Chief Investigators

Helen Chenery Professor

Helen Chenery

Helen Chenery is a clinical researcher in the area of acquired neurological language disorders. She has researched in the areas of speech pathology; the neurobiology of language; the impact of deep brain stimulation on language and cognition, technology-enabled health innovation; and health workforce reform. She has led policy and practice reform in dementia care, health workforce and service design, and inter-professional education/practice. A leading language and rehabilitation researcher, Professor Chenery has pioneered significant advances in understanding and treating acquired language disorders resulting from neurological disease, particularly in the neurobiology of subcortical language impairment, the impact of neurodegenerative diseases on language and cognition and digital health innovation.

Recent Publications

  1. IN PRESS: Balancing Self-tracking and Surveillance: Legal, Ethical and Technological Issues in Using Smartphones to Monitor Communication in People with Health Conditions

    Bibliography

    Jackie Liddle, Mark Burdon, David Ireland, Adrian Carter, Christina Atay, Nastassja Milevskiy, Simon McBride, Helen Chenery, and Wayne Hall. 2016. "IN PRESS: Balancing Self-tracking and Surveillance: Legal, Ethical and Technological Issues in Using Smartphones to Monitor Communication in People with Health Conditions." Journal of Law and Medicine. 24 (2): 387-397.

  2. Using technology to enhance communication between people with dementia and their carers

    Bibliography

    Helen Chenery, Christina Atay, Alana Campbell, Erin Conway, Daniel Angus, and Janet Wiles. July 1, 2016. "Using technology to enhance communication between people with dementia and their carers." Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. 12 (7): 279-280. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2016.06.507.

  3. Can a smartphone-based chatbot engage older community group members? The impact of specialised content

    Bibliography

    Christina Atay, David Ireland, Jacki Liddle, Janet Wiles, Adam Vogel, Daniel Angus, Dana Bradford, Alana Campbell, Olivia Rushin, and Helen Chenery. July 1, 2016. "Can a smartphone-based chatbot engage older community group members? The impact of specialised content." Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. 12 (7): 1005-1006.

  4. Evaluating the MESSAGE communication strategies in dementia training for use with community-based aged care staff working with people with dementia: A controlled pretest-post-test study

    Bibliography

    Erin Conway, and Helen Chenery. January 2016. "Evaluating the MESSAGE communication strategies in dementia training for use with community-based aged care staff working with people with dementia: A controlled pretest-post-test study." Journal of Clinical Nursing. 25: doi: DOI: 10.1111/jocn.13134.

  5. Visualising conversations between care home staff and residents with dementia

    Bibliography

    Rosemary Baker, Daniel Angus, Erin Smith-Conway, Katherine Baker, Cindy Gallois, Andrew Smith, Janet Wiles, and Helen Chenery. 2015. "Visualising conversations between care home staff and residents with dementia." Ageing and Society. 35 (2): 270-297.

Anne Cutler Professor

Anne Cutler

Anne Cutler studied languages and psychology at the Universities of Melbourne, Berlin and Bonn, taught German at Monash University, but embraced psycholinguistics as soon as it emerged as an independent sub-discipline, taking a PhD in the subject at the University of Texas. Postdoctoral fellowships at MIT and Sussex University followed, and from 1982 to 1993 a staff position at the Medical Research Council Applied Psychology Unit in Cambridge. In 1993 she became a director at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, a post she held till 2013. She was also professor of comparative psycholinguistics at the Radboud University Nijmegen from 1995 to 2013, and, from 2006 to 2013, part-time Research Professor in MARCS Auditory Laboratories. In 2013 she took up a full-time position at the MARCS Institute.

Recent Publications

  1. Abstraction and the (misnamed) Language Familiarity Effect.

    Bibliography

    Elizabeth Johnson, Laurence Bruggeman, and Anne Cutler. 2017. "Abstraction and the (misnamed) Language Familiarity Effect.." doi: 10.1111/cogs.12520.

  2. Early development of abstract language knowledge: Evidence from perception-production transfer of birth-language memory

    Bibliography

    Jiyoun Choi, Anne Cutler, and Mirjam Broersma. 2017. "Early development of abstract language knowledge: Evidence from perception-production transfer of birth-language memory." Royal Society Open Science. 4: 160660. doi: 10.1098/rsos.160660.

  3. Listening in first and second language

    Bibliography

    Cutler, Anne, and Farrell, Janise. 2016. "Listening in first and second language". In The TESOL Encyclopedia of Language Teaching, New York: Wiley.

