Research Fellows

See our Vacancies page for current and upcoming postdoctoral opportunities.

Postdoctoral Fellows

Andrew Back

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Technology/Evolution
  • Institution: University of Queensland

Commenced in 2017

Danielle Barth Doctor

Danielle Barth

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape/Learning
  • Institution: The Australian National University - on maternity leave 2017

Danielle Barth has completed her PhD at the University of Oregon where her research has investigated the interface between syntax, phonetics and information theory. In her research she uses empirical data drawn from corpora, experiments and descriptive fieldwork. At the Centre she'll be working on building a multilingual corpus built from data collected by multiple researchers on 12-15 languages from around the world. Her project will focus on finding, describing and comparing inter- and intra-language variation as it relates to the expression of social cognition, using descriptive and quantitative methodologies. She is also looking forward to returning to her fieldsite in Matukar, Papua New Guinea so that Matukar Panau, the language spoken there, can be added to the sample of languages for the social cognition typology project.

Recent Publications

  1. SCOPIC Design and Overview

    Bibliography

    Barth, Danielle, and Evans, Nicholas. 2017. "SCOPIC Design and Overview". In Social Cognition Parallax Interview Corpus (SCOPIC), 1-21. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press.

  2. The Social Cognition Parallax Interview Corpus (SCOPIC)

    Bibliography

    Danielle Barth, and Nicholas Evans. 2017. The Social Cognition Parallax Interview Corpus (SCOPIC). Honolulu : University of Hawai'i Press.

Timothy Brickell Doctor

Timothy Brickell

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape/Archiving
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Tim is working on the project “Tonsawang: a collaborative multimedia project documenting an endangered language of North Sulawesi.” The focus of this project is to undertake documentation work on Tonsawang, an endangered and undocumented language of North Sulawesi, Indonesia. The once isolated Tonsawang speech community has been shifting to Manado Malay since the 20th century, and much more rapidly so since the early 2000s. This project will collect, collate, annotate, and archive high quality audio/video of culturally relevant linguistic data from a wide range of communicative events. Prioritising close collaboration and training with Tonswang speech community members, the resulting data will be open access archived to allow for further use for documentary, descriptive, and maintenance purposes. The project is funded by ELDP at The University of London/SOAS.

Recent Publications

  1. Do grammatical relations reflect information status? Reassessing Preferred Argument Structure theory against discourse data from Tondano

    Bibliography

    Timothy Brickell, and Stefan Schnell. 2017. "Do grammatical relations reflect information status? Reassessing Preferred Argument Structure theory against discourse data from Tondano." Linguistic Typology. 21 (1): 177-208.

Don Daniels Doctor

Don Daniels

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The Australian National University

Don conducts fieldwork on Papuan languages in Madang Province, Papua New Guinea. His work focuses on documentation, description, and comparative reconstruction, and he has conducted extensive research on the Sogeram family of languages, spoken in central Madang. He is now engaged in a new project with the Minjim language family which will focus on the documentation of three undescribed Minjim languages and the reconstruction of Proto-Minjim. More information about his research is available on his website.

Recent Publications

  1. Gants is a Sogeram language

    Bibliography

    Don Daniels. 2017. "Gants is a Sogeram language." Language and Linguistics in Melanesia. 35: 82-93.

  2. Magɨ: An Undocumented Language of Papua New Guinea

    Bibliography

    Don Daniels. June 2016. "Magɨ: An Undocumented Language of Papua New Guinea." Oceanic Linguistics. 55 (1): 199-224.

Rebecca Defina

Rebecca Defina

  • Program: Learning
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Rebecca joins the Centre from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen. For her PhD there, she investigated relationships between linguistic and conceptual event representations, with a particular focus on serial verb constructions in Avatime (a Kwa language spoken in Ghana). Her research incorporated a range of methods including linguistic description, gesture analysis, and behavioural experiments in order to study the relationships between language and thought within different ways of thinking.

She is now carrying out a longitudinal study of acquisition in Pitjantjatjara. For this project, she will be developing a corpus of naturalistic language use and narratives from children and their caregivers. She will also be continuing her work on event segmentation, looking at how Pitjantjatjara children learn to use complex predicates and how the alignment between syntactic, gestural, and conceptual event units develops.

Greg Dickson Doctor

Greg Dickson

Greg Dickson has lived and worked in the Katherine Region of the Northern Territory for over a decade — a region that is a hotspot for endangered languages, where most remote Aboriginal people now speak a creole or mixed language. His PhD thesis, recently completed through the Australian National University, considered one of those endangered languages, Marra, and observed the degree to which the lexicon of Kriol demonstrates a transfer (or lack thereof) of lexical material and related cultural denotata. His current research project with the Centre of Excellence will capture well-known but under-described geographic variation found across Kriol speaking communities, with a particular focus on the area east of Katherine.

Recent Publications

  1. Rethinking the substrates of Roper River Kriol: the case of Marra

    Bibliography

    Dickson, Greg. 2016. "Rethinking the substrates of Roper River Kriol: the case of Marra". In Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages since Colonisation, 145-173. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

  2. Rethinking the substrates of Roper River Kriol: the case of Marra

    Bibliography

    Dickson, Greg. 2016. "Rethinking the substrates of Roper River Kriol: the case of Marra". In Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages Since Contact, 145-173. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Samantha Disbray Doctor

Samantha Disbray

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The Australian National University

Samantha Disbray has worked as a community and research linguist in the vibrant and dynamic language ecology of Central Australia for almost 20 years. Samantha has worked with speakers of Warumungu, an endangered language spoken in Tennant Creek and compiled a learner’s dictionary. She has investigated child language input and development in Tennant Creek and the contemporary contact language Wumpurrarni English. Her doctoral thesis was a developmental study of reference in children’s Wumpurrarni English narrations. More recently she has researched languages in education, particularly the Northern Territory Bilingual Education Program. She continues to work closely with Warlpiri educators and education activists. In her current project she is working once again with speakers of Warumungu and Wumpurrarni English, repatriating historical Warumungu recordings and preparing a corpus of texts, a dictionary and learning materials.

