Chief Investigators

Anthony Angwin Doctor

Anthony Angwin

Anthony Angwin's research interests are centred around the investigation of neurogenic communication disorders.

Anthony is a speech pathologist and senior lecturer conducting research on psycholinguistics and neurogenic communication disorders. In particular, his research interests are focussed upon the investigation of communication impairments associated with Parkinson's disease, stroke and dementia.

Anne Cutler Distinguished Professor

Anne Cutler

Anne Cutler studied languages and psychology at the Universities of Melbourne, Berlin and Bonn, taught German at Monash University, but embraced psycholinguistics as soon as it emerged as an independent sub-discipline, taking a PhD in the subject at the University of Texas. Postdoctoral fellowships at MIT and Sussex University followed, and from 1982 to 1993 a staff position at the Medical Research Council Applied Psychology Unit in Cambridge. In 1993 she became a director at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, a post she held till 2013. She was also professor of comparative psycholinguistics at the Radboud University Nijmegen from 1995 to 2013, and, from 2006 to 2013, part-time Research Professor in MARCS Auditory Laboratories. In 2013 she took up a full-time position at the MARCS Institute.

Paola Escudero Associate Professor

Paola Escudero

Paola Escudero is based at The MARCS Institute. Her main interest within CoEDL is on how the learning of phonetic detail takes place in multilingual communities. She collaborates with CI Kidd (Processing) on statistical learning in monolingual and bilingual infants, with CI Fletcher (Processing/Shape) on comparing Australian English accents, with AI Byrd (Technology Thread) and Postdoc Ellison (Shape) on an app that can be used to collect processing data in the field, and with PhD Kashima, Postdocs Ellison and Schokkin (Shape) on the phonetic description of PNG languages. Paola’s team is also collaborating with CIs Rumsey and Wigglesworth’s teams (Learning) on adapting laboratory methods for testing processing questions in the field, as well as with Postdoc Durantin (Evolution) on EEG analysis techniques that can be applied to individual language learners. Paola was awarded an ARC Future Fellowship which she started in 2017.

Recent Publications

  1. Listeners cope with speaker and accent variation differently: Evidence from the Go/No-go task.

    Bibliography

    Buddhamas Kriengwatana, Paola Escudero, and Josephine Terry. 2014. "Listeners cope with speaker and accent variation differently: Evidence from the Go/No-go task.". In Proceedings of the 15th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology 2-5 December 2014, Christchurch.

  2. Acoustic distance explains speaker versus accent normalization in infancy

    Bibliography

    Paola Escudero, Karen Mulak, and Samra Alispahic. 2014. "Acoustic distance explains speaker versus accent normalization in infancy". In Proceedings of the 15th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology 2-5 December 2014, Christchurch.

  3. Comparing acoustic analyses of Australian English vowels from Sydney: Cox (2006) versus AusTalk

    Bibliography

    Jaydene Elvin, and Paola Escudero. 2014. "Comparing acoustic analyses of Australian English vowels from Sydney: Cox (2006) versus AusTalk". In Proceedings of the 15th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology 2-5 December 2014, Christchurch.

  4. Difficulty in discriminating non-native vowels: Are Dutch vowels easier for Australian English than Spanish listeners?

    Bibliography

    Samra Alispahic, Paola Escudero, and Karen Mulak. 2014. "Difficulty in discriminating non-native vowels: Are Dutch vowels easier for Australian English than Spanish listeners?". In Proceedings of Interspeech 2014, Christchurch.

  5. Is more always better? The perception of Dutch vowels by English versus Spanish listeners

    Bibliography

    Samra Alispahic, Paola Escudero, and Karen Mulak. 2014. "Is more always better? The perception of Dutch vowels by English versus Spanish listeners". In Proceedings of the 15th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology 2-5 December 2014, Christchurch.

Bethwyn Evans Doctor

Bethwyn Evans

Bethwyn Evans’s research is focused on language change and language contact, and the role that linguistics plays in understanding our non-linguistic past. She predominantly works on Austronesian and Papuan languages in Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. Beth collaborates with Simon Greenhill on exploring the links between micro- and macro-level processes of language evolution.

Nicholas Evans Distinguished Professor

Nicholas Evans

Nicholas (‘Nick’) Evans is the Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language. His central research focus is the diversity of human language and what this can tell us about the nature of language, culture, deep history, and the possibilities of the human mind. His 2010 book Dying Words: Endangered Languages and What They Have to Tell Us sets out a broad program for the field’s engagement with the planet’s dwindling linguistic diversity. Nick has carried out fieldwork on several languages of Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea, particularly Kayardild, Bininj Gun-wok, Dalabon, Ilgar, Iwaidja, Marrku and Nen, with published grammars of Kayardild (1995) and Bininj Gun-wok (2003), and dictionaries of Kayardild (1992) and Dalabon (2004). His ARC Laureate Project The Wellsprings of Linguistic Diversity examines how microvariation at speech community level relates to macro-diversity of languages and language families, and he is leading a team in a cross-linguistic study of how diverse grammars underpin social cognition.