  4. Prediction, Bayesian inference and feedback in speech recognition

    Bibliography

    Dennis Norris, James McQueen, and Anne Cutler. 17-20 August 2016. "Prediction, Bayesian inference and feedback in speech recognition". 4-18. London, UK.

  5. Auditory and phonetic category formation

    Bibliography

    Goudbeek, Martijn, Smits, Roel, Cutler, Anne, and Swingley, Daniel. 2017. "Auditory and phonetic category formation". In Handbook of Categorization in Cognitive Science, 687-708. Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Paola Escudero Associate Professor

Paola Escudero

Paola Escudero is an Associate Professor at The MARCS Institute and teaches within the Linguistics Major of the School of Humanities and Communication Arts. She started at UWS in January 2011, after a research position at the University of Amsterdam from 2005 to 2010 and a Visiting Assistant Professorship at the University of California in Los Angeles. She has been visiting researcher at the UCLA Baby Lab since 2009 and was Visiting Professor at the Amsterdam Brain and Cognition Centre at the University of Amsterdam from 2011 to 2014. Currently, she is the MARCS Internship Coordinator and chairs the Teaching and Learning Committee at MARCS. She is sole CI of an ARC Discovery Project (2013-2015) examining speaker and accent normalization in human infants and adults and in zebra finches. In 2010 she received the Heineken Young Scientists Award for Cognitive Science and in 2014 the Vice Chancellor’s Excellence in Research (Researcher of the Year) award at UWS.

Recent Publications

  1. The relationship between perception and production of Brazilian Portuguese vowels in European Spanish monolinguals

    Bibliography

    J Elvin, D Williams, and Paola Escudero. 2016. "The relationship between perception and production of Brazilian Portuguese vowels in European Spanish monolinguals." Loquens: Spanish Journal of Speech Sciences. 3 (2) doi: doi:doi:10.3989/loquens.2016.031.

  2. When speaker identity is unavoidable: Neural processing of speaker identity cues in natural speech

    Bibliography

    Alba Tuninetti, K Chladkova, V Peter, N Schiller, and Paola Escudero. 2017. "When speaker identity is unavoidable: Neural processing of speaker identity cues in natural speech." Brain and Language. (174): 42-49. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2017.07.001.

  3. Indexical and linguistic processing by 12-month-olds: Discrimination of speaker, accent and vowel differences

    Bibliography

    Karen Mulak, Cory Bonn, Katerina Chladkova, Richard Aslin, and Paola Escudero. 2017. "Indexical and linguistic processing by 12-month-olds: Discrimination of speaker, accent and vowel differences." PLOS One. 12 (5): e0176762. doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0176762.

  4. The role of positive affect in the acquisition of word-object associations

    Bibliography

    Nicole Traynor, Karen Mulak, R Robbins, G Weidemann, and Paola Escudero. 2016. "The role of positive affect in the acquisition of word-object associations". In Proceedings of the Sixteenth Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 9-12. Parramatta.

  5. Acoustic Properties Predict Perception of Unfamiliar Dutch Vowels by Adult Australian English and Peruvian Spanish Listeners

    Bibliography

    Samra Alispahic, Karen Mulak, and Paola Escudero. 2017. "Acoustic Properties Predict Perception of Unfamiliar Dutch Vowels by Adult Australian English and Peruvian Spanish Listeners." Frontiers in Psychology. 8: doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00052.

Bethwyn Evans Doctor

Bethwyn Evans

Bethwyn Evans’ research focuses on language change and language contact, and the role that linguistics plays in understanding the non-linguistic past. She currently works on Austronesian and Papuan languages in Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. Beth is in the Linguistics Department in the School of Culture, History and Language in the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific.

Recent Publications

  1. Demographic correlates of language diversity

    Bibliography

    Greenhill, Simon, Bowern, Claire, and Evans, Bethwyn. 2015. "Demographic correlates of language diversity". In The Routledge Handbook of Historical Linguistics,

Nicholas Evans Distinguished Professor

Nicholas Evans

Nicholas (‘Nick’) Evans is the Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language. His central research focus is the diversity of human language and what this can tell us about the nature of language, culture, deep history, and the possibilities of the human mind. He is especially interested in the ongoing dialectic between primary documentation of little-known languages, and induction from these to more general questions about the nature of language. His 2010 book Dying Words: Endangered Languages and What They Have to Tell Us sets out a broad program for the field’s engagement with the planet’s dwindling linguistic diversity.