Recent Publications

  1. ‘Red Dirt’ Schools and Pathways into Higher Education

    Bibliography

    Guenther, John, Disbray, Samantha, Benveniste, Tessa, and Osborne, Sam. 2017. "‘Red Dirt’ Schools and Pathways into Higher Education". In Indigenous Pathways, Transitions and Participation in Higher Education, Singapore: Springer.

  2. A Thematic History of Bilingual Education in the Northern Territory

    Bibliography

    Devlin, Brian, Disbray, Samantha, and Devlin, Nancy. 2017. "A Thematic History of Bilingual Education in the Northern Territory". In History of bilingual education in the Northern Territory: People, programs and policies, 1-10. Singapore: Springer.

  3. Policy and Practice Now

    Bibliography

    Disbray, Samantha. 2017. "Policy and Practice Now". In History of bilingual education in the Northern Territory: People, programs and policies, 237-246. Singapore: Springer.

  4. Consolidation, power through leadership and pedagogy, and the rise of accountability, 1980-1998

    Bibliography

    Devlin, Brian, and Disbray, Samantha. 2017. "Consolidation, power through leadership and pedagogy, and the rise of accountability, 1980-1998". In History of bilingual education in the Northern Territory: People, programs and policies, 101-112. Singapore: Springer.

  5. Imposed solutions versus local aspirations: Two recent policy decisions affecting remote education in the Northern Territory

    Bibliography

    Devlin, Brian, Disbray, Samantha, and Devlin, Nancy. 2017. "Imposed solutions versus local aspirations: Two recent policy decisions affecting remote education in the Northern Territory". In "... and there'll be NO dancing". Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Governmental Policy Impacting Indigenous Australia since 2007., 264-288. Newcastle upon Tyre: Cambridge Scholars Publising.

Seamus Donnelly Doctor

Seamus Donnelly

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Processing
  • Institution: The Australian National Unviersity

Seamus received his PhD in Educational Psychology from the City University of New York in 2016. His dissertation research was a meta-analysis of studies comparing monolinguals and bilinguals on executive control tasks. He came to CoeDL to work under the supervision of Dr. Evan Kidd on the Canberra Longitudinal Child Language Project. His current research interests include usage-based approaches to the study of language acquisition and statistical methods for analyzing longitudinal and eye-tracking data.

Recent Publications

  1. Assessing the impact of conversational overlap in content on child language growth

    Bibliography

    Elizabeth Che, Patricia Brooks, Maria Alarcon, Francis Yannaco, and Seamus Donnelly. 2017. "Assessing the impact of conversational overlap in content on child language growth." Journal of Child Language. 1-25. doi: 10.1017/S0305000917000083.

  2. Empirical logit analysis is not logistic regression

    Bibliography

    Seamus Donnelly. 2017. "Empirical logit analysis is not logistic regression." Journal of Memory and Language. 94: 28-42. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jml.2016.10.005.

  3. Second-­language lexical knowledge benefits first-­language lexical retrieval

    Bibliography

    Seamus Donnelly, Eve Higby, and Jungmee Yoon. 2016. "Second-­language lexical knowledge benefits first-­language lexical retrieval". In International Workshop on Language Production, La Jolla, CA USA.

  4. A Beneficial Effect of Orthography on Native Spanish Speakers' Ability to Distinguish Non-Native Phonemic Contrasts

    Bibliography

    Seamus Donnelly, Eve Higby, Katharine Miles, Desiret Nuesi, and Andrea Monge. November 2016. "A Beneficial Effect of Orthography on Native Spanish Speakers' Ability to Distinguish Non-Native Phonemic Contrasts". In Psychonomic Society Annual Meeting 2016, Boston, USA.

Gautier Durantin Doctor

Gautier Durantin

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Technology (and Evolution)
  • Institution: University of Queensland

Gautier Durantin is a post-doctoral research fellow with the University of Queensland, under the supervision of Prof Janet Wiles. He received his Ph.D in Neuroscience and Signal Processing from the French Institute of Aeronautics and Space in October 2015, and joined CoEDL in February 2016. His interests include the understanding of user engagement dynamics in human-machine interaction (in the OPAL child-friendly robot project), and the development of signal processing methods to produce adaptive systems from speech, touch, or physiological signals.

Recent Publications

  1. Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction

    Bibliography

    Scott Heath, Gautier Durantin, Marie Boden, Kristyn Hensby, Jonathan Taufatofua, Ola Olsson, Paul Pounds, Jason Weigel, and Janet Wiles. 2017. "Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction." Frontiers in Robotics and AI. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/frobt.2017.00027.

  2. Social Moments: A Perspective on Interaction for Social Robotics

    Bibliography

    Gautier Durantin, Scott Heath, and Janet Wiles. 2017. "Social Moments: A Perspective on Interaction for Social Robotics." Frontiers in Robotics and AI. (4): 24. doi: doi: 10.3389/frobt.2017.00024.

Cris Edmonds-Wathen

Cris Edmonds-Wathen

  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Cris Edmonds-Wathen researches how mathematics is expressed in different languages. She has recently been working on a project to improve the teaching of mathematics in Papua New Guinea by helping elementary teachers to draw on local languages and culture. She has also been working on the comparison of mathematics tasks in different languages, during a postdoc at Umea University, Sweden. For her PhD she investigated spatial language in Iwaidja, a language of northern Australia.

In her current postdoctoral position at the Research Unit for Indigenous Language, she will further investigate the relationship between mathematics education and language in remote indigenous communities. Key questions that shape this research are: What mathematical concepts do young indigenous language speaking children learn in their everyday life? How does their mathematical understanding correspond or not correspond with assumed learning in the Australian curriculum? How can curriculum design and teaching programs for indigenous language speaking students be better informed by the children’s prior mathematical understanding?

Recent Publications

  1. Bringing ethnomathematics to elementary schools in Papua New Guinea: A design-based research project

    Bibliography

    Kay Owens, Cris Edmonds-Wathen, and Vagi Bino. 2015. "Bringing ethnomathematics to elementary schools in Papua New Guinea: A design-based research project." Revista Latino Americana de Etnomatemática. 8 (2): 32-52.

  2. Indigenous language speaking students learning mathematics in English: Expectations of and for teachers

    Bibliography

    Cris Edmonds-Wathen. 2015. "Indigenous language speaking students learning mathematics in English: Expectations of and for teachers." Australian Journal of Indigenous Education. 1-11. doi: doi: 10.1017/jie.2015.9.

