Instructors

Session: Information theory and human language

Time: Friday, 9.00 - 12.30

John Mansfield

John Mansfield

John Mansfield is a Lecturer in Linguistics at the University of Melbourne. He researches processes of language change, especially in morphology and phonology, and with a particular interest in how social change can shape language change. John has worked extensively with linguistically diverse Aboriginal communities in northern Australia.

Charles Kemp

Charles Kemp

Charles Kemp works in the school of Psychological Sciences at the University of Melbourne. His research focuses on computational models of learning, reasoning and communication, and his interest in categorisation across cultures has led to a line of work that connects with questions in linguistic typology.  Much of this work aims to understand ways in which languages support efficient communication.

 

Session: Studying variation and change in spontaneous speech corpora

Time: Friday, 9.00 - 12.30

Catherine Travis

Catherine Travis

Catherine Travis is Professor Modern European Languages in the School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics at the Australian National University, and a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language. Her research addresses questions related to linguistic and social factors impacting on language variation and change, in particular in socially diverse communities. She has conducted large-scale corpus-based projects on Spanish spoken in Colombia, Spanish-English bilingualism in New Mexico, USA, and, currently, Australian English through the Sydney Speaks project.

Benjamin Purser

Benjamin Purser

Benjamin Purser has been lead research assistant on the Sydney Speaks project since 2014, and is a graduate of the Australian National University (PhB, Hons. I, University Medal). He co-authored a paper on dialect coaching of Australian English with Sydney Speaks colleagues (Purser, Grama, and Travis, 2020). He was Senior Research Officer on the ARC-funded AusKidTalk project, and currently tutors undergraduate linguistics at Macquarie University. He is studying a Master of Speech Pathology at the University of Sydney, and freelances as a linguistic researcher and dialect/voice coach.

 

Session: How to start collecting child language acquisition data and what to do with it

Time: Friday, 1.30 - 5.00

Lucy Davidson

Lucy Davidson

Lucy Davidson is a CoEDL postdoctoral research fellow in the Research Unit for Indigenous Language at the University of Melbourne. Her primary research interest relates children’s communication in development and strategies children use to pursue social actions with peers. In her current role, Lucy works in Wadeye, investigating narratives produced by children in middle childhood. She also works with the Aboriginal communities Pipalyatjara and Kalka, in central Australia, to study young children’s acquisition of Pitjantjatjara.

Rebecca Defina

Rebecca Defina

Rebecca Defina is a CoEDL research fellow and Research Unit for Indigenous Language researcher at the University of Melbourne. Her research focuses on linguistic description and the connections between language structure and the ways people think. Her PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (Netherlands) examined connections between syntax and conceptual event segmentation in Avatime (Ghana, West Africa). Her current work focuses on how children learn Pitjantjatjara. This research features the collection and analysis of a 3-year longitudinal corpus of 13 Pitjantjatjara children aged 1-7 interacting with their families.  

Barbara Kelly

Barbara Kelly

Barbara Kelly is an Associate Professor in Linguistics at the University of Melbourne. Barb is intrigued by interactions of language and gesture in carer-child multi-modal communication practices across vastly different languages and cultures including in remote Himalayan communities, remote Indigenous Australian communities, and urban industrialised settings. Her current research investigates the acquisition of Murrinhpatha. 

Evan Kidd

Evan Kidd

Evan Kidd is an Associate Professor of Psychology at The Australian National University, and a Senior Investigator at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. His research focuses on language acquisition and language processing, including the socio-cognitive skills that underlie these processes.

 

Session: Computations methods of linguistic typology

Time: Friday, 1.30 - 5.00

Matt Carroll

Matthew J Carroll

Matt is a Research Fellow at the CoEDL ANU node and a visiting fellow at the Surrey Morphology Group where he held a Newton International Fellowship. He researches the extent, emergence and maintenance of morphological complexity using traditional qualitative linguistics enhanced with computational methodologies. Matt also works extensively with speakers of Yam family languages in West Papua.

 

Session: Evolutionary modelling of population-levellanguage variation and change

Time: Saturday, 9.00 - 12.30

Felicity Meakins

Felicity Meakins

Felicity Meakins is an ARC Future Fellow in Linguistics at the University of Queensland and a CI in the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language. She is a field linguist who specialises in the documentation of First Nations languages in northern Australia and the effect of English on these languages. She has worked as a community linguist as well as an academic over the past 20 years, facilitating language revitalisation programs, consulting on Native Title claims and conducting research into First Nations languages. She has compiled a number of dictionaries and grammars and has written numerous papers on language change in Australia.

