Chief Investigators

Anthony Angwin Doctor

Anthony Angwin

Anthony Angwin's research interests are centred around the investigation of neurogenic communication disorders.

Anthony is a speech pathologist and senior lecturer conducting research on psycholinguistics and neurogenic communication disorders. In particular, his research interests are focussed upon the investigation of communication impairments associated with Parkinson's disease, stroke and dementia.

Recent Publications

  1. The impact of auditory white noise on semantic priming

    Bibliography

    Anthony Angwin, Wayne Wilson, David Copland, Robert Barry, Grace Myatt, and Wendy Arnott. 2018. "The impact of auditory white noise on semantic priming." Brain and Language. 180-182: 1-7. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2018.04.001.

  2. Effects of prosodic and semantic cues on facial emotion recognition in relation to autism-like traits

    Bibliography

    Melina West, David Copland, Wendy Arnott, Nicole Nelson, and Anthony Angwin. 2018. "Effects of prosodic and semantic cues on facial emotion recognition in relation to autism-like traits." Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

  3. A neurophysiological study of semantic processing in Parkinson’s disease

    Bibliography

    Anthony Angwin, Nadeeka Dissanayaka, Alison Moorcroft, Katie McMahon, Peter Silburn, and David Copland. 2017. "A neurophysiological study of semantic processing in Parkinson’s disease." Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 23 (1): 78-89.

  4. N400 and emotional word processing in Parkinson's disease

    Bibliography

    Nadeeka Dissanayaka, Tiffany Au, Anthony Angwin, John O'Sullivan, Gerard Byrne, Peter Silburn, Rodney Marsh, George Mellick, and David Copland. 2017. "N400 and emotional word processing in Parkinson's disease." Neuropsychology. 31 (6): 585-595. doi: doi:10.1037/neu0000333.

  5. Lexical ambiguity resolution during sentence processing in Parkinson's disease: an event-related potential study

    Bibliography

    Anthony Angwin, Nadeeka Dissanayaka, Katie McMahon, Peter Silburn, and David Copland. 2017. "Lexical ambiguity resolution during sentence processing in Parkinson's disease: an event-related potential study." PLoS One. 12 (5) doi: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0176281.

Anne Cutler Professor

Anne Cutler

Anne Cutler studied languages and psychology at the Universities of Melbourne, Berlin and Bonn, taught German at Monash University, but embraced psycholinguistics as soon as it emerged as an independent sub-discipline, taking a PhD in the subject at the University of Texas. Postdoctoral fellowships at MIT and Sussex University followed, and from 1982 to 1993 a staff position at the Medical Research Council Applied Psychology Unit in Cambridge. In 1993 she became a director at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, a post she held till 2013. She was also professor of comparative psycholinguistics at the Radboud University Nijmegen from 1995 to 2013, and, from 2006 to 2013, part-time Research Professor in MARCS Auditory Laboratories. In 2013 she took up a full-time position at the MARCS Institute.

Recent Publications

  1. Individual Differences in Infant Speech Segmentation: Achieving the Lexical Shift

    Bibliography

    Evan Kidd, Caroline Junge, Tara Spokes, Lauren Morrison, and Anne Cutler. "Individual Differences in Infant Speech Segmentation: Achieving the Lexical Shift." Infancy. doi: https://doi.org/10.1111/infa.12256.

  2. Listening in First and Second Language

    Bibliography

    Cutler, Anne, and Farrell, Janise. 2018. "Listening in First and Second Language". In The TESOL encyclopedia of language teaching, 1-7. Wiley & Sons.

  3. Similar prosodic structure perceived differently in German and English

    Bibliography

    Heather Kember, Ann-Kathrin Grohe, Katharina Zahner, Bettina Braun, Andrea Weber, and Anne Cutler. 2017. "Similar prosodic structure perceived differently in German and English." Interspeech. 1388-1392.

  4. Early phonology revealed by international adoptees' birth language retention

    Bibliography

    Jiyoun Choi, Mirjam Broersma, and Anne Cutler. 11 July 2017. "Early phonology revealed by international adoptees' birth language retention". In Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 7307-7312.

  5. Abstraction and the (misnamed) Language Familiarity Effect

    Bibliography

    Elizabeth Johnson, Laurence Bruggeman, and Anne Cutler. 2018. "Abstraction and the (misnamed) Language Familiarity Effect." Cognitive Science. 42: 633–645. doi: 10.1111/cogs.12520.

Paola Escudero Associate Professor

Paola Escudero

Paola Escudero is based at The MARCS Institute. Her main interest within CoEDL is on how the learning of phonetic detail takes place in multilingual communities. She collaborates with CI Kidd (Processing) on statistical learning in monolingual and bilingual infants, with CI Fletcher (Processing/Shape) on comparing Australian English accents, with AI Byrd (Technology Thread) and Postdoc Ellison (Shape) on an app that can be used to collect processing data in the field, and with PhD Kashima, Postdocs Ellison and Schokkin (Shape) on the phonetic description of PNG languages. Paola’s team is also collaborating with CIs Rumsey and Wigglesworth’s teams (Learning) on adapting laboratory methods for testing processing questions in the field, as well as with Postdoc Durantin (Evolution) on EEG analysis techniques that can be applied to individual language learners. Paola was recently awarded an ARC Future Fellowship which she will start in 2017.

Recent Publications

  1. In press: The development of fast-mapping and novel word retention strategies in monolingual and bilingual infants

    Bibliography

    M Kalashnikova, Paola Escudero, and Evan Kidd. in press. "In press: The development of fast-mapping and novel word retention strategies in monolingual and bilingual infants." Developmental Science.

  2. One way or another: Evidence for perceptual asymmetry in pre-attentive learning of non-native contrasts

    Bibliography

    Liquan Liu, Alba Tuninetti, Paola Escudero, and Jia Hoong Ong. 2018. "One way or another: Evidence for perceptual asymmetry in pre-attentive learning of non-native contrasts." Frontiers in Psychology. 9: 162. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00162.

  3. Vocabulary matters! The relationship between verbal fluency and measures of inhibitory control in monolingual and bilingual children

    Bibliography

    Gloria Pino Escobar, Marina Kalashnikova, and Paola Escudero. 2018. "Vocabulary matters! The relationship between verbal fluency and measures of inhibitory control in monolingual and bilingual children." Journal of Experimental Child Psychology,. 170: 177-189.

  4. Uncovering the acoustic vowel space of a previously undescribed language: The vowels of Nambo

    Bibliography

    Eri Kashima, D Williams, Mark Ellison, Dineke Schokkin, and Paola Escudero. 2016. "Uncovering the acoustic vowel space of a previously undescribed language: The vowels of Nambo." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 139 (6): EL252-EL256. doi: https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4954395.

  5. Directional Asymmetries in Vowel Perception of Adult Nonnative Listeners Do Not Change Over Time With Language Experience

    Bibliography

    Buddhamas Pralle Kriengwatana, and Paola Escudero. 2017. "Directional Asymmetries in Vowel Perception of Adult Nonnative Listeners Do Not Change Over Time With Language Experience." Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. 60 (4): 1088-1093. doi: 10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0050.

Bethwyn Evans Doctor

Bethwyn Evans

Bethwyn Evans’s research is focused on language change and language contact, and the role that linguistics plays in understanding our non-linguistic past. She predominantly works on Austronesian and Papuan languages in Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. Beth collaborates with Simon Greenhill on exploring the links between micro- and macro-level processes of language evolution.

Recent Publications

  1. Maternal History of Oceania from Complete mtDNA Genomes: Contrasting Ancient Diversity with Recent Homogenization Due to the Austronesian Expansion

    Bibliography

    A Duggan, Bethwyn Evans, and F Friedlaender. 2014. "Maternal History of Oceania from Complete mtDNA Genomes: Contrasting Ancient Diversity with Recent Homogenization Due to the Austronesian Expansion." American Journal of Human Genetics. 94 (5): 721-733.

  2. The Routledge Handbook of Historical Linguistics

    Bibliography

    Claire Bowern, and Bethwyn Evans. 2015. The Routledge Handbook of Historical Linguistics. Abingdon, UK and New York, USA : Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.

  3. The Papuan languages of Island Melanesia

    Bibliography

    Stebbins, T, Evans, Bethwyn, and Terrill, A. 2017. "The Papuan languages of Island Melanesia". In The Languages and Linguistics of New Guinea: A Comprehensive Guide, 775-894. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

  4. Demographic correlates of language diversity

    Bibliography

    Greenhill, Simon, Bowern, Claire, and Evans, Bethwyn. 2015. "Demographic correlates of language diversity". In The Routledge Handbook of Historical Linguistics,

Nicholas Evans Distinguished Professor

Nicholas Evans

Nicholas (‘Nick’) Evans is the Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language. His central research focus is the diversity of human language and what this can tell us about the nature of language, culture, deep history, and the possibilities of the human mind. His 2010 book Dying Words: Endangered Languages and What They Have to Tell Us sets out a broad program for the field’s engagement with the planet’s dwindling linguistic diversity. Nick has carried out fieldwork on several languages of Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea, particularly Kayardild, Bininj Gun-wok, Dalabon, Ilgar, Iwaidja, Marrku and Nen, with published grammars of Kayardild (1995) and Bininj Gun-wok (2003), and dictionaries of Kayardild (1992) and Dalabon (2004). His ARC Laureate Project The Wellsprings of Linguistic Diversity examines how microvariation at speech community level relates to macro-diversity of languages and language families, and he is leading a team in a cross-linguistic study of how diverse grammars underpin social cognition.

Recent Publications

  1. URSULA MCCONNEL'S TIN TRUNK: A REMARKABLE RECOVERY.

    Bibliography

    P. Sutton. n.d.. "URSULA MCCONNEL'S TIN TRUNK: A REMARKABLE RECOVERY.." TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 134: 101 - 114.

  2. The languages of Southern New Guinea

    Bibliography

    Evans, Nicholas, Arka, Wayan, Carroll, Matthew, Dohler, Christian, Kashima, Eri, Mittag, Emil, Gast, Volker, Schokkin, Dineke, Quinn, Kyla, Tama, Philip, Van Tongeren, Charlotte, Olson, Bruno, and Siegel, Jeff. 2017. "The languages of Southern New Guinea". In The Languages and Linguistics of New Guinea: A Comprehensive Guide, 641-774. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

  3. Ngurrahmalkwonawoniyan. Listening here.

    Bibliography

    Nicholas Evans. 2017. "Ngurrahmalkwonawoniyan. Listening here.." Humanities Australia. 8: 34-44.

  4. Did language evolve in multilingual settings?

    Bibliography

    Nicholas Evans. 2018. "Did language evolve in multilingual settings?." Biology and Philosophy. 32 (151): 1-29. doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10539-018-9609-3.

  5. Songs that keep ancestral languages alive: a Marrku songset from Western Arnhem Land

    Bibliography

    Brown, Reuben, and Evans, Nicholas. 2017. "Songs that keep ancestral languages alive: a Marrku songset from Western Arnhem Land". In Recirculating songs: revitalising the singing practices of Indigenous Australia, 275-288. Canberra: Asia-Pacific Linguistics.

Janet Fletcher Associate Professor

Janet Fletcher

Janet Fletcher is Professor of Phonetics in the School of Languages and Linguistics. She has held previous appointments at the University of Edinburgh, the Ohio State University, and Macquarie University. Her research interests include phonetic theory, laboratory phonology, prosodic phonology, articulatory and acoustic modelling of prosodic effects in various languages. She is currently working on phonetic variation, and prosody, and intonation in Indigenous Australian languages and has commenced projects on selected languages of Oceania. She is a member of the Research Unit for Indigenous Language in the School of Languages and Linguistics.

Recent Publications

  1. Australian English: Pronunciation and Transcription

    Bibliography

    Felicity Cox, and Janet Fletcher. 2017. Australian English: Pronunciation and Transcription. Port Melbourne, Victoria : Cambridge University Press.

  2. Leaders and Followers: Uptalk and speaker role in map tasks in New Zealand English and Australian English

    Bibliography

    Janet Fletcher, and Warren Fletcher. 2016. "Leaders and Followers: Uptalk and speaker role in map tasks in New Zealand English and Australian English." New Zealand English Journal. 29-30: 77-93.

  3. Can you t[æ]ll I’m from M[æ]lbourne? An overview of the DRESS and TRAP vowels before /l/ as a regional accent marker in Australian English

    Bibliography

    Deborah Loakes, John Hajek, and Janet Fletcher. 2017. "Can you t[æ]ll I’m from M[æ]lbourne? An overview of the DRESS and TRAP vowels before /l/ as a regional accent marker in Australian English." English Worldwide. 38 (1): 29-49. doi: 10.1075/eww.38.1.03loa.

  4. The role of closure duration in the perception of word-initial geminates in Kelantan Malay

    Bibliography

    Mohd Hilmi Hamzah, Janet Fletcher, and John Hajek. 2016. "The role of closure duration in the perception of word-initial geminates in Kelantan Malay". In Sixteenth Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 85-88. Sydney.

  5. Nasal aerodynamics and coarticulation in Bininj Kunwok: Smoothing Spline Analysis of Variance

    Bibliography

    Hywel Stoakes, Janet Fletcher, and Andrew Butcher. 2016. "Nasal aerodynamics and coarticulation in Bininj Kunwok: Smoothing Spline Analysis of Variance". In 16th Speech Science and Technology Conference, 113-116. Sydney.

Caroline Jones Associate Professor

Caroline Jones

Caroline Jones’ research is mainly focused on the sound system of Kriol varieties and its acquisition by children. She is also interested in ways of improving efficiency, and making research more accessible or participatory with new technology and is Deputy Leader of the CoEDL Future Technologies Thread. Caroline is currently collaborating with CoEDL CI Professor Gillian Wigglesworth on language acquisition by Aboriginal children (Learning), with CI Catherine Travis on the Sydney Speaks project on variation and change in Australian English (Evolution), and with Felicity Meakins, Eva Schultze-Berndt, Candide Simard, Jessica Mathie and Patrick McConvell on the Ngarinyman Dictionary Project (Shape). Caroline Jones is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow.

Recent Publications

  1. Bilingualism, language shift and the corresponding expansion of spatial cognitive systems

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, Caroline Jones, and Cassandra Algy. 2016. "Bilingualism, language shift and the corresponding expansion of spatial cognitive systems." Language Sciences. 54: 1-13. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.langsci.2015.06.002.

  2. F4, a simple interface for efficient annotation

    Bibliography

    Caroline Jones, and Amit German. 2016. "F4, a simple interface for efficient annotation." Language Documentation & Conservation. 10: 347-355.

  3. Pre-service teachers’ knowledge of language concepts: relationships to field experiences

    Bibliography

    Caroline Jones, and Deborah Tetley. 2014. "Pre-service teachers’ knowledge of language concepts: relationships to field experiences." Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties. 19 (1): 17-32. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19404158.2014.891530.

Evan Kidd Associate Professor

Evan Kidd

Evan Kidd is an Associate Professor in the Research School of Psychology at the ANU and is a Senior Investigator at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. He completed his PhD in Psycholinguistics at La Trobe University, and has held academic positions at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, The University of Manchester, and La Trobe University. His research concentrates on language acquisition and language processing across different languages and in different populations.

Recent Publications

  1. Individual Differences in Infant Speech Segmentation: Achieving the Lexical Shift

    Bibliography

    Evan Kidd, Caroline Junge, Tara Spokes, Lauren Morrison, and Anne Cutler. "Individual Differences in Infant Speech Segmentation: Achieving the Lexical Shift." Infancy. doi: https://doi.org/10.1111/infa.12256.

  2. Symbolic play promotes non‐verbal communicative exchange in infant–caregiver dyads

    Bibliography

    Sara Quinn, and Evan Kidd. 2018. "Symbolic play promotes non‐verbal communicative exchange in infant–caregiver dyads." British Journal of Developmental Psychology. doi: doi:10.1111/bjdp.12251.

  3. The relationship between symbolic play and language acquisition: A meta-analytic review

    Bibliography

    Sara Quinn, Seamus Donnelly, and Evan Kidd. 2018. "The relationship between symbolic play and language acquisition: A meta-analytic review." Developmental Review.

  4. In press: The development of fast-mapping and novel word retention strategies in monolingual and bilingual infants

    Bibliography

    M Kalashnikova, Paola Escudero, and Evan Kidd. in press. "In press: The development of fast-mapping and novel word retention strategies in monolingual and bilingual infants." Developmental Science.

  5. Individual Differences in Language Acquisition and Processing

    Bibliography

    Evan Kidd, Seamus Donnelly, and Morten Christiansen. 2018. "Individual Differences in Language Acquisition and Processing." Trends in Cognitive Science. 22: 152-169. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2017.11.006.

Felicity Meakins Doctor

Felicity Meakins

Felicity Meakins specialises in the documentation of Australian languages in the Victoria River District in northern Australia and the effect of English on Indigenous languages. She has worked as a community linguist and academic, facilitating language revitalisation programs, consulting on Native Title claims and conducting research into Indigenous languages. This work has provided the basis for Case-Marking in Contact (Benjamins, 2011), Bilinarra, Gurindji and Malngin Plants and Animals (NT-LRM, 2012), Gurindji to English Dictionary (Batchelor Press, 2013), Bilinarra to English Dictionary (Batchelor Press, 2013), A Grammar of Bilinarra (with Rachel Nordlinger, Mouton, 2014), Kawarla: How to Make a Coolamon (Batchelor Press, 2015), Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages Since Colonisation (edited with Carmel O'Shannessy, Mouton, 2016) and Yijarni: True Stories from Gurindji Country (edited with Erika Charola, Aboriginal Studies Press, 2016).

Recent Publications

  1. Understanding linguistic fieldwork

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, Jennifer Green, and Myfany Turpin. 2018. Understanding linguistic fieldwork. Oxford : Routledge.

  2. The development of phonological stratification: Evidence from stop voicing perception in Gurindji Kriol and Roper Kriol

    Bibliography

    Jesse Stewart, Felicity Meakins, Cassandra Algy, and Angelina Joshua. 2018. "The development of phonological stratification: Evidence from stop voicing perception in Gurindji Kriol and Roper Kriol." Journal of Language Contact. 11 (1): 71-112. doi: doi:10.1163/19552629-01101003.

  3. Dis, That and Da Other: Variation in Aboriginal Children’s Article and Demonstrative Use at School

    Bibliography

    Fraser, Henry, Mushin, Ilana, Meakins, Felicity, and Gardner, Rod. 2018. "Dis, That and Da Other: Variation in Aboriginal Children’s Article and Demonstrative Use at School". In Language Practices of Indigenous Children and Youth: The Transition from Home to School, Palgrave Macmillan.

  4. Dis, that and da other: Variation in Aboriginal children's article and demonstrative use at school

    Bibliography

    Fraser, Henry, Mushin, Ilana, Meakins, Felicity, and Gardner, Rod. 2017. "Dis, that and da other: Variation in Aboriginal children's article and demonstrative use at school". In Language Practices of Indigenous Children: The Transition from Home to School, 237-269. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

  5. A replicable acoustic measure of lenition and the nature of variability in Gurindji stops

    Bibliography

    Tom Ennever, Felicity Meakins, and Erich Round. 2017. "A replicable acoustic measure of lenition and the nature of variability in Gurindji stops." Laboratory Phonology. 8 (1): 1-32. doi: https://doi.org/10.5334/labphon.18.

Rachel Nordlinger Professor

Rachel Nordlinger

Rachel Nordlinger is the Director of the Research Unit for Indigenous Language in the School of Languages and Linguistics. Rachel’s research centres around the description and documentation of Australia's indigenous languages, and she has worked with the Bilinarra, Wambaya, Gudanji, Murrinhpatha and Marri Ngarr communities to record and preserve their traditional languages. She has also published on syntactic and morphological theory, and in particular the challenges posed by the complex grammatical structures of Australian Aboriginal languages. She is the author of numerous academic articles in international journals, and five books, including A Grammar of Wambaya (Pacific Linguistics, 1998), Constructive Case: Evidence from Australian languages (CSLI Publications, 1998) and A Grammar of Bilinarra (Mouton de Gruyter, 2014, coauthored with Dr. Felicity Meakins). She is co-editor (with Harold Koch) of The Languages and Linguistics of Australia (Mouton de Gruyter, 2014).

Recent Publications

  1. The impact of national standardized literacy and numeracy testing on children and teaching staff in remote Australian Indigenous communities

    Bibliography

    Susy Macqueen, Ute Knoch, Gillian Wigglesworth, Rachel Nordlinger, Ruth Singer, Tim McNamara, and Rhianna Brickle. 2018. "The impact of national standardized literacy and numeracy testing on children and teaching staff in remote Australian Indigenous communities." Language Testing. doi: doi:10.1177/0265532218775758.

  2. The languages of the Daly River region (Northern Australia)

    Bibliography

    Nordlinger, Rachel. 2017. "The languages of the Daly River region (Northern Australia)". In The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis, 782-807. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  3. The acquisition of Murrinhpatha (Northern Australia)

    Bibliography

    Forshaw, William, Davidson, Lucy, Kelly, Barbara, Nordlinger, Rachel, Wigglesworth, Gillian, and Blythe, Joseph. 2017. "The acquisition of Murrinhpatha (Northern Australia)". In The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis, 473-494. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  4. Possessor dissension: agreement mismatch in Ngumpin-Yapa possessive constructions

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, and Rachel Nordlinger. 2017. "Possessor dissension: agreement mismatch in Ngumpin-Yapa possessive constructions." Linguistic Typology. 21 (1): 143-176.

  5. When magnets collide: digital preservation and access of at-risk audiovisual archives in a remote Aboriginal community

    Bibliography

    Array

Alan Rumsey Professor

Alan Rumsey

Alan Rumsey is a Professor of Anthropology in the School of Culture, History and Language, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU. His research fields are Highland New Guinea and Aboriginal Australia, with a focus on speech genres and relations among language, culture and intersubjectivity. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities, a past president of the Australian Anthropological Society and the co-convenor of the ANU Pacific Institute. He is currently involved in collaboration with CoEDL Affiliate Francesca Merlan on a major research project on ‘Children’s Language Learning and the Development of Intersubjectivity’, for which he was funded by an ARC Discovery Outstanding Researcher Award during 2013-16, and in collaboration with CoEDL Affiliate Lauren Reed on a study of a sign language in the Western Highlands of Papua New Guinea that is used in communication with deaf people.

Recent Publications

  1. The Sociocultural Dynamics of Indigenous Multilingualism in Northwestern Australia

    Bibliography

    Alan Rumsey. "The Sociocultural Dynamics of Indigenous Multilingualism in Northwestern Australia." Language and Communication. 1-11. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.langcom.2018.04.011.

  2. Dependency and relative determination in language acquisition: The case of Ku Waru

    Bibliography

    Rumsey, Alan. 2017. "Dependency and relative determination in language acquisition: The case of Ku Waru". In Dependencies in Language: On the Causal Ontology of Linguistic Systems, 97-114. Berlin: Language Science Press.

  3. Monologue and Dialogism in Highland New Guinea Verbal Art

    Bibliography

    Rumsey, Alan. 2017. "Monologue and Dialogism in Highland New Guinea Verbal Art". In The Monologic Imagination, 59-79. New York: Oxford University Press.

  4. Flexibles and polyvalance in Ku Waru: A development perspective

    Bibliography

    Merlan, Francesca, and Rumsey, Alan. 2017. "Flexibles and polyvalance in Ku Waru: A development perspective". In Lexical Polycategoriality: Cross-linguistic, Cross-theoretical and Language Acquisition Approaches, 307-341. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

  5. Mana, power and ‘pawa’ in the Pacific and beyond

    Bibliography

    Rumsey, Alan. 2016. "Mana, power and ‘pawa’ in the Pacific and beyond". In New Mana: Transformations of a Classic Concept in Pacific Languages and Cultures, Canberra: ANU Press.

Jane Simpson Professor

Jane Simpson

Jane Simpson has carried out fieldwork on Indigenous Australian languages since 1979, and is Chair of Indigenous Linguistics at the ANU. Jane has worked collaboratively on numerous Indigenous language resources: the Warlpiri dictionary with Affiliate Mary Laughren; Ngaanyatjarra speech register corpus with postdoctoral fellow Inge Kral, and Affiliates Jenny Green and Lizzy Ellis; a Warumungu dictionary and corpus with postdoctoral fellow Samantha Disbray; and with Affiliates Rob Amery and Maryanne Gale on a Ngarrindjeri text corpus. She is also working with CI Gillian Wigglesworth on the language learning experience of Indigenous school children. As Chair of the CoEDL Education Sub-committee, she helps draw together HDR training and other education initiatives, which include the University Languages Portal of Australia.

Recent Publications

  1. Going to School in a Different World

    Bibliography

    Wigglesworth, Gillian, and Simpson, Jane. 2018. "Going to School in a Different World". In Language Practices of Indigenous Children and Youth: The Transition from Home to School, Palgrave Macmillan.

  2. Language Practices of Indigenous Children and Youth: The Transition from Home to School

    Bibliography

    Gillian Wigglesworth, Jane Simpson, and Jill Vaughan. 2018. Language Practices of Indigenous Children and Youth: The Transition from Home to School. : Palgrave Macmillan.

  3. Working Verbs: The Spread of a Loan Word in Australian Language

    Bibliography

    Simpson, Jane. 2016. "Working Verbs: The Spread of a Loan Word in Australian Language". In Language, Land and Song: Studies in Honour of Luise Hercus, 244-62. London: EL Publishing.

  4. Language, Land and Song: Studies in Honour of Luise Hercus

    Bibliography

    Peter Austin, Harold Koch, and Jane Simpson. 2