  3. Distribution, recognition and representation: Mathematics education and Indigenous students

    Bibliography

    Edmonds-Wathen, Cris, Meaney, Tamsin, McMurchy-Pilkington, Cris, and Trinick, Tony. 2016. "Distribution, recognition and representation: Mathematics education and Indigenous students". In Research in mathematics education in Australasia 2012-2015, 145-167. Singapore: Springer.

  4. Impact of differing grammatical structures in mathematics teaching and learning

    Bibliography

    Edmonds-Wathen, Cris, Trinick, T, and Durand-Guerrier, V. 2016. "Impact of differing grammatical structures in mathematics teaching and learning". In Mathematics education and linguistic diversity: The 21st ICMI study, 23-46. New York: Springer.

  5. Route description in Iwaidja: Grammar and conceptualisation of motion

    Bibliography

    Cris Edmonds-Wathen. 2016. "Route description in Iwaidja: Grammar and conceptualisation of motion." PNA (Special issue in mathematics education and language). 11 (1): 53-74.

Elizabeth Ellis ARC Discovery Indigenous Fellow

Elizabeth Ellis

  • Title: ARC Discovery Indigenous Fellow
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The Australian National University

Elizabeth Marrkilyi Ellis is a Ngaatjatjarra educator, interpreter and linguist from the Ngaanyatjarra region of Western Australia. Over recent years she has collaborated with Inge Kral on a research project documenting Western Desert speech styles and changing modes of communication across the generations.

Recent Publications

  1. Pictures from My Memory: My Story as a Ngaatjatjarra Woman

    Bibliography

    Elizabeth Ellis. 2016. Pictures from My Memory: My Story as a Ngaatjatjarra Woman. Canberra : Aboriginal Studies Press.

Simon Gonzalez Ochoa Doctor

Simon Gonzalez Ochoa

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Evolution
  • Institution: The Australian National Unviersity

Simon’s research focuses on acoustic phonetics, empowered by computational tools. His experience is mainly on Australian English, after finishing his PhD in English Phonology (Australian English) at the University of Newcastle, and working as a Research Assistant at Griffith University analysing West Australian English (ARC-funded, led by Gerard Docherty). He develops computational tools (scripts and apps) for more efficient and practical analysis/visualisation of phonetic and phonological phenomena. Currently he is part of two projects at ANU: Sydney Speaks (CI Catherine Travis) and the Transcription Acceleration Project (CIs Nick Evans and Janet Wiles), both ARC-funded through CoEDL.

James Grama Doctor

James Grama

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Evolution
  • Institution: The Australian National University

James completed his PhD at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa where he focused largely on vocalic variation in English and English-based varieties. His work on California English, Hawaiʻi English, and Hawaiʻi Creole has investigated the ways in which phonetic variation is correlated with social factors and sound change over time. In his research, he uses quantitative acoustic measures along with rigorous statistical models to describe how changes in linguistic varieties have taken shape, especially in heterogeneous communities. At the Centre, he works as a member of the Sydney Speaks project where he hopes to investigate the acoustic features of a variety of features of Australian English in the diverse and changing Sydney community, especially as a function of socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and network affiliation.

Scott Heath Doctor

Scott Heath

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Technology (and Evolution)
  • Institution: The University of Queensland

Scott is interested in how robots can develop languages where words are understood by robots through their interactions with each other and their environment. Scott completed his PhD on the Lingodroids project in 2015, a project that explores how robots can develop words to describe the places and times that they share. He is now working on Opie, a robot that is designed for exploring social interactions with children.

Recent Publications

  1. Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction

    Bibliography

    Scott Heath, Gautier Durantin, Marie Boden, Kristyn Hensby, Jonathan Taufatofua, Ola Olsson, Paul Pounds, Jason Weigel, and Janet Wiles. 2017. "Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction." Frontiers in Robotics and AI. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/frobt.2017.00027.

  2. Social Moments: A Perspective on Interaction for Social Robotics

    Bibliography

    Gautier Durantin, Scott Heath, and Janet Wiles. 2017. "Social Moments: A Perspective on Interaction for Social Robotics." Frontiers in Robotics and AI. (4): 24. doi: doi: 10.3389/frobt.2017.00024.

  3. Lingodroids: Cross-Situational Learning for Episodic Elements

    Bibliography

    Scott Heath, David Ball, and Janet Wiles. 2016. "Lingodroids: Cross-Situational Learning for Episodic Elements." IEEE Transactions on Cognitive and Developmental Systems. 8 (1): 3-14. doi: 10.1109/TAMD.2015.2442619.

  4. Discovering patterns of touch: a case study for visualization-driven analysis in human-robot interaction

    Bibliography

    Kris Rogers, Janet Wiles, Scott Heath, Kristyn Hensby, and Jonathan Taufatofua. 2016. "Discovering patterns of touch: a case study for visualization-driven analysis in human-robot interaction". 499-500. Christchurch, NZ.

  5. Social cardboard: Pretotyping a social ethnodroid in the wild.

    Bibliography

    Janet Wiles, Peter Worthy, Kristyn Hensby, Marie Boden, Scott Heath, Paul Pounds, Nikodem Rybak, Michael Smith, Jonathan Taufatofua, and Jason Weigel. 2016. "Social cardboard: Pretotyping a social ethnodroid in the wild.". In Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), 531-532. Christchurch, NZ.

Anton Killin Doctor

Anton Killin

ANU CoEDL Postdoc Anton Killin will be on secondment from the Centre from mid-August 2017 to mid-May 2018 to take up a position as a Visiting Postdoctoral Associate with the Florida International University in Miami. While at FIU Anton will be contributing to a research program on philosophy, archaeology and palaeoanthropology, including furthering his CoEDL research on music and language origins.

Anton completed his PhD in Philosophy at Victoria University of Wellington on music and philosophical naturalism, combining research topics in philosophy of music and evolution of music. His postdoctoral research at CoeDL focuses on the intersection of music and language, in particular the connections between evolution of music and evolution of language. In addition to these topics, Anton’s research interests include philosophy of biology and philosophy of the arts more broadly.

