Instructors

Dr Rosey Billington

Dr Rosey Billington

  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Rosey is a postdoctoral fellow in the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language at the University of Melbourne, undertaking research at the intersection of experimental phonetics and language documentation. Her current primary project focuses on the segmental and prosodic patterns of Nafsan and closely-related Oceanic languages of central Vanuatu. Her doctoral research focused on the phonetics and phonology of Lopit, an Eastern Nilotic language of South Sudan, including analyses of tonal contrasts used for lexical and grammatical distinctions. She is also involved in projects on phonetic and phonological patterns in Australian English and Bislama, a creole language of Vanuatu.

Dr Reuben Brown

Dr Reuben Brown

  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Reuben Brown is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Research Unit for Indigenous Arts and Cultures at the University of Melbourne. Brown, who received his PhD in 2017 from The University of Sydney, conducts research on the public ceremony of western Arnhem Land and the Pilbara as sites of intercultural exchange, and the role of digital environments in facilitating intergenerational transmission of language, song, and dance.

Rona Charles

  • Institution: Winungarri Aboriginal Corporation
Josh Clothier

Josh Clothier

  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Josh is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne. His doctoral research focuses on sociophonetic variability in Australian English, specifically as it relates to fine phonetical detail in consonants and vowels, and ethnic identities of Australians with Lebanese heritage. He has been using R since 2009, when he started learning the R language due to the requirements of his honours studies. Now, he quite enjoys coding in R and is always finding more uses for it. Apart from the important things like data visualisation, signal processing, and statistical modelling, he gets excited about some of the simpler things it can do, like batch renaming files, and copying files from one (possibly unknown) directory to another.

Prof Bill Croft

Prof Bill Croft

  • Institution: The University of New Mexico

William Croft received his Ph.D. in 1986 at Stanford University under Joseph Greenberg. He has taught at the Universities of Michigan, Manchester (UK) and New Mexico, and has been a visiting scholar at the Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics (Niijmegen, the Netherlands) the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (Leipzig, Germany), and at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He has written several books, including Typology and Universals, Explaining Language Change, Radical Construction Grammar, Cognitive Linguistics [with D. Alan Cruse] and Verbs: Aspect and Causal Structure. He is currently working on his next book, Morphosyntax: Constructions of the World’s Languages. His primary research areas are typology, semantics, construction grammar and language change. He has argued that grammatical structure can only be understood in terms of the variety of constructions used to express functions across languages; that both qualitative and quantitative methods are necessary for grammatical analysis; and that the study of language structure must be situated in the dynamics of evolving conventions of language use in social interaction.

Dr Rebecca Defina

Dr Rebecca Defina

  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Rebecca Defina is a CoEDL Postdoctoral researcher at the University of Melbourne carrying out a longitudinal study of Pitjantjatjara language acquisition. She received her PhD degree from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics where she investigated relationships between linguistic and conceptual event representations using a range of behavioural experiments and gesture analysis.

John Divili

  • Institution: Winun Ngari Aboriginal Corporation

John Divilli (Ngarinyin) is an emerging singer and cultural leader from the west Kimberley. Divilli uses audio collections to assist in his practice-led research into Junba singing traditions following his grandfather, the master composer Scotty Nyalgodi Martin. Divilli works as a Research Assistant on the ARC project ‘Singing the Future’ and as a ranger for the Western Australian Department of Parks and Wildlife.

Harley Dunolly Lee

  • Institution: Living Languages (formerly RNLD)

Harley Dunolly-Lee is a Guli person who speaks the Dja Dja Wurrung language. Harley is the community linguist and researcher at the VACL (Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages). Harley has a Bachelor Degree in the Arts which had a focus of Linguistics, Archaeology and Indigenous Studies and a Bachelor of Arts Honours degree in Linguistics. Harley has been working with VACL as a community member for about 11 years. Most of these years was spent learning how to speak Dja Dja Wurrung and other Kulin languages.

Prof Diana Eades

Prof Diana Eades

  • Institution: University of New England

Dr Diana Eades FAHA (Adjunct Professor, University of New England) is a critical sociolinguist whose main research examines communication with, to and about Australian Aboriginal speakers of English in the legal process. Her books include Aboriginal English and the Law (1992, Queensland Law Society), Courtroom Talk and Neocolonial Control (2008, Mouton de Gruyter) Sociolinguistics and the Legal Process (2010, Multilingual Matters) Aboriginal Ways of Using English (2013, Aboriginal Studies Press) and Discursive Constructions of Consent in the Legal Process (2016, Cambridge University Press, co-edited). Diana has provided expert evidence in criminal and civil cases in courts and tribunals in three states and the Northern Territory, and is a past President of the International Association of Forensic Linguists.