Nick has carried out fieldwork on several languages of Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea, particularly Kayardild, Bininj Gun-wok, Dalabon, Ilgar, Iwaidja, Marrku and Nen, with published grammars of Kayardild (1995) and Bininj Gun-wok (2003), and dictionaries of Kayardild (1992) and Dalabon (2004). Among his many (co)edited volumes, one on The Dynamics of Insubordination (with Honoré Watanabe; John Benjamins) and The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis (with Michael Fortescue and Marianne Mithun) will shortly be appearing.

Currently Nick is collecting data from the diverse and little-studied region of Southern New Guinea. His ARC Laureate Project The Wellsprings of Linguistic Diversity examines how microvariation at speech community level relates to macro-diversity of languages and language families, and he is leading a team in a cross-linguistic study of how diverse grammars underpin social cognition.

Recent Publications

  1. Introduction

    Bibliography

    Fortescue, Michael, Mithun, Marianne, and Evans, Nicholas. 2017. "Introduction". In The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis, 1-18. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  2. Polysynthesis in Northern Australia

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas. 2017. "Polysynthesis in Northern Australia". In The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis, 336-362. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  3. The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis

    Bibliography

    Michael Fortescue, Marianne Mithun, and Nicholas Evans. 2017. The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis. Oxford : Oxford University Press.

  4. Quantification in Nen

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas. 2017. "Quantification in Nen". In Handbook of Quantifiers in Natural Language, 573-609. Springer.

  5. Three Greedy Emu Myths

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas, Gangali, Toby, and Namarnyilk, Jimmy Karlarriya. 2017. "Three Greedy Emu Myths". In Something About Emus, 115-128. Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press.

Janet Fletcher Associate Professor

Janet Fletcher

Janet Fletcher is Professor of Phonetics in the School of Languages and Linguistics. She has held previous appointments at the University of Edinburgh, the Ohio State University, and Macquarie University. Her research interests include phonetic theory, laboratory phonology, prosodic phonology, articulatory and acoustic modelling of prosodic effects in various languages. She is currently working on phonetic variation, and prosody, and intonation in Indigenous Australian languages and has commenced projects on selected languages of Oceania. She is a member of the Research Unit for Indigenous Language in the School of Languages and Linguistics.

Recent Publications

  1. Australian English. Pronunciation and Transcription

    Bibliography

    Felicity Cox, and Janet Fletcher. 2017. Australian English. Pronunciation and Transcription. Port Melbourne, Victoria : Cambridge University Press.

  2. Bibliography

    Janet Fletcher, and Warren Fletcher. 2016. New Zealand English Journal. 29-30: 77-93.

  3. Can you t[æ]ll I’m from M[æ]lbourne? An overview of the DRESS and TRAP vowels before /l/ as a regional accent marker in Australian English

    Bibliography

    Deborah Loakes, John Hajek, and Janet Fletcher. 2017. "Can you t[æ]ll I’m from M[æ]lbourne? An overview of the DRESS and TRAP vowels before /l/ as a regional accent marker in Australian English." English Worldwide. 38 (1): 29-49. doi: 10.1075/eww.38.1.03loa.

  4. The role of closure duration in the perception of word-initial geminates in Kelantan Malay

    Bibliography

    Mohd Hilmi Hamzah, Janet Fletcher, and John Hajek. 2016. "The role of closure duration in the perception of word-initial geminates in Kelantan Malay". In Sixteenth Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 85-88. Sydney.

  5. Nasal aerodynamics and coarticulation in Bininj Kunwok: Smoothing Spline Analysis of Variance

    Bibliography

    Hywel Stoakes, Janet Fletcher, and Andrew Butcher. 2016. "Nasal aerodynamics and coarticulation in Bininj Kunwok: Smoothing Spline Analysis of Variance". In 16th Speech Science and Technology Conference, 113-116. Sydney.

Caroline Jones Associate Professor

Caroline Jones

Caroline Jones investigates variation and change in the spoken language of adults across different languages and dialects and across generations, with a focus on pronunciation (phonetics and phonology). In her current projects in northern Australia she works with speakers and community members to describe the everyday speech patterns of adults in varieties of north Australian Kriol and English, and how these varieties are learned by infants and young children. Caroline has worked with speakers of Australian Aboriginal languages since 1993 and has ongoing projects in the documentation and learning of these languages. An additional interest across her work is to develop technology to improve efficiency in language corpus research (transcription, visualization) and to improve access and participation by community members. Caroline has a PhD in Linguistics from University of Massachusetts in 2003. She worked at UNSW and University of Wollongong, and is now an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at Western Sydney University.

Recent Publications

  1. Bilingualism, language shift and the corresponding expansion of spatial cognitive systems

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, Caroline Jones, and Cassandra Algy. 2016. "Bilingualism, language shift and the corresponding expansion of spatial cognitive systems." Language Sciences. 54: 1-13. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.langsci.2015.06.002.