Recent Publications

  1. Fictionalism about musical works

    Bibliography

    Anton Killin. 2017. "Fictionalism about musical works." Canadian Journal of Philosophy. 1-26. doi: 10.1080/00455091.2017.1357993.

  2. Plio-Pleistocene foundations of hominin musicality: coevolution of cognition, sociality, and music

    Bibliography

    Anton Killin. 2017. "Plio-Pleistocene foundations of hominin musicality: coevolution of cognition, sociality, and music." Biological Theory. 1-14. doi: 10.1007/s13752-017-0274-6.

  3. Analyizing antiqueness: a response to Curtis and Baines

    Bibliography

    Anton Killin. 2017. "Analyizing antiqueness: a response to Curtis and Baines." Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism. 75 (2): 195-197. doi: 10.1111/jaac.12362.

  4. Hominin musicality and musical expressivity: revisiting Davies' contour theory

    Bibliography

    Anton Killin. 2017. "Hominin musicality and musical expressivity: revisiting Davies' contour theory." Debates in Aesthetics. 13 (1): 11-18.

  5. Musicality and the evolution of mind, mimesis, and entrainment

    Bibliography

    Anton Killin. February 25, 2016. "Musicality and the evolution of mind, mimesis, and entrainment." Biology & Philosophy. 31 (3): 421-434. doi: 10.1007/s10539-016-9519-1.

Jacki Liddle Doctor

Jacki Liddle

Jacki Liddle is a postdoctoral research fellow and occupational therapist researching quality of life, participation and life transitions. She uses innovative technology, along with qualitative and quantitative research methods to investigate the needs and experiences of people living with neurological conditions (Parkinson's disease, dementia, stroke), older people and their caregivers, and develop approaches to improve outcomes.

Her research has focussed on the experiences of life transitions related to ageing (for example, driving cessation of older people), illness, and related treatments (for example, deep brain stimulation). Developing technology to measure outcomes including quality of life, wellbeing, time use, and activity and role participation has led to new approaches of monitoring community life and impact of treatments. Researching the experiences related to retirement from driving for older people during her PhD led to the development of the UQDRIVE program, now called CarFreeMe for older drivers, people with dementia and people with traumatic brain injury. A telehealth trial of the the CarFreeMe program is currently underway.​

Jacki is currently working on the Florence Project with a focus on the lived experience of people living with dementia and their conversation partners, and how to facilitate a co-development approach to communication technology with people living with dementia.

Recent Publications

  1. Working together to keep communicating

    Bibliography

    Jacki Liddle. 2017. "Working together to keep communicating." Australian Journal of Dementia Care. 6 (4): 10-11.

  2. Hello Harlie: Enabling Speech Monitoring Through Chat-Bot Conversations

    Bibliography

    David Ireland, Christina Atay, Jacki Liddle, Dana Bradford, Helen Lee, Olivia Rushin, Thomas Mullins, Daniel Angus, Janet Wiles, Simon McBride, and Adam Vogel. 2016. "Hello Harlie: Enabling Speech Monitoring Through Chat-Bot Conversations." Studies in Health Technology and Informatics.. 227: 55. doi: 10.3233/978-1-61499-666-8-55.

  3. Can a smartphone-based chatbot engage older community group members? The impact of specialised content

    Bibliography

    Christina Atay, David Ireland, Jacki Liddle, Janet Wiles, Adam Vogel, Daniel Angus, Dana Bradford, Alana Campbell, Olivia Rushin, and Helen Chenery. July 1, 2016. "Can a smartphone-based chatbot engage older community group members? The impact of specialised content." Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. 12 (7): 1005-1006.

Deborah Loakes Doctor

Deborah Loakes

Deborah (Debbie) is a phonetician at The University of Melbourne. She has been working on both Indigenous languages and Australian English, and has most recently carried out collaborative work on prosody in Mawng, and has also carried out postdoctoral research focusing on a sound change (a vowel merger) in Australian English. Debbie's postdoctoral project for the Centre of Excellence is a sociophonetic study of Aboriginal English, bringing together an analysis of speech production, speech perception, and social factors. Participants will be (English L1) Indigenous people from Warrnambool, where the vowel merger occurs in the Anglo-Celtic community. Debbie is particularly interested in whether this merger is present in production and perception for the minority Indigenous community. Ultimately the project will use fine-grained phonetic analyses to feed into a deeper understanding of language shape, processing and evolution (and their interaction).

Recent Publications

  1. Can you t[æ]ll I’m from M[æ]lbourne? An overview of the DRESS and TRAP vowels before /l/ as a regional accent marker in Australian English

    Bibliography

    Deborah Loakes, John Hajek, and Janet Fletcher. 2017. "Can you t[æ]ll I’m from M[æ]lbourne? An overview of the DRESS and TRAP vowels before /l/ as a regional accent marker in Australian English." English Worldwide. 38 (1): 29-49. doi: 10.1075/eww.38.1.03loa.

  2. Short vowels in L1 Aboriginal English spoken in Western Australia

    Bibliography

    Deborah Loakes, Janet Fletcher, John Hajek, Joshua Clothier, and B Volchok. 2016. "Short vowels in L1 Aboriginal English spoken in Western Australia". In 16th Speech Science and Technology Conference (SST2016), 33-36. Sydney.

  3. Intonational correlates of subject and object realisation in Mawng (Australian)

    Bibliography

    Janet Fletcher, Hywel Stoakes, Ruth Singer, and Deborah Loakes. 2016. "Intonational correlates of subject and object realisation in Mawng (Australian)". In Proceedings of Speech Prosody 2016, 188-192. Boston, USA.

  4. Accentual prominence and consonant lengthening and strengthening in Mawng

    Bibliography

    Deborah Loakes, Hywel Stoakes, Ruth Singer, and Janet Fletcher. 2015. Accentual prominence and consonant lengthening and strengthening in Mawng. : University of Glasgow.

  5. An Investigation of the /el/–/æl/ Merger in Australian English: A Pilot Study on Production and Perception in South-West Victoria

    Bibliography

    Deborah Loakes, Joshua Clothier, John Hajek, and Janet Fletcher. October 2, 2014. "An Investigation of the /el/–/æl/ Merger in Australian English: A Pilot Study on Production and Perception in South-West Victoria." Australian Journal of Linguistics. 34 (4): 436-452. doi: 10.1080/07268602.2014.929078.