Sharon Edgar-Jones

Sharon Edgar-Jones

  • Institution: Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity (RNLD)

Sharon Edgar-Jones is an Aboriginal woman from the Hunter Valley of NSW working towards reclamation and revival of her heritage languages – Gathang language and Wonnarua language (HRLM). She has been developing a Wanarruwa beginners guide, in collaboration with linguists James Wafer and Albert Burgman due for publication this year. She teaches Gathang Language to Aboriginal school students and has been a co- trainer at Puliima and RNLD workshops.

Ben Foley

Ben Foley

  • Institution: The University of Queensland

Ben Foley is project manager of the Transcription Acceleration Project (TAP), an initiative of the ARC-funded Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language. TAP brings cutting-edge machine learning technology within reach of people working with some of the world's oldest languages, by optimising workflows and supporting the development of new transcription tools.

Katie Jepson

Katie Jepson

  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Katie submitted her PhD thesis at the University of Melbourne in 2019. In her doctoral research, Katie investigated aspects of the phonetics of Djambarrpuyŋu, an Australian Indigenous language, with a focus on prosodic structure and the effects of prosody on the acoustics of consonants and vowels. She enjoys working with large datasets and has a considerable interest in presenting linguistic data visually in clear and interesting ways. R allows her to do these things and she now has substantial experience in using R for data visualisation, sophisticated statistical analyses including running Linear Mixed Effects models and Generalised Additive Mixed models, and creating databases for linguistic analysis. Katie remembers the hiccups in first approaching R, but now sees R as an important tool in a linguist’s set.

Prof Trevor Johnston

Prof Trevor Johnston

  • Institution: Macquarie University

Trevor Johnston is Adjunct Professor of Sign Language Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University. He has researched Auslan (Australian Sign Language) since the early 1980s concentrating on lexicography, grammatical description, bilingual deaf education, and corpus linguistics both for research into sociolinguistic variation and for empirical language description. He has authored several dictionaries of Auslan (in book, CD-ROM and internet formats) and papers describing the grammar of Auslan, signed language lexicography, sign bilingual education, sociolinguistic variation and signed language transcription. Professor Johnston has presented and taught in academic and public domains in the field of sign linguistics, language policy, and professional development for teachers of Auslan. He has also conducted research in the area Auslan assessment, especially as a first language, in the evaluation of sign bilingual education programs, and on sociolinguistic variation in Auslan.

Dr Jared Kuvent

  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Jared Kuvent is a Research Associate specialising in Community Technology in the Research Unit for Indigenous Arts and Cultures at the University of Melbourne. Kuventis a graduate of the Masters of Arts and Community Practice (MACP) program at the Victorian College of the Arts and has a background in communit arts, digital asset archives, multimedia, and animation working at Nickolodeon and Siggraph.

Emma Murphy

Emma Murphy

  • Institution: Living Languages (formerly RNLD)

Emma Murphy in a non-Aboriginal linguist, and directs the Training Program at Living Languages (formerly RNLD). She has worked with Aboriginal communities across Australia for 20 years, in language, cultural heritage and community development work. As part of her role at RNLD, Emma delivers training in linguistics and language teaching to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people around the country.

Prof Janet Fletcher

Prof Janet Fletcher

  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Janet Fletcher is Professor of Phonetics in the School of Languages and Linguistics. She has held previous appointments at the University of Edinburgh, the Ohio State University, and Macquarie University. Her research interests include phonetic theory, laboratory phonology, prosodic phonology, articulatory and acoustic modelling of prosodic effects in various languages. She is currently working on phonetic variation, and prosody, and intonation in Indigenous Australian languages and has commenced projects on selected languages of Oceania. She is a member of the Research Unit for Indigenous Language in the School of Languages and Linguistics.

Dr Debbie Loakes

Dr Debbie Loakes

  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Deborah (Debbie) is a phonetician at The University of Melbourne. She has been working on both Indigenous languages and Australian English, and has most recently carried out collaborative work on prosody in Mawng, and has also carried out postdoctoral research focusing on a sound change (a vowel merger) in Australian English. Debbie's postdoctoral project for the Centre of Excellence is a sociophonetic study of Aboriginal English, bringing together an analysis of speech production, speech perception, and social factors. Participants will be (English L1) Indigenous people from Warrnambool, where the vowel merger occurs in the Anglo-Celtic community. Debbie is particularly interested in whether this merger is present in production and perception for the minority Indigenous community. Ultimately the project will use fine-grained phonetic analyses to feed into a deeper understanding of language shape, processing and evolution (and their interaction).