  2. F4, a simple interface for efficient annotation

    Bibliography

    Caroline Jones, and Amit German. 2016. "F4, a simple interface for efficient annotation." Language Documentation & Conservation. 10: 347-355.

  3. Pre-service teachers’ knowledge of language concepts: relationships to field experiences

    Bibliography

    Caroline Jones, and Deborah Tetley. 2014. "Pre-service teachers’ knowledge of language concepts: relationships to field experiences." Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties. 19 (1): 17-32. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19404158.2014.891530.

Evan Kidd Associate Professor

Evan Kidd

Evan Kidd's research is in psycholinguistics and developmental psychology. His current research interests include sentence processing in children and adults, the acquisition of complex sentences, the acquisition of verb argument structure and verbal morphology, how children deal with lexical and syntactic ambiguity in acquisition, and the role of symbolic play in language and socio-cognitive development. He conducts research on a number of languages, including English, German, Italian, Finnish, Cantonese, and Persian. Evan was awarded a BBSc (Hons) in 1999 and a PhD (Psycholinguistics) in 2004, both from La Trobe University. He worked at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology as a postdoctoral research associate between 2003 – 2005, and as a Lecturer and then Senior Lecturer in Psychology at The University of Manchester (UK) between 2005–2012. From 2008–2011 he was also a Charles La Trobe Research Fellow at La Trobe University.

Recent Publications

  1. Four-year-old Cantonese-speaking children's online processing of relative clauses: A permutation analysis

    Bibliography

    Angel Chan, Wenchun Yang, Franklin Chang, and Evan Kidd. 2017. "Four-year-old Cantonese-speaking children's online processing of relative clauses: A permutation analysis." Journal of Child Language. 1-30. doi: 10.1017/S0305000917000198.

  2. Language use statistics and prototypical grapheme colours predict synaesthetes’ and non-synaesthetes’ word-colour associations

    Bibliography

    Evan Kidd, and Stephanie Goodhew. 2017. "Language use statistics and prototypical grapheme colours predict synaesthetes’ and non-synaesthetes’ word-colour associations." Acta Psychologica. 173: 73-86. doi: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2016.12.008.

  3. Priming the comprehension of German object relative clauses

    Bibliography

    Silke Brandt, Sanjo Nitschke, and Evan Kidd. 2017. "Priming the comprehension of German object relative clauses." Language Learning and Development.. 13 (3): 241-261. doi: 10.1080/15475441.2016.1235500.

  4. An investigation into the effect of play-based instruction on the development of play skills and oral language: A 6-month longitudinal study

    Bibliography

    Karen Stagnitti, Alison Bailey, Edwina Stevenson, Emily Reynolds, and Evan Kidd. 2016. "An investigation into the effect of play-based instruction on the development of play skills and oral language: A 6-month longitudinal study." Journal of Early Childhood Research. 14 (4): 389-406. doi: 10.1177/1476718X15579741.

  5. On-line processing of noun modification in young children with high functioning autism

    Bibliography

    Edith Bavin, Luke Prendergast, Evan Kidd, Emma Baker, and Cheryl Dissanayake. March 2016. "On-line processing of noun modification in young children with high functioning autism." International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders. 51 (2): 137-147. doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12191.

Felicity Meakins Doctor

Felicity Meakins

Felicity Meakins is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Queensland. She is a field linguist who specialises in the documentation of Australian Indigenous languages in the Victoria River District of the Northern Territory and the effect of English on Indigenous languages. She has worked as a community linguist as well as an academic over the past 16 years, facilitating language revitalisation programs, consulting on Native Title claims and conducting research into Indigenous languages. She has compiled a number of dictionaries and grammars of traditional Indigenous languages and has written numerous papers on language change in Australia.

Recent Publications

  1. A replicable acoustic measure of lenition and the nature of variability in Gurindji stops

    Bibliography

    Tom Ennever, Felicity Meakins, and Erich Round. 2017. "A replicable acoustic measure of lenition and the nature of variability in Gurindji stops." Laboratory Phonology. 8 (1): 1-32. doi: https://doi.org/10.5334/labphon.18.

  2. Possessor dissension: agreement mismatch in Ngumpin-Yapa possessive constructions

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, and Rachel Nordlinger. 2017. "Possessor dissension: agreement mismatch in Ngumpin-Yapa possessive constructions." Linguistic Typology. 21 (1): 143-176.