Recent Publications

  1. Notes on the contemporary knowledge of traditional material culture among the Iwaidja – Cobourg Peninsula, Arnhem Land, Northern Territory 2005-6

    Bibliography

    Kim Akerman, Bruce Birch, and Nicholas Evans. 2014. "Notes on the contemporary knowledge of traditional material culture among the Iwaidja – Cobourg Peninsula, Arnhem Land, Northern Territory 2005-6." Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia. 138 (2): 181-213.

  2. Positional verbs in Nen

    Bibliography

    Nicholas Evans. 2014. "Positional verbs in Nen." Oceanic Linguistics. 53 (2): 225-255.

Janet Fletcher Associate Professor

Janet Fletcher

Janet Fletcher is Professor of Phonetics in the School of Languages and Linguistics. She has held previous appointments at the University of Edinburgh, the Ohio State University, and Macquarie University. Her research interests include phonetic theory, laboratory phonology, prosodic phonology, articulatory and acoustic modelling of prosodic effects in various languages. She is currently working on phonetic variation, and prosody, and intonation in Indigenous Australian languages and has commenced projects on selected languages of Oceania. She is a member of the Research Unit for Indigenous Language in the School of Languages and Linguistics.

Caroline Jones Associate Professor

Caroline Jones

Caroline Jones' research focuses on how we can increase the success and sustainability of Aboriginal language revitalization initiatives, how we can improve early language assessment and intervention, and what strategies support communication with elderly people. She is also interested in ways of making research more efficient and more accessible or participatory with new technology and is Deputy Leader of the CoEDL Future Technologies Thread.

Evan Kidd Associate Professor

Evan Kidd

Evan Kidd is an Associate Professor in the Research School of Psychology at the ANU and is a Senior Investigator at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. He completed his PhD in Psycholinguistics at La Trobe University, and has held academic positions at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, The University of Manchester, and La Trobe University. His research concentrates on language acquisition and language processing across different languages and in different populations.

Recent Publications

  1. Cross-linguistic influence in simultaneous Cantonese–English bilingual children's comprehension of relative clauses

    Bibliography

    Evan Kidd, Angel Chan, and Joie Chiu. 2014. "Cross-linguistic influence in simultaneous Cantonese–English bilingual children's comprehension of relative clauses." Bilingualism: Language and Cognition. 18: 438-452. doi: 10.1017/S1366728914000649.

Felicity Meakins Associate Professor

Felicity Meakins

Felicity Meakins specialises in the documentation of Australian languages in the Victoria River District in northern Australia and the effect of English on Indigenous languages. She has worked as a community linguist and academic, facilitating language revitalisation programs, consulting on Native Title claims and conducting research into Indigenous languages. This work has provided the basis for Case-Marking in Contact (Benjamins, 2011), Bilinarra, Gurindji and Malngin Plants and Animals (NT-LRM, 2012), Gurindji to English Dictionary (Batchelor Press, 2013), Bilinarra to English Dictionary (Batchelor Press, 2013), A Grammar of Bilinarra (with Rachel Nordlinger, Mouton, 2014), Kawarla: How to Make a Coolamon (Batchelor Press, 2015), Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages Since Colonisation (edited with Carmel O'Shannessy, Mouton, 2016) and Yijarni: True Stories from Gurindji Country (edited with Erika Charola, Aboriginal Studies Press, 2016).

Recent Publications

  1. A Grammar of Bilinarra: An Australian Aboriginal Language of the Northern Territory

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, and Rachel Nordlinger. 2014. A Grammar of Bilinarra: An Australian Aboriginal Language of the Northern Territory. Boston : De Gruyter Mouton.

Rachel Nordlinger Professor

Rachel Nordlinger

Rachel Nordlinger is the Director of the Research Unit for Indigenous Language in the School of Languages and Linguistics. Rachel’s research centres around the description and documentation of Australia's indigenous languages, and she has worked with the Bilinarra, Wambaya, Gudanji, Murrinhpatha and Marri Ngarr communities to record and preserve their traditional languages. She has also published on syntactic and morphological theory, and in particular the challenges posed by the complex grammatical structures of Australian Aboriginal languages. She is the author of numerous academic articles in international journals, and five books, including A Grammar of Wambaya (Pacific Linguistics, 1998), Constructive Case: Evidence from Australian languages (CSLI Publications, 1998) and A Grammar of Bilinarra (Mouton de Gruyter, 2014, coauthored with Dr. Felicity Meakins). She is co-editor (with Harold Koch) of The Languages and Linguistics of Australia (Mouton de Gruyter, 2014).

Recent Publications

  1. A Grammar of Bilinarra: An Australian Aboriginal Language of the Northern Territory

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, and Rachel Nordlinger. 2014. A Grammar of Bilinarra: An Australian Aboriginal Language of the Northern Territory. Boston : De Gruyter Mouton.