John Mansfield Doctor

John Mansfield

John Mansfield is researching changes that have unfolded in the Australian Aboriginal language Murrinhpatha in the 80 years since permanent European contact was established. John recently completed a PhD on Murrinhpatha youth language and subculture under the supervision of Jane Simpson, and prior to this worked on dictionaries for Oxford University Press. John is excited to be involved in the first study of Aboriginal language change in "real time" (as opposed to historical reconstruction). He is especially looking forward to opportunities for skills and training exchange with Murrinpatha speakers in Wadeye.

Recent Publications

  1. Prosodic words in cyclic derivation: the strange case of Murrinhpatha compound verbs

    Bibliography

    John Mansfield. 2017. "Prosodic words in cyclic derivation: the strange case of Murrinhpatha compound verbs." Morphology. doi: 10.1007/s11525-017-9303-1.

  2. Documenting sociolinguistic variation in lesser-studied indigenous communities: Challenges and practical solutions

    Bibliography

    John Mansfield, and James Stanton. 2017. "Documenting sociolinguistic variation in lesser-studied indigenous communities: Challenges and practical solutions." Language Documentation & Conservation Special Publication. 13: 116-136.

  3. Intersecting Formatives and Inflectional Predictability: How Do Speakers and Learners Predict the Correct Form of Murrinhpatha Verbs?”

    Bibliography

    John Mansfield. 2016. "Intersecting Formatives and Inflectional Predictability: How Do Speakers and Learners Predict the Correct Form of Murrinhpatha Verbs?”." Word Structure. 9 (2): 183-214.

  4. Polysynthetic sociolinguistics: the language and culture of Murrinh Patha Youth

    Bibliography

    John Mansfield. 2014-06. "Polysynthetic sociolinguistics: the language and culture of Murrinh Patha Youth."

  5. Consonant lenition as a sociophonetic variable in Murrinh Patha (Australia)

    Bibliography

    John Mansfield. July 2015. "Consonant lenition as a sociophonetic variable in Murrinh Patha (Australia)." Language Variation and Change. 27 (02): 203–225. doi: 10.1017/S0954394515000046.

Karen Mulak Doctor

Karen Mulak

Karen is a postdoctoral research fellow at Western Sydney University, working with A/Prof Paola Escudero within the CoEDL to investigate language learning in monolingual and multilingual populations. Her program examines two main questions that are directly relevant to successful communication in multilingual communities: how exposure to two or more languages or accents affects word learning and the perception of sounds, and how monolinguals perceive sounds and recognize words in accents and languages other than their own. Through EEG, eye-tracking, ipad-based behavioral tasks and other laboratory-based behavioral tasks, this program examines infants, children, and adults from differing language backgrounds to determine their ability to discriminate speech sounds, recognise familiar words, and learn novel words, and discover whether effects are language-specific, and whether any effects are dependent on the amount of exposure to linguistic variation. This program involves collaborators at research institutions in Australia and around the world, including CI Evan Kidd and Research Affiliate Haley Vlach. Prior to joining the CoE, Karen completed her PhD in Psycholinguistics at the MARCS Institute within Western Sydney University under the supervision of Prof Cathi Best. She was employed as a research associate at the MARCS Institute, working with A/Prof Escudero, Prof Best, and others. She has also taught extensively at Western Sydney University in the Schools of Psychology and Linguistics. Her research interests include first- and second-language learning, and cross-linguistic and cross-accent perception.

Recent Publications

  1. Indexical and linguistic processing by 12-month-olds: Discrimination of speaker, accent and vowel differences

    Bibliography

    Karen Mulak, Cory Bonn, Katerina Chladkova, Richard Aslin, and Paola Escudero. 2017. "Indexical and linguistic processing by 12-month-olds: Discrimination of speaker, accent and vowel differences." PLOS One. 12 (5): e0176762. doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0176762.

  2. The role of positive affect in the acquisition of word-object associations

    Bibliography

    Nicole Traynor, Karen Mulak, R Robbins, G Weidemann, and Paola Escudero. 2016. "The role of positive affect in the acquisition of word-object associations". In Proceedings of the Sixteenth Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 9-12. Parramatta.

  3. Acoustic Properties Predict Perception of Unfamiliar Dutch Vowels by Adult Australian English and Peruvian Spanish Listeners

    Bibliography

    Samra Alispahic, Karen Mulak, and Paola Escudero. 2017. "Acoustic Properties Predict Perception of Unfamiliar Dutch Vowels by Adult Australian English and Peruvian Spanish Listeners." Frontiers in Psychology. 8: doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00052.

  4. Cross-situational learning of minimal word pairs

    Bibliography

    Paola Escudero, Karen Mulak, and Haley Vlach. 2016. "Cross-situational learning of minimal word pairs." Cognitive Science. 40: 455-465. doi: 10.1111/cogs.12243.

  5. Infants encode phonetic detail during cross-situational word learning

    Bibliography

    Paola Escudero, Karen Mulak, and Haley Vlach. 2016. "Infants encode phonetic detail during cross-situational word learning." Language Sciences.

Ola Olsson Doctor

Ola Olsson

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Technology (and Evolution)
  • Institution: The University of Queensland

Ola received his PhD in real-time computer graphics from Chalmers University of Technology in 2014. His research focussed on massively parallel algorithms running on Graphics Programming Units (GPUs), primarily solving real-time graphics problems involving many lights. He has a broad interest in High-Performance Computing (HPC) and GPU-algorithm design and development, and has assisted HPC-application development, for example fusion-plasma simulation targeting the Titan, the world #3 supercomputer. Ola is involved in computational aspects of Opie, a social robot in development at UQ, as well as assisting anywhere in the Centre where high computational throughput is required.

Recent Publications

  1. Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction

    Bibliography

    Scott Heath, Gautier Durantin, Marie Boden, Kristyn Hensby, Jonathan Taufatofua, Ola Olsson, Paul Pounds, Jason Weigel, and Janet Wiles. 2017. "Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction." Frontiers in Robotics and AI. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/frobt.2017.00027.