  3. The carbines were talking English: Violence and language in the colonisation of Gurindji country

    Bibliography

    Meakins, Felicity. 2017. "The carbines were talking English: Violence and language in the colonisation of Gurindji country". In Still in my mind: Gurindji location, experience and visuality, 73-75. Brisbane: UQ Art Museum.

  4. Searching for “Agent Zero”: The origins of a relative case

    Bibliography

    J van den Bos, Felicity Meakins, and Cassandra Algy. 2017. "Searching for “Agent Zero”: The origins of a relative case." Language Ecology. 1 (1): 4-24.

  5. Bilingualism, language shift and the corresponding expansion of spatial cognitive systems

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, Caroline Jones, and Cassandra Algy. 2016. "Bilingualism, language shift and the corresponding expansion of spatial cognitive systems." Language Sciences. 54: 1-13. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.langsci.2015.06.002.

Rachel Nordlinger Associate Professor

Rachel Nordlinger

Rachel Nordlinger is the Director of the Research Unit for Indigenous Language in the School of Languages and Linguistics. Rachel’s research centres around the description and documentation of Australia's indigenous languages, and she has worked with the Bilinarra, Wambaya, Gudanji, Murrinhpatha and Marri Ngarr communities to record and preserve their traditional languages. She has also published on syntactic and morphological theory, and in particular the challenges posed by the complex grammatical structures of Australian Aboriginal languages. She is the author of numerous academic articles in international journals, and five books, including A Grammar of Wambaya (Pacific Linguistics, 1998), Constructive Case: Evidence from Australian languages (CSLI Publications, 1998) and A Grammar of Bilinarra (Mouton de Gruyter, 2014, coauthored with Dr. Felicity Meakins). She is co-editor (with Harold Koch) of The Languages and Linguistics of Australia (Mouton de Gruyter, 2014).

Recent Publications

  1. The languages of the Daly River region (Northern Australia)

    Bibliography

    Nordlinger, Rachel. 2017. "The languages of the Daly River region (Northern Australia)". In The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis, 782-807. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  2. The acquisition of Murrinhpatha (Northern Australia)

    Bibliography

    Forshaw, W, Davidson, Lucy, Kelly, Barbara, Nordlinger, Rachel, Wigglesworth, Gillian, and Blythe, J. 2017. "The acquisition of Murrinhpatha (Northern Australia)". In The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis, 473-494. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  3. Possessor dissension: agreement mismatch in Ngumpin-Yapa possessive constructions

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, and Rachel Nordlinger. 2017. "Possessor dissension: agreement mismatch in Ngumpin-Yapa possessive constructions." Linguistic Typology. 21 (1): 143-176.

  4. When magnets collide: digital preservation and access of at-risk audiovisual archives in a remote Aboriginal community

    Bibliography

    Array

  5. The Alignment of Prosody and Clausal Structure in Dalabon

    Bibliography

    Bella Ross, Janet Fletcher, and Rachel Nordlinger. 2016. "The Alignment of Prosody and Clausal Structure in Dalabon." Australian Journal of Linguistics. 36 (1): 1-27. doi: 10.1080/07268602.2016.1109434.

Alan Rumsey Professor

Alan Rumsey

Alan Rumsey is a linguistic anthropologist who has worked in field locations across northern Australia and Papua New Guinea. He is currently involved in a major collaborative research project on 'Children's Language Learning and the Development of Intersubjectivity'. Other recent projects include an interdisciplinary comparative one on verbal art which resulted in the volume Sung Tales from the Papua New Guinea Highlands.

Recent Publications

  1. Dependency and relative determination in language acquisition: The case of Ku Waru

    Bibliography

    Rumsey, Alan. 2017. "Dependency and relative determination in language acquisition: The case of Ku Waru". In Dependencies in Language: On the Causal Ontology of Linguistic Systems, 97-114. Berlin: Language Science Press.

  2. Monologue and Dialogism in Highland New Guinea Verbal Art

    Bibliography

    Rumsey, Alan. 2017. "Monologue and Dialogism in Highland New Guinea Verbal Art". In The Monologic Imagination, 59-79. New York: Oxford University Press.

  3. IN PRESS: Flexibles and polyvalance in Ku Waru: A development perspective

    Bibliography

    Merlan, Francesca, and Rumsey, Alan. 2017. "IN PRESS: Flexibles and polyvalance in Ku Waru: A development perspective". In Lexical Polycategoriality: Cross-linguistic, Cross-theoretical and Language Acquisition Approaches, 307-341. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

  4. Mana, power and ‘pawa’ in the Pacific and beyond

    Bibliography

    Rumsey, Alan. 2016. "Mana, power and ‘pawa’ in the Pacific and beyond". In New Mana: Transformations of a Classic Concept in Pacific Languages and Cultures, Canberra: ANU Press.

