2018. "Some preliminary observations on prosody and information structure in Austronesian languages of Indonesia and East Timor". In Perspectives on information structure in Austronesian languages, 347–374. Berlin: Language Science Press.

Evan Kidd Associate Professor

Evan Kidd

  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Program: Processing (and Learning)
  • Institution: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics/The Australian National Unviersity

Evan Kidd is an Associate Professor in the Research School of Psychology at the ANU and is a Senior Investigator at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. He completed his PhD in Psycholinguistics at La Trobe University, and has held academic positions at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, The University of Manchester, and La Trobe University. His research concentrates on language acquisition and language processing across different languages and in different populations.

Recent Publications

  1. Individual differences in first language acquisition and their theoretical implications

    Bibliography

    Kidd, Evan, Bidgood, Amy, Donnelly, Seamus, Durrant, Samantha, Peter, Michelle, and Rowland, Caroline. 2020. "Individual differences in first language acquisition and their theoretical implications". In Current Perspectives on Child Language Acquisition, 189-219. John Benjamins.

  2. Measuring children’s auditory statistical learning via serial recall

    Bibliography

    Evan Kidd, Joanne Arciuli, Morten Christiansen, Erin Isbilen, Katherine Revius, and Michael Smithson. 2020. "Measuring children’s auditory statistical learning via serial recall." Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 200: 104964. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2020.104964.

  3. Individual Differences in Language Acquisition and Processing

    Bibliography

    Evan Kidd, Seamus Donnelly, and Morten Christiansen. 2017. "Individual Differences in Language Acquisition and Processing." Trends in Cognitive Science. 22 (2): 154-169. doi: 10.1016/j.tics.2017.11.006.

  4. Four-year-old Cantonese-speaking children's online processing of relative clauses: a permutation analysis

    Bibliography

    Angel Chan, Wenchun Yang, Franklin Chang, and Evan Kidd. 2017. "Four-year-old Cantonese-speaking children's online processing of relative clauses: a permutation analysis." Journal of Child Language. 45 (1): 174-203. doi: 10.1017/S0305000917000198.

  5. Language and culture

    Bibliography

    Kashima, Y, Kashima, E, and Kidd, Evan. 2014. "Language and culture". In The Oxford Handbook of Language and Social Psychology, 46-61. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Paul Maruff Professor

Paul Maruff

  • Title: Professor
  • Program: Processing/Technologies
  • Institution: Cogstate

Paul Maruff is one of the founders of Cogstate. He is a neuropsychologist with expertise in the identification and measurement of subtle behavioral and cognitive dysfunction. Paul's research integrates conventional and computerized neuropsychological testing with cognitive neuroscientific methods to guide decision making in drug development and in clinical medicine.

Recent Publications

  1. Monitoring change requires a rethink of assessment practices in voice and speech

    Bibliography

    Adam Vogel, and Paul Maruff. 07/2014. "Monitoring change requires a rethink of assessment practices in voice and speech." Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology. 39 (2): 56-61. doi: 10.3109/14015439.2013.775332.

Francesca Merlan Professor

Francesca Merlan

Francesca Merlan's research interests include: social transformation; indigeneity, nationalism, language and culture; theories of social action, organisation, and consciousness; modernity segmentary politics; exchange emergent identities; gender, social and cultural transformation in North Australia; the transformation of place-worlds among Aboriginal people; the building of Australian national identity in relation to indigeneity; land claims; applied anthropology; and sites and heritage issues. Her research covers many geographies and nationalities, including Australia; Papua New Guinea; and North America, particularly American Indian communities and surrounding (rural) communities and towns.

Recent Publications

  1. Living Larrimah: A reminiscence

    Bibliography

    Merlan, Francesca. 2020. "Living Larrimah: A reminiscence". In Ethnographer and Contrarian: Biographical and anthropological essays in honour of Peter Sutton, Adelaide: Wakefield Press.

  2. Obituary: Thomas Mitchell Ernst (1943–2016)

    Bibliography

    Alan Rumsey, and Francesca Merlan. 2017. "Obituary: Thomas Mitchell Ernst (1943–2016)." The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology. 18 (1): 87-88. doi: 10.1080/14442213.2017.1253433.

  3. Ku Waru Clause Chaining and the Acquisition of Complex Syntax

    Bibliography

    Alan Rumsey, Lauren Reed, and Francesca Merlan. 2020. "Ku Waru Clause Chaining and the Acquisition of Complex Syntax." Frontiers in Communication. 5: doi: doi: 10.3389/fcomm.2020.00019.