Alan Rumsey Professor

Alan Rumsey

Alan Rumsey is a Professor of Anthropology in the School of Culture, History and Language, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU. His research fields are Highland New Guinea and Aboriginal Australia, with a focus on speech genres and relations among language, culture and intersubjectivity. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities, a past president of the Australian Anthropological Society and the co-convenor of the ANU Pacific Institute. He is currently involved in collaboration with CoEDL Affiliate Francesca Merlan on a major research project on ‘Children’s Language Learning and the Development of Intersubjectivity’, for which he was funded by an ARC Discovery Outstanding Researcher Award during 2013-16, and in collaboration with CoEDL Affiliate Lauren Reed on a study of a sign language in the Western Highlands of Papua New Guinea that is used in communication with deaf people.

Jane Simpson Professor

Jane Simpson

Jane Simpson has carried out fieldwork on Indigenous Australian languages since 1979, and is Chair of Indigenous Linguistics at the ANU. Jane has worked collaboratively on numerous Indigenous language resources: the Warlpiri dictionary with Affiliate Mary Laughren; Ngaanyatjarra speech register corpus with postdoctoral fellow Inge Kral, and Affiliates Jenny Green and Lizzy Ellis; a Warumungu dictionary and corpus with postdoctoral fellow Samantha Disbray; and with Affiliates Rob Amery and Maryanne Gale on a Ngarrindjeri text corpus. She is also working with CI Gillian Wigglesworth on the language learning experience of Indigenous school children. As Chair of the CoEDL Education Sub-committee, she helps draw together HDR training and other education initiatives, which include the University Languages Portal of Australia.

Kim Sterelny Professor

Kim Sterelny

Kim Sterelny's main research interests are Philosophy of Biology, Philosophy of Psychology and Philosophy of Mind. He is the author of The Representational Theory of Mind and the co-author of Language and Reality (with Michael Devitt) and Sex and Death: An Introduction to Philosophy of Biology (with Paul Griffiths). He is Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. In addition to philosophy, Kim spends his time eating curries, drinking red wine, bushwalking and bird watching. Kim has been a Visiting Professor at Simon Fraser University in Canada, and at Cal Tech and the University of Maryland, College Park, in the USA.

Nick Thieberger Associate Professor

Nick Thieberger

examples used in analytical claims. In 2003 he helped establish PARADISEC, a digital archive of recorded ethnographic material and is now its Director. He is a co-founder of the Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity (RNLD) and in 2008 he established a linguistic archive at the University of Hawai’i. He is interested in developments in digital humanities methods and their potential to improve research practice and he is now developing methods for creation of reusable data sets from fieldwork on previously unrecorded languages. He is the Editor of the journal Language Documentation & Conservation. He is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the University of Melbourne.

Catherine Travis Professor

Catherine Travis

Catherine Travis is Professor of Modern European Languages in the School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics at the ANU. Her work addresses questions related to language evolution at a micro level; she applies quantitative methods to probe the impact of linguistic and social factors on language variation and change in the speech community. In the Centre of Excellence, she leads the Sydney Speaks project, a sociolinguistic study of Australian English, examining the speech of Sydney-siders of diverse social backgrounds, recorded at different times, and born over a 100-year period (from the 1890s to the 1990s). A second project, in collaboration with PI Rena Torres Cacoullos (Penn State University), examines outcomes of language contact in a long-standing Spanish-English bilingual community in New Mexico, USA. A co-authored book deriving from this work, Bilingualism in the Community: Code-switching and Grammars in Contact, has been published by Cambridge University Press.

Gillian Wigglesworth Professor

Gillian Wigglesworth

Gillian Wigglesworth’s expertise is in first and second language acquisition in monolingual, bilingual and multilingual settings. A major focus of her work is in remote Indigenous communities documenting children’s language learning at home and at school, together with CI Jane Simpson (Shape). She is collaborating with other Learning program members to ensure comparable data collection patterns in the acquisition projects taking place in Australia and Papua New Guinea. Her collaboration with CI Janet Wiles (Evolution) investigates the potential of using robots in remote communities for language development, and with Professor Katherine Demuth (Macquarie University, CI, Centre in Cognition and its Disorders) on assessing Indigenous children’s hearing to determine any relationship to phonological awareness development. She is a Deputy Director of the Research Unit for Indigenous Language and Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor at the University of Melbourne.

Janet Wiles Professor

Janet Wiles

Janet Wiles’ research involves bio-inspired computation in complex systems, with applications in cognitive science and biorobotics. She completed a PhD in Computer Science at the University of Sydney, a postdoctoral fellowship in Psychology at the University of Queensland, and served as faculty in the Cognitive Science program for 12 years. In 2003 she formed the Complex and Intelligent Systems research group at the University of Queensland where she has been Professor since 2006. She currently coordinates the UQ node of CoEDL, where her research focuses on social robots and language.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University