  5. Language ecology, language policy and pedagogical practice in a Papua New Guinea highland community

    Bibliography

    Francesca Merlan, and Alan Rumsey. 2015. "Language ecology, language policy and pedagogical practice in a Papua New Guinea highland community." Journal of the Linguistic Society of Papua New Guinea. 33 (1): 82-96.

Jane Simpson Professor

Jane Simpson

Jane Simpson has carried out fieldwork on Indigenous Australian languages since 1979, and received a PhD in linguistics from MIT in 1983 for a study of Warlpiri in the Lexical-Functional Grammar framework. See her full profile here.

Recent Publications

  1. Working Verbs: The Spread of a Loan Word in Australian Language

    Bibliography

    Simpson, Jane. 2016. "Working Verbs: The Spread of a Loan Word in Australian Language". In Language, Land and Song: Studies in Honour of Luise Hercus, 244-62. London: EL Publishing.

  2. Language, Land and Song: Studies in Honour of Luise Hercus

    Bibliography

    Peter Austin, Harold Koch, and Jane Simpson. 2016. Language, Land and Song: Studies in Honour of Luise Hercus. London : EL Publishing.

  3. Daisy Bates in the digital world

    Bibliography

    Thieberger, Nick, Austin, Peter, Koch, Harold, and Simpson, Jane. 2016. "Daisy Bates in the digital world". In Language, land and song: Studies in honour of Luise Hercus, 102-114. London: EL Publishing.

  4. Teaching minority Indigenous languages at universities

    Bibliography

    Simpson, Jane. 2014. "Teaching minority Indigenous languages at universities". In FEL XVIII Okinawa: Indigenous Languages: their Value to the Community, 54-58. Batheaston, UK: dation for Endangered Languages.

  5. Pama-Nyungan

    Bibliography

    Simpson, Jane. 2014. "Pama-Nyungan". In Oxford Handbook of Derivational Morphology, 651-668. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kim Sterelny Professor

Kim Sterelny

Kim Sterelny's main research interests are Philosophy of Biology, Philosophy of Psychology and Philosophy of Mind. He is the author of The Representational Theory of Mind and the co-author of Language and Reality (with Michael Devitt) and Sex and Death: An Introduction to Philosophy of Biology (with Paul Griffiths). He is Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. In addition to philosophy, Kim spends his time eating curries, drinking red wine, bushwalking and bird watching. Kim has been a Visiting Professor at Simon Fraser University in Canada, and at Cal Tech and the University of Maryland, College Park, in the USA.

Recent Publications

  1. Artifacts, Symbols, Thoughts

    Bibliography

    Kim Sterelny. 2017. "Artifacts, Symbols, Thoughts." Biological Theory. (THEMATIC ISSUE ARTICLE: SYMBOLS, SIGNALS, AND THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL RECORD II) doi: 10.1007/s13752-017-0277-3.

  2. Cultural evolution in California and Paris

    Bibliography

    Kim Sterelny. 2017. "Cultural evolution in California and Paris." Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences. 62: 42-50. doi: 10.1016/j.shpsc.2016.12.005.

  3. Religion re-explained

    Bibliography

    Kim Sterelny. 2017. "Religion re-explained." Religion, Brain & Behaviour. 1-20. doi: 10.1080/2153599X.2017.1323779.

  4. In defence of story-telling

    Bibliography

    Adrian Currie, and Kim Sterelny. 2017. "In defence of story-telling." Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A. 62: 14-21. doi: 10.1016/j.shpsa.2017.03.003.

  5. IN PRESS: Culture and the Extended Phenotype: Cognition and Material Culture in Deep Time

    Bibliography

    Sterelny, Kim, Newen, Albert, de Bruin, Leon, and Gallagher, Shaun. 2017. "IN PRESS: Culture and the Extended Phenotype: Cognition and Material Culture in Deep Time". In The Oxford Handbook of Cognition: Embodied, Embedded, Enactive and Extended,

Nick Thieberger Doctor

Nick Thieberger

Nick Thieberger has worked with speakers of Australian languages since the early 1980s. He established the Aboriginal language centre Wangka Maya in Port Hedland in the late 1980s, then worked at AIATSIS building the Aboriginal Studies Electronic Data Archive in the early 1990s. He has written a grammar of South Efate, a language from central Vanuatu that was the first to link media to the analysis, allowing verification of examples used in analytical claims. In 2003 he helped establish PARADISEC (paradisec.org.au), a digital archive of recorded ethnographic material. He is a co-founder of the Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity (RNLD) and in 2008 he established a linguistic archive at the University of Hawai'i. He is interested in developments in e-humanities methods and their potential to improve research practice and he is now developing methods for creation of reusable data sets from fieldwork on previously unrecorded languages. He is the Editor of the journal Language Documentation & Conservation. He taught in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and is now an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the University of Melbourne. Please see his homepage at languages-linguistics.unimelb.edu.au/thieberger for full details.