Ronald J. Planer Doctor

Ronald J. Planer

Ronald J. Planer received his PhD in Philosophy, along with a Certificate in Cognitive Science, from Rutgers University, New Brunswick (USA). His doctoral research examined the theoretical role of informational concepts in molecular, developmental, and evolutionary biology. He is currently focused on a cluster of issues related to the evolution of language, among them: foundational models of communication, the pathways by which different types of communication systems emerge and how they interact with one another, the relevance of gesture and musical vocalization to the evolution of linguistic communication, and more. Ronald strongly prefers an interdisciplinary approach to the issues he works on, drawing upon ideas from archeology, anthropology, linguistics, psychology, neuroscience, and biology, in addition to philosophy.

Sonja Riesberg Doctor

Sonja Riesberg

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The Australian National University

Commencing January 2017

Hannah Sarvasy Doctor

Hannah Sarvasy

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Learning
  • Institution: The Australian National University

Hannah Sarvasy joins the Centre from the University of California Los Angeles. She completed her PhD at James Cook University, then taught graduate and undergraduate courses at UCLA as a member of the Linguistics Department Faculty there from 2014 through 2015. She is engaged in a longitudinal study of acquisition of the Papuan language Nungon by children in the Uruwa River valley, Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. The study aims to produce a comprehensive description of the acquisition of Nungon, with special attention to particularly-Papuan characteristics such as switch-reference, clause-chaining, multiple tense and aspect distinctions, and multiple pronoun forms, as well as reported speech constructions. The study will also analyse children’s acquisition of intersubjectivity by tracking communicative functions as well as linguistic forms.

Recent Publications

  1. Quantification in Nungon

    Bibliography

    Hannah Sarvasy. 2017. "Quantification in Nungon." Springer Studies in Linguistics and Philosophy. 97: 609-663.

  2. Review of Le tetserret, langue berbère du Niger

    Bibliography

    Hannah Sarvasy. 2017. "Review of Le tetserret, langue berbère du Niger." Journal of African Languages. 38 (1): 560. doi: 10.1515/jall-2017-0005.

  3. Warblish: Verbal Mimicry of Birdsong

    Bibliography

    Hannah Sarvasy. 2016. "Warblish: Verbal Mimicry of Birdsong." Journal of Ethnobiology. 36 (4): 765-782. doi: 10.2993/0278-0771-36.4.765.

  4. Imperatives and Commands in Nungon

    Bibliography

    Sarvasy, Hannah. 2017. "Imperatives and Commands in Nungon". In Commands, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  5. Quantification in Nungon

    Bibliography

    Sarvasy, Hannah. 2017. "Quantification in Nungon". In Handbook of Quantifiers in Natural Language, 609-663. Amsterdam: Springer.

Stefan Schnell Doctor

Stefan Schnell

Stefan Schnell joins the Centre from La Trobe University where he has carried out quantitative cross-corpus research into the interface between argument structure and discourse structure, focussing on the hypothesis of Preferred Argument Structure, within his ARC DECRA project “Typology of Language Use”. Stefan has a background in language documentation and corpus building of lesser-described languages, and since early 2007 he was engaged in the documentation of the Vera’a language from North Vanuatu. His 2011 PhD thesis (Kiel University, Germany) contains the first modern account of the language based on an extensive multi-media data collection resulting from 13 months of fieldwork in the language community.

In his postdoctoral project for the Centre of Excellence Stefan will expand his text-based typological research. The focus of the project will be on the interplay of different factors driving the choice of referring expressions in different text varieties across diverse languages, in particular in the South Pacific region. To these ends, Stefan will continue his collaboration with documentary linguist colleagues and other researchers in the development of corpus annotation procedures that enable quantitative corpus-based research into argument realisation and referential choice across typologically diverse languages. Beyond this specific research agenda, he will further develop standards in corpus building from lesser-described languages in an academic and a language community context, aiming at greater mobilisation of data from collaborative language documentation projects for grammar writing, as well as typological and variationist linguistic research.

Recent Publications

  1. Do grammatical relations reflect information status? Reassessing Preferred Argument Structure theory against discourse data from Tondano

    Bibliography

    Timothy Brickell, and Stefan Schnell. 2017. "Do grammatical relations reflect information status? Reassessing Preferred Argument Structure theory against discourse data from Tondano." Linguistic Typology. 21 (1): 177-208.

  2. The discourse basis of ergativity revisited

    Bibliography

    Geoffrey Haig, and Stefan Schnell. 2016. "The discourse basis of ergativity revisited." Language. 92 (3): 591-618. doi: 10.1353/lan.2016.0049.

  3. The exceptional linguistic density of Vanuatu

    Bibliography

    Alexandre François, Michael Franjieh, Sebastien Lacrampe, and Stefan Schnell. 2015-08-11. The exceptional linguistic density of Vanuatu. : Asia-Pacific Linguistics Open Access.

  4. Walking to Erro: Stories of travel, origins, or affection

    Bibliography

    Thieberger, Nick, François, Alexandre, Lacrampe, Sebastien, Schnell, Stefan, and Franjieh, Michael. 2015. "Walking to Erro: Stories of travel, origins, or affection". In The Languages of Vanuatu: Unity and Diversity., 247-263. Canberra: Asia-Pacific Linguistics.

Matthew Spike Doctor

Matthew Spike

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Evolution
  • Institution: The Australian National University

Matt comes to us from the University of Edinburgh, where he was a member of the Language Evolution and Computation unit. His work focuses on looking at how cultural processes contribute to the evolution of learned communication and the emergence of structure in language. This involves looking at models from across several disciplines, including evolutionary linguistics, cognitive science, artificial life, evolutionary game theory, economics, and information theory. Matt works mainly with computational models, but is also very interested in empirical studies.

Recent Publications

  1. Minimal Requirements for the Emergence of Learned Signaling

    Bibliography

    Matthew Spike, Kevin Stadler, Simon Kirby, and Kenny Smith. 2016. "Minimal Requirements for the Emergence of Learned Signaling." Cognitive Science. doi: 10.1111/cogs.12351.

Anna Stephen Doctor

Anna Stephen

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Anna Stephen has lived and worked in the Northern Territory for 8 years. She has recently completed a PhD exploring the environmental and social determinants of otitis media (OM) in Aboriginal children living remotely. Her work with Jill Wigglesworth for COEDL will focus on creating educational resources and programs to improve phonological awareness and literacy in Aboriginal children with OM and associated hearing loss. She is very excited about collaborating with researchers from COEDL and believes that interdisciplinary collaborations are essential to improving the care and services for Aboriginal children with OM.