  4. Dalabon verb conjugations.

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas, and Merlan, Francesca. 2003. "Dalabon verb conjugations.". In The non-Pama-Nyungan languages of northern Australia: comparative studies of the continent’s most linguistically complex region., 269-283.

  5. A first dictionary of Dalabon (Ngalkbon)

    Bibliography

    Nicholas Evans, Francesca Merlan, and Maggie Tukumba. 2004. A first dictionary of Dalabon (Ngalkbon). Maningrida : ManingridaBawinanga Aboriginal Corporation..

Ilana Mushin Associate Professor

Ilana Mushin

Ilana Mushin has a long-standing interest in the management of knowledge in discourse. Her recent research has included epistemic stance-taking in Australian Aboriginal communities; grammatical description of Garrwa, a critically endangered Aboriginal language; and, more recently, on the English-based vernacular languages spoken by most Aboriginal people in Australia today.. She is the author of Evidentiality and Epistemological Stance: Narrative Retelling (John Benjamins, 2001) and A Grammar of (Western) Garrwa (Mouton De Gruyter, 2012) and co-editor of Discourse and Grammar in Australian Languages (with Brett Baker, John Benjamins, 2008).

Recent Publications

  1. Dis, that and da other: Variation in Aboriginal children's article and demonstrative use at school

    Bibliography

    Fraser, Henry, Mushin, Ilana, Meakins, Felicity, Gardner, Rod, Wigglesworth, Gillian, Simpson, Jane, and Vaughan, Jill. 2017. "Dis, that and da other: Variation in Aboriginal children's article and demonstrative use at school". In Language practices of Indigenous children and youth: the transition from home to school, 237-269. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

  2. Rethinking Australian Indigenous English-based speech varieties: Evidence from Woorabinda

    Bibliography

    Jennifer Munro, and Ilana Mushin. 2016. "Rethinking Australian Indigenous English-based speech varieties: Evidence from Woorabinda." Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages. 31 (1): 82-112. doi: 10.1075/jpcl.31.1.

  3. Same but different: Understanding language contact in Queensland Indigenous Settlements

    Bibliography

    Mushin, Ilana, Angelo, Denise, and Munro, Jennifer. 2016. "Same but different: Understanding language contact in Queensland Indigenous Settlements". In Land and language in the Cape York Peninsula and Gulf Country, 383-408. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

  4. Identifying the grammars of Queensland ex-Government reserves: The case of Woorie Talk

    Bibliography

    Mushin, Ilana, and Watts, Janet. 2016. "Identifying the grammars of Queensland ex-Government reserves: The case of Woorie Talk". In Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages since Colonisation, 57–86. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

  5. Establishing connections: a tale of two communities

    Bibliography

    Mushin, Ilana, and Gardner, Rod. 2016. "Establishing connections: a tale of two communities". In Doing research in communities, 105-114. Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge.

Carmel O’Shannessy Doctor

Carmel O’Shannessy

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape/Learning
  • Institution: Australian National Unviersity

Carmel O'Shannessy began a continuing appointment at ANU, in SLLL, CASS on July 1, coming to ANU from the University of Michigan. She will be continuing an NSF grant #1348013 on the Documentation and acquisition of Light Warlpiri and Warlpiri, and teaching in SLLL.

Carmel is currently documenting a newly emerged mixed language in northern Australia, Light Warlpiri, the emergence of which is the result of code-switching between an Australian language, Warlpiri, and English and Kriol (an English-lexified creole). Her current projects include diachronic changes in nominal case-marking from Warlpiri to Light Warlpiri, and grammaticalisation and innovation in the Light Warlpiri auxiliary system. Of particular interest is the role of children in grammaticalisation processes.

Recent Publications

  1. Talking together: how language documentation and teaching practice support oral language development in bilingual education programs

    Bibliography

    Samantha Disbray, Carmel O’Shannessy, Gretel MacDonald, and Barbara Martin. 2020. "Talking together: how language documentation and teaching practice support oral language development in bilingual education programs." International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. 23: doi: doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2020.1767535.