Recent Publications

  1. Carl-Georg von Brandenstein's legacy: The past in the present

    Bibliography

    Thieberger, Nick. 2017. "Carl-Georg von Brandenstein's legacy: The past in the present". In The German Language Tradition of Ethnography in Australia, 435-451. Canberra: ANU Press.

  2. Missionary-induced language change, on the trail of the conditional in Nafsan, central Vanuatu

    Bibliography

    Nick Thieberger. 2017. "Missionary-induced language change, on the trail of the conditional in Nafsan, central Vanuatu." History and Philosophy of the Language Sciences.

  3. LD&C possibilities for the next decade

    Bibliography

    Nick Thieberger. 2017. "LD&C possibilities for the next decade." Language Documentation & Conservation. 11: 1-4.

  4. Developing collection management tools to create more robust and reliable linguistic data

    Bibliography

    Holton, Gary, Hooshiar, Kavon, and Thieberger, Nick. 2017. "Developing collection management tools to create more robust and reliable linguistic data". In Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Computational Methods for Endangered Languages,

  5. From Small to Big Data: paper manuscripts to RDF triples of Australian Indigenous Vocabularies

    Bibliography

    Thieberger, Nick, and Tuohy, Conal. 2017. "From Small to Big Data: paper manuscripts to RDF triples of Australian Indigenous Vocabularies". In Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Computational Methods for Endangered Languages,

Catherine Travis Professor

Catherine Travis

Catherine Travis is Professor of Modern European Languages in the School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics at the ANU. Her research addresses questions related to linguistic and social factors impacting on language variation and change, in particular in socially diverse communities. Currently, her two main projects are: variation and change in Australian English, examined via the study of spontaneous speech of diverse social groups (including migrant communities) in Sydney, spanning 100 years in apparent time (Sydney Speaks); and language contact in a long-standing Spanish-English bilingual community in northern New Mexico, USA (NMSEB). Catherine has a BA/Asian Studies (Hons) degree from the ANU (1992), and a PhD in Linguistics and Spanish from La Trobe University (2002). She worked at the University of New Mexico, in Albuquerque for 10 years, before coming to the ANU in 2012.

Recent Publications

  1. Gauging convergence on the ground: code-switching in the community

    Bibliography

    Catherine Travis, and Rena Torres Cacoullos. August, 2015. "Gauging convergence on the ground: code-switching in the community." International Journal of Bilingualism (Guest editors - Special Issue). 19 (4): 365-480. doi: 10.1177/1367006913516042.

  2. Cross-language priming: A view from bilingual speech

    Bibliography

    Catherine Travis, Rena Torres Cacoullos, and Kidd Evan. March, 2017. "Cross-language priming: A view from bilingual speech." Bilingualism: Language and Cognition. 20 (2 Special issue edited by Gerrit Jan Kootstra and Pieter Muysken): 283-298. doi: 10.1017/S1366728915000127.

  3. Different registers, different grammars? Subject expression in English conversation and narrative

    Bibliography

    Catherine Travis, and Amy Lindstrom. March, 2016. "Different registers, different grammars? Subject expression in English conversation and narrative." Language Variation and Change. 28 (1): 103-128. doi: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954394515000174.

  4. Two languages, one effect: Structural priming in code-switching

    Bibliography

    Rena Torres Cacoullos, and Catherine Travis. August, 2016. "Two languages, one effect: Structural priming in code-switching." Bilingualism: Language and Cognition. 19 (4): 733-753. doi: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1366728914000406.

  5. Foundations for the study of subject pronoun expression in Spanish in contact with English: Assessing interlinguistic (dis)similarity via intralinguistic variability

    Bibliography

    Torres Cacoullos, Rena, Travis, Catherine, Carvalho, Ana M., and Orozco, Rafael. 2015. "Foundations for the study of subject pronoun expression in Spanish in contact with English: Assessing interlinguistic (dis)similarity via intralinguistic variability". In Subject pronoun expression in Spanish: A cross-dialectal perspective, 83-102. Georgetown: Georgetown University Press.