Currently, Anna holds two post-doctoral positions with the Centre of Research Excellence for the Dynamics in Language and the Centre of Research Excellence in Ear and Hearing Health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children. She has skills in both quantitative and qualitative research, conducting clinical trials and writing systematic reviews to Cochrane standards.

Alba Tuninetti

Alba Tuninetti

  • Program: Processing
  • Institution: Western Sydney University

Alba is a postdoctoral research fellow working under A/Prof Paola Escudero on second language (L2) speech perception using behavioural and EEG methodologies. She received her bachelors' from the University of Pennsylvania in 2009, and went on to complete her Master's in 2012 at the University of Pittsburgh examining how nonnative English speakers processed syntactic violations using eye-tracking. She completed her PhD in 2015, investigating how similarity to the first language, training, feedback, and cue strength influence the neural and behavioral processing of nonnative phonemes. She received an Endeavour Research Fellowship from the Australian Department of Education to examine how the acoustics of the first language influence the perception of nonnative phonemes. She is also interested in bilingual speech and accent perception, investigating how the first language influences the L2 at the acoustic and phonological levels.

Recent Publications

  1. When speaker identity is unavoidable: Neural processing of speaker identity cues in natural speech

    Bibliography

    Alba Tuninetti, K Chladkova, V Peter, N Schiller, and Paola Escudero. 2017. "When speaker identity is unavoidable: Neural processing of speaker identity cues in natural speech." Brain and Language. (174): 42-49. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2017.07.001.

Paul Vrbik

Paul Vrbik

  • Program: Technology
  • Institution: University of Queensland

Paul recieved a B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Pure Mathematics from (resp) the McMaster University and Simon Fraser University. In 2016 he was awarded a Ph.D. from the University of Western Ontario in Computer Science for his work in Computational Algebraic Geometry. For two years Paul will set aside his abstract work to focus on "real-world" problems. He hopes that his expertise in reasoning and programming will benefit the CoEDL group.

Yvonne Yu

Yvonne Yu

  • Institution: University of Queensland

Dr Yvonne Yu received PhD degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Queensland, and BE in Automation from the University of Science and Technology of China, in 2014 and 2009, respectively. Dr Yu joined Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language in 2016. Her current research interest is in the broad area of Natural Language Processing, particularly in visualisation hermeneutics and data analysis for human to human and/or human to machine communication.

Research Associates

Rosey Billington Doctor

Rosey Billington

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Rosey is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Melbourne. She is currently researching the phonetic and phonological patterns of South Efate, an Oceanic language of Vanuatu, together with CIs Fletcher and Nick Thieberger. As part of the Processing and Shape programs, this project focuses on the correlates of prosodic phenomena such as stress, and the ways that prosodic patterns interact with phonotactic and morphosyntactic structures. For her PhD research, Rosey worked on a phonetically-based description of the phonology of Lopit, an Eastern Nilotic language traditionally spoken in South Sudan. This project included phonetic investigations of vowel contrasts, glides and gemination, and tonal distinctions. Rosey also maintains an interest in the phonetic characteristics of English varieties spoken in Australia.

Recent Publications

  1. Advanced Tongue Root’ in Lopit: Acoustic and ultrasound evidence

    Bibliography

    Rosey Billington. 2014. "Advanced Tongue Root’ in Lopit: Acoustic and ultrasound evidence". In Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, 119-122. Christchurch.

  2. Temporal correlates of Lopit singleton and geminate glide

    Bibliography

    Rosey Billington. 2016. "Temporal correlates of Lopit singleton and geminate glide". In Proceedings of the 16th Australasian International Speech Science and Technology Conference, 265-268. Parramatta.

  3. Lexical tone in Lopit

    Bibliography

    Rosey Billington. 2015. "Lexical tone in Lopit". In Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Glasgow, Scotland.

Darja Hoenigman Doctor

Darja Hoenigman

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The Australian National University
Peter Hurst Doctor

Peter Hurst

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Peter completed his PhD at the University of Melbourne with Assoc Prof Rachel Nordlinger. His work examined the reciprocal constructions in Icelandic (Germanic), Malagasy (Austronesian) and Swahili (Bantu) in order to determine the variability of their non-standard syntax and to analyse these constructions within the theoretical framework of Lexical Functional Grammar (LFG). He revealed that the syntactic and, to a lesser extent, semantic behaviour of reciprocal constructions arise not from structural features (such as whether the reciprocal construction is formed from a clitic, affix etc.), but from more fundamental reciprocation strategies by which asymmetric predicates are made to describe symmetric situations. He is now working with Ian Green and Rachel Nordlinger on the Daly Languages website (http://www.ianxgreen.com/tryonagain) - a database driven website that presents the languages of this region and their related literature in an accessible manner.

Inge Kral Doctor

Inge Kral

Inge is a linguistic anthropologist working with Jennifer Green and Jane Simpson on Elizabeth Ellis’ ARC Discovery Indigenous Award investigating Western Desert speech styles and verbal arts in the Ngaanyatjarra Lands region of Western Australia. Co-affiliated with the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR-ANU) Inge draws on some thirty years experience in Indigenous education, language and literacy in remote Australia. As an ethnographer of language and literacy her research interests include literacy as social practice; adolescent language socialisation; out-of-school learning; and youth, digital media and new literacies. She recently completed an ARC DECRA researching changing modes of communication and the socio-cultural and linguistic consequences of digital technologies in remote Indigenous Australia. Current projects include ‘Getting in Touch: Language and digital inclusion in Australian Indigenous communities’ and a youth media and literacy project in an Orang Asli indigenous village in Peninsular Malaysia.

Recent Publications

  1. Remote Indigenous Communities

    Bibliography

    Kral, Inge. 2017. "Remote Indigenous Communities". In The Sage Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning, 655-658. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

  2. ‘Yipirinya School: that generation, this generation’

    Bibliography

    Kral, Inge. 2017. "‘Yipirinya School: that generation, this generation’". In History of Bilingual Education in the Northern Territory, 269-284. Springer.