Lindell Bromham

Lindell Bromham

Lindell Bromham is an evolutionary biologist whose research spans from the determinants of mutation rate to the generation of global biodiversity. Lindell has written several textbooks on molecular evolution and macroevolution, and has published over one hundred peer-reviewed research articles across a diversity of fields including evolutionary biology, conservation biology, philosophy, virology, and education. Recently, Lindell has been working with linguists to develop new ways of examining the patterns and process of language change, and global patterns of language diversity and endangerment. www.TempoAndMode.com www.MacroEvoEco.com

Xia Hua

Xia Hua

Xia Hua is an ARC DECRA Fellow in the Mathematical Sciences Institute at the Australian National University. She is a mathematical biologist who specialises in population genetics and phylogenetics. Her current research focuses on the link between micro-level and macro-level evolution. She has been working on three evolving systems to understand this link: biological evolution, language evolution, and galactic chemical evolution. She has adapted mathematical and statistical models from population genetics and genome-wide association studies to study language change in a speaker community.

 

Session: Phrase-based leanguage learning resource creation and documentation with the Listen N Talk app

Time: Saturday, 9.00 - 12.30

Mark Richards

Mark Richards

Mark Richards is a postdoctoral fellow in language technologies for education at the MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development, at the Western Sydney University node of CoEDL. Mark’s PhD investigated the repurposing of archival recordings to support independent adult learning of Mangarrayi, an endangered language in the Roper River region of the Northern Territory, using a phrase-based approach. Since 2020, he has worked with the Jilkminggan community, eLearn Australia and CoEDL researchers from WSU and UQ to develop the Listen N Talk app to facilitate the learning and revitalisation of Indigenous languages.

 Caroline Jones

Caroline Jones

Caroline Jones has research interests in language learning, language revitalisation, and language technologies. Caroline has worked with Aboriginal people in NSW and NT on language projects for over 25 years. In CoEDL Caroline has been involved in projects to create and evaluate new language technologies (e.g., WordSpinner software to make talking dictionaries, Listen N Talk app), and to create new language- and culture-fair assessment tools for assessing and tracking progress in language development in Australian children from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Caroline is based in the MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development at Western Sydney University, where she is also WSU Discipline Leader for Languages, Linguistics and Interpreting & Translation.

 

Session: Documenting multilingual contexts: working with communities to analyse multilingual practices and language ideologies

Time: Saturday, 1.30 - 5.00

Ruth Singer

Ruth Singer

Ruth Singer is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the Research Unit for Indigenous Languages and the Centre for the Dynamics of Language (COEDL), University of Melbourne, Australia. She researches multilingualism with Warruwi Community, an Indigenous community in northern Australia. Together they look at the role of Indigenous languages in the community. With Warruwi and other nearby communities in Arnhem Land, she is investigating how regional ways of being multilingual have contributed to the high levels of linguistic diversity in western Arnhem land over time.

Jill Vaughan

Jill Vaughan

Jill Vaughan is a research fellow at the University of Melbourne’s Research Unit for Indigenous Language. Her work centres on the sociolinguistics of multilingualism, and seeks to understand how and why multilingual and multilectal speakers draw on their different codes to express their place in the world. In exploring these questions, she engages in research on multilingual practices, migration, language variation and change, and language in the classroom. Her current work is centred on fieldwork and community language support in the linguistically diverse and highly multilingual region of Arnhem Land (northern Australia).

 

Transcription acceleration with Elpis (Saturday, 1.30 - 5.00)

Ben Foley

Ben Foley

Ben Foley is the project manager of CoEDL's Transcription Acceleration Project (TAP). TAP is exploring the application of technologies in aspects of language work, to reduce the tedium of certain tasks such as transcribing, helping to mine data archives, and enabling more of the world's languages to be used in a digital space. Ben's previous experience with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language resource development has resulted in apps and websites galore, including the Iltyem-iltyem sign language database and website, and the Gambay First Languages Map, documenting community-preferred locations for the hundreds of languages in Australia.

Nicholas Lambourne

Nicholas Lambourne

Nicholas Lambourne is a data engineer at Canva and a research assistant attached to the Transcription Acceleration Project (TAP), a CoEDL initiative run out of the University of Queensland, where he recently graduated with a degree in computer science. His work with TAP focuses on Elpis, a tool designed to bring the power of automatic speech recognition to any community, no matter their technical background.

Matthew Low

Matthew Low

Matthew Low is a fourth-year undergraduate computer science, mathematics and statistics student at UQ. He is a full-stack web developer at Atlassian, as well as a research assistant in CoEDL, with a focus on the development of Elpis, a project aimed at enabling cutting-edge transcription for those without much background in speech engineering.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University