Gillian Wigglesworth Professor

Gillian Wigglesworth

Gillian Wigglesworth's research work focuses around first and second language acquisition in monolingual, bilingual and multilingual settings, and she is currently working in remote Indigenous communities documenting children’s language learning at home and at school. She has published widely in first and second language learning, bilingualism, as well as language testing. She is very widely published in international journals and books with over one hundred publications. She is author or editor on several books including Simpson, J. & Wigglesworth, G. (Eds.) 2008. Children’s language and multilingualism: Indigenous language use at home and school. UK, Continuum International; Wigglesworth, G. (Ed.) 2003 The kaleidoscope of adult second language learning: learner, teacher and researcher perspective, Sydney, NCELTR and Ng, B.C. & Wigglesworth, G. 2007. Bilingualism, an advanced resource book. London, Routledge.

Recent Publications

  1. The acquisition of Murrinhpatha (Northern Australia)

    Bibliography

    Forshaw, W, Davidson, Lucy, Kelly, Barbara, Nordlinger, Rachel, Wigglesworth, Gillian, and Blythe, J. 2017. "The acquisition of Murrinhpatha (Northern Australia)". In The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis, 473-494. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  2. Language Assessment in Indigenous Contexts in Australia and Canada

    Bibliography

    Wigglesworth, Gillian, and Baker, Beverly. 2016. "Language Assessment in Indigenous Contexts in Australia and Canada". In Encyclopedia of Language and Education,, Springer.

  3. Task and performance based assessment

    Bibliography

    Wigglesworth, Gillian, and Frost, Kellie. 2016. "Task and performance based assessment". In Encyclopedia of Language and Education, Springer.

  4. Capturing Accuracy in Second Language Performance: The Case for a Weighted Clause Ratio

    Bibliography

    Pauline Foster, and Gillian Wigglesworth. March 30, 2016. "Capturing Accuracy in Second Language Performance: The Case for a Weighted Clause Ratio." Annual Review of Applied Linguistics. 36: 98-116. doi: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0267190515000082.

  5. Apprendre une langue dans les régions isolées de l’Australie aborigène

    Bibliography

    Wigglesworth, Gillian. 2016. "Apprendre une langue dans les régions isolées de l’Australie aborigène". In Melanges: A Festschrift in honour of Professor Anne Freadman on the occasion of her retirement, Paris: Librairie Garnier.

Janet Wiles Professor

Janet Wiles

Janet Wiles's research interests are in: complex systems biology, computational neuroscience, evolution of language, computational modeling methods, artificial intelligence and artificial life, human memory, language and cognition. She received her PhD from Sydney University. She is a member of the Complex & Intelligent Systems Research Division (CIS) in UQ's School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering (ITEE).

Recent Publications

  1. Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction

    Bibliography

    Scott Heath, Gautier Durantin, Marie Boden, Kristyn Hensby, Jonathan Taufatofua, Ola Olsson, Paul Pounds, Jason Weigel, and Janet Wiles. 2017. "Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction." Frontiers in Robotics and AI. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/frobt.2017.00027.

  2. Social Moments: A Perspective on Interaction for Social Robotics

    Bibliography

    Gautier Durantin, Scott Heath, and Janet Wiles. 2017. "Social Moments: A Perspective on Interaction for Social Robotics." Frontiers in Robotics and AI. (4): 24. doi: doi: 10.3389/frobt.2017.00024.

  3. Using Visual Text Analytics to Examine Broadcast Interviewing

    Bibliography

    Daniel Angus, Richard Fitzgerald, Christina Atay, and Janet Wiles. 2016. "Using Visual Text Analytics to Examine Broadcast Interviewing." Discourse, Contact & Media. 11: 38-49.. doi: 10.1016/j.dcm.2015.11.002.

  4. Acquired Codes of Meaning in Data Visualization and Infographics: Beyond Perceptual Primitives

    Bibliography

    Lydia Bryne, Daniel Angus, and Janet Wiles. 2016. "Acquired Codes of Meaning in Data Visualization and Infographics: Beyond Perceptual Primitives." IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics. 22 (1): 509-518. doi: 10.1109/TVCG.2015.2467321.

  5. Hello Harlie: Enabling Speech Monitoring Through Chat-Bot Conversations

    Bibliography

    David Ireland, Christina Atay, Jacki Liddle, Dana Bradford, Helen Lee, Olivia Rushin, Thomas Mullins, Daniel Angus, Janet Wiles, Simon McBride, and Adam Vogel. 2016. "Hello Harlie: Enabling Speech Monitoring Through Chat-Bot Conversations." Studies in Health Technology and Informatics.. 227: 55. doi: 10.3233/978-1-61499-666-8-55.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University

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