Prof Marianne Mithun

Prof Marianne Mithun

  • Institution: University of California, Santa Barbara

Marianne Mithun is Professor of Linguistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, USA. Among her interests are morphology, syntax, discourse, prosody, and their interrelations; language contact and language change; typology and universals; language documentation; and languages indigenous to North America and Austronesia. She is President-elect of the Linguistic Society of America.

Dr Sally Akevai Nicholas

Dr Sally Akevai Nicholas

  • Institution: Massey University

Dr Ake (Sally Akevai) Nicholas is a lecturer in Linguistics at Massey University in Auckland, New Zealand. Her research focusses on the description, documentation, and revitalisation of her ancestral language; Cook Islands Māori. She also works on matters of linguistic justice, and language revitalisation more broadly. Ake has a particular interest in how young people can be encouraged to learn and use their ancestral languages.

Amy Parncutt

Amy Parncutt

  • Institution: Living Languages (previously RNLD)

Amy Parncutt is a non-Indigenous linguist and trainer at Living Languages (previously RNLD). In this role, she has worked with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across Australia for the past 3 years, providing training and support to people working on their languages. This involves training in linguistics, language teaching, language documentation, and other skills and knowledge to support people to bring their languages back or keep their languages strong. Amy grew up in Sydney, currently lives in Melbourne, but calls Brisbane home.

Dr Amy Perfors

Dr Amy Perfors

  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Amy Perfors is an Associate Professor in the School of Psychological Sciences at Melbourne University and Deputy Director of the Complex Human Data Hub. After receiving her PhD in Brain & Cognitive Sciences from MIT, Perfors moved from the US to Australia in 2008 and to Melbourne in 2017. Her research focuses on many questions in higher-order cognition generally, including questions involving language learning, language evolution, and the interaction between language and categorisation. Her approach combines computational modelling with behavioural experiments, and takes place within a theoretical framework which suggests that human inference can be explained as a byproduct of reasoning about where the data came from and how it was generated.

Alina Rakhi

Alina Rakhi

  • Institution: The University of Queensland

Alina has been trained an Electronics & Telecommunication Engineer, with experience as an academic & facilitator in Communications, Networking & Data engineering. Following research into Multimodal Features & Patterns, she is now engaged as a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Queensland within Transcription Acceleration project, CoEDL & Co-Innovation Research group (Prof. Janet Wiles).

Dr Martin Schweinberger

Dr Martin Schweinberger

  • Institution: The University of Queensland

Dr. Martin Schweinberger is currently a postdoctoral Research Fellow in Language Technologies at the University of Queensland, Australia. Martin studied English philology, Philosophy, and Psychology at Universität Kassel, Germany, and the National University of Ireland, Galway. After obtaining his PhD in English linguistics in 2011 from Universität Hamburg, Germany, he worked as research assistant, lecturer, and interim professor for English linguistics at several German universities. In his last position before migrating to Australia, Martin was part of the Language Technology Group at the Computer Science department of Hamburg University where he headed a project on (semi-)automatic speech processing. Martin has specialized in computational approaches to analysing language data with a particular focus on corpus linguistics and quantitative analyses.

Dr Hywel Stoakes

  • Institution: The University of Auckland
Andrew Tanner

Andrew Tanner

  • Institution: Living Languages (previously RNLD)

Andrew Tanner is a non-Indigenous linguist who in the last 3 years has been delivering training in linguistics, language documentation and language learning to Aboriginal people across Australia as a trainer at Living Languages/RNLD in Melbourne. Andrew studied Linguistics at Melbourne University and wrote his Postgrad Dip thesis on cross-generational language maintenance amongst the Tatars of Adelaide, and has published research on the analysis of co-narrated storytelling. Originally from Tasmania, Andrew is also a musician and former ESL teacher who has spent many years working and travelling in Russia.

Associate Professor Sally Treloyn

  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Sally Treloyn is an Associate Professor in ethnomusicology, Co-director of the Research Unit for Indigenous Arts and Cultures and an ARC Future Fellow at The University of Melbourne. Treloyn has conducted research on the public dance-song genres of the Kimberley since 1999 and specialises in applied ethnomusicology, music sustainability, databases and repatriation. 

Prof James Walker

Prof James Walker

  • Institution: La Trobe University

James Walker is Professor of Language Diversity at La Trobe University. He completed his PhD in Linguistics at the University of Ottawa in 2000 and was Professor of Linguistics at York University (Toronto) until 2017. He has taught courses in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China and the United Kingdom. His research area is sociolinguistic variation and change, mainly in varieties of English and English-based creole, but he has also worked on Sango (Central African Republic), Swedish and Brazilian Portuguese. His interests include all aspects of language variation, especially in situations of language contact.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University