  2. In press: Language contact and change through child first language acquisition

    Bibliography

    O’Shannessy, Carmel, and Davidson, Lucinda. "In press: Language contact and change through child first language acquisition". In Handbook of Language Contact,

  3. Why do children lead contact-induced language change in some contexts but not others?

    Bibliography

    O’Shannessy, Carmel. 2019. "Why do children lead contact-induced language change in some contexts but not others?". In Language Contact, Continuity and Change in the Genesis of Modern Hebrew, 321–335. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Andrew Perfors Associate Professor

Andrew Perfors

Andrew is an Associate Professor and Deputy Director of the Complex Human Data Hub at the University of Melbourne. Andrew graduated from MIT in 2008 with a PhD in Brain & Cognitive Sciences. His research program spans concepts, decision-making and language, including hypothesis generation and testing, the representation and acquisition of complex concepts, the social assumptions underlying decision making and inference, language acquisition, linguistic and cognitive evolution, and statistical learning. To explore these issues he uses computational and primarily Bayesian mathematical models coupled with empirical work. His publications can be found in many of the premier journals in psychology, including Psychological Review, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Cognition, Cognitive Science, and Cognitive Psychology, and he has received extensive grant support from the ARC, including a DECRA and two Discovery Projects.

Luc Steels Professor

Luc Steels

Luc Steels studied linguistics at the University of Antwerp (Belgium) and computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA). His main research field is Artificial Intelligence covering a wide range of intelligent abilities, including vision, robotic behavior, conceptual representations and language. He founded the Sony Computer Science Laboratory in Paris in 1996 and became its first director. Currently he is ICREA research professor at the Institute for Evolutionary Biology (CSIC,UPF). During the past decade he has focused on theories for the origins and evolution of language using computer simulations and robotic experiments to discover and test them.

Jakelin Troy Professor

Jakelin Troy

  • Title: Professor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: University of Sydney

Jakelin Troy is a Ngarigu woman whose country is the Snowy Mountains of New South Wales, Australia. Her academic research is diverse but has a focus on languages and linguistics, anthropology and visual arts. She is particularly interested in Australian languages of New South Wales and ‘contact languages’. Her doctoral research was into the development of NSW Pidgin. Since 2001 Jakelin has been developing curricula for Australian schools with a focus on Australian language programs.

Adam Vogel Doctor

Adam Vogel

Adam leads the Speech Neuroscience Unit at the University of Melbourne where his team work towards improving speech, language and swallowing function in people with progressive and acquired neurological conditions. Adam’s group pursues rehabilitation and discovery research across two intertwined domains: (1) the first seeks to improve communication and swallowing in people with progressive neurological disorders (e.g., atypical dementia, hereditary ataxias); (2) the second exploits speech as a sensitive marker of central nervous system integrity to better understand the mechanisms underlying a range of neurological conditions (e.g., sleep disturbance, drug use, hearing impairment, depression).

Recent Publications

  1. Hello harlie: Enabling speech monitoring through chat-bot conversations

    Bibliography

    David Ireland, Christina Atay, Jacki Liddle, Dana Bradford, Helen Lee, Olivia Rushin, Thomas Mullins, Daniel Angus, Janet Wiles, Simon McBride, and Adam Vogel. 2016. "Hello harlie: Enabling speech monitoring through chat-bot conversations". In Digital Health Innovation for Consumers, Clinicians, Connectivity and Community - Selected Papers from the 24th Australian National Health Informatics Conference, HIC 2016, 55-60. Melbourne, Australia.

  2. Can a smartphone-based chatbot engage older community group members? The impact of specialised content

    Bibliography

    Christina Atay, David Ireland, Jacki Liddle, Janet Wiles, Adam Vogel, Daniel Angus, Dana Bradford, Alana Campbell, Olivia Rushin, and Helen Chenery. 2016. "Can a smartphone-based chatbot engage older community group members? The impact of specialised content." Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. 12 (7): 1005-1006. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2016.06.2070.

  3. Monitoring change requires a rethink of assessment practices in voice and speech

    Bibliography

    Adam Vogel, and Paul Maruff. 07/2014. "Monitoring change requires a rethink of assessment practices in voice and speech." Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology. 39 (2): 56-61. doi: 10.3109/14015439.2013.775332.

Brendan Weekes Professor

Brendan Weekes

Brendan Weekes is an experimental psychologist who studies the psychology of language and memory – specifically word recognition and recall. He examines cognitive processes using cross-linguistic, neuropsychological and brain imaging methods. His research can be applied to understanding problems in clinical neuropsychology including bilingual aphasia, dementia and reading difficulties. He is Chair in Communication Science at the University of Hong Kong and Director of the Communication Science Laboratory at HKU, where he has been since 2010. Prior 2010, he was a Reader in Experimental Psychology at the University of Sussex for ten years.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University