  3. From the Local to the Global: Socialisation into Adult Literacy Practice in the Remote Indigenous Australian Context

    Bibliography

    Kral, Inge, Yasukawa, Keiko, and Black, Stephen. 2016. "From the Local to the Global: Socialisation into Adult Literacy Practice in the Remote Indigenous Australian Context". In Beyond Economic Interests: Critical Perspectives on Adult Literacy and Numeracy in a Globalised World, 61-76. Sense Publishers.

  4. Getting in Touch: Language and digital inclusion in Australian Indigenous communities

    Bibliography

    Margaret Carew, Jennifer Green, Inge Kral, Rachel Nordlinger, and Ruth Singer. 2015. "Getting in Touch: Language and digital inclusion in Australian Indigenous communities." Language Documentation and Conservation. 9: 307-323. doi: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4940.5924.

Doug Marmion Doctor

Doug Marmion

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Shape
  • Institution: AIATSIS

Originally from Perth, Doug worked as a teacher at Yirara College (a residential school for secondary age Aboriginal children from remote communities) in Alice Springs, followed by three years as Adult Educator for the community of Walungurru (also known as Kintyre) 400 kms west of Alice Springs. While in Central Australia he began learning the Western Desert Language and studying linguistics, which eventually led to him taking up the position of Senior Linguist at the Yamaji Language Centre in Geraldton, Western Australia. In this position he worked with speakers of various languages of the Murchison-Gascoyne region (including Wajarri, Badimaya, Nhanda, Malgana, Warriyangka, Ngarlawangka and Wanmala) to document those languages from the remaining speakers and develop strategies for their maintenance and revival.

Following this Doug completed a PhD in linguistics at the Australian National University with a description of Wutung, a complex, tonal Papuan language and member of the Skou language family, spoken on the north-west coast of Papua New Guinea.

Doug joined AIATSIS in 2010 as the Linguistics Research Fellow. Doug’s primary research interests are across the areas of Indigenous language description, documentation and revitalisation in Australia. He is presently working with the Ngunawal community of Canberra on the revival of their language and has continuing interests in the documentation of the Western Australian languages Ngajumaya, and Wajarri, and the historical linguistics of the Kartu subgroup of languages.

Doug was co-author of both the first (2005) and second (2014) National Indigenous Language Surveys and is one of the lead authors of the Curriculum Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages.

Doug’s work for the Centre of Excellence is focused on the AIATSIS archives and drawing on language materials held there to construct corpora of Australian languages.

Hywel Stoakes Doctor

Hywel Stoakes

  • Title: Doctor
  • Program: Processing
  • Institution: The University of Melbourne

Hywel is currently researching phonetic consonant contrasts and coarticulatory patterns across varieties of Bininj Kunwok and Yolngu Matha. Within the Centre he is working as part of the Processing program exploring the production and perception of prosody in Australian languages. He recently finished a PhD within the School of Languages and Linguistics at The University of Melbourne that combined aerodynamic and acoustic analyses in an study of consonant production in Kunwinjku (Bininj Kunwok).

Previously he was part of a team investigating the interaction of endemic chronic suppurative otitis media with speech production and perception in remote Australian Indigenous communities. In the future, Hywel hopes to continue working in this area and is keen to foster cross-disciplinary collaboration.

Hywel is also currently adapting existing software tools for the automatic labelling of endangered and under-documented languages. He is looking into the feasibility of scaling this to support future cross-linguistic phonetic research into Australian languages.

Recent Publications

  1. Nasal aerodynamics and coarticulation in Bininj Kunwok: Smoothing Spline Analysis of Variance

    Bibliography

    Hywel Stoakes, Janet Fletcher, and Andrew Butcher. 2016. "Nasal aerodynamics and coarticulation in Bininj Kunwok: Smoothing Spline Analysis of Variance". In 16th Speech Science and Technology Conference, 113-116. Sydney.

  2. Pointing out directions in Murrinhpatha

    Bibliography

    Joe Blythe, Kinngirri Mardigan Mardigan, Mawurt Ernest Perdjert, and Hywel Stoakes. 2016. "Pointing out directions in Murrinhpatha." Open Linguistics. 2: 132-159. doi: 10.1515/opli-2016-0007.

  3. Intonational correlates of subject and object realisation in Mawng (Australian)

    Bibliography

    Janet Fletcher, Hywel Stoakes, Ruth Singer, and Deborah Loakes. 2016. "Intonational correlates of subject and object realisation in Mawng (Australian)". In Proceedings of Speech Prosody 2016, 188-192. Boston, USA.

  4. Vowel duration and consonant lengthening in Djambarrpuyŋu

    Bibliography

    Kathleen Jepson, and Hywel Stoakes. 2015. "Vowel duration and consonant lengthening in Djambarrpuyŋu". In Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences,

  5. Accentual prominence and consonant lengthening and strengthening in Mawng

    Bibliography

    Deborah Loakes, Hywel Stoakes, Ruth Singer, and Janet Fletcher. 2015. Accentual prominence and consonant lengthening and strengthening in Mawng. : University of Glasgow.

David Wilkins Doctor

David Wilkins

David Wilkins is an anthropological linguist who explores the relationship between language use, culture and cognition. His publications range across lexical semantics, pragmatics, semantic change, gesture, aphasia and augmentative and alternative communication. He has done fieldwork in central Australia and Far North Queensland. In the area of documentary and descriptive linguistics, he is currently working to show how and why the current model of grammar, dictionary and texts needs to be complemented by a grammar of language use, an ethno-thesaurus, an ethnography of speaking and an account of a community's paralinguistic repertoire and the interface of language with other culturally available semiotic systems.

Recent Publications

  1. Arandic alternate sign language(s)

    Bibliography

    Green, Jennifer, Wilkins, David, Jepson, Julie Bakken, de Clerck, Goedele, Lutalo-Kiingi, Sam, and McGregor, William B. 2015. "Arandic alternate sign language(s)". In Sign languages of the world: A comparative handbook, 843-870.

  2. With or Without Speech: Arandic Sign Language from Central Australia

    Bibliography

    Jennifer Green, and David Wilkins. April 3, 2014. "With or Without Speech: Arandic Sign Language from Central Australia." Australian Journal of Linguistics. 34 (2): 234-261. doi: 10.1080/07268602.2014.887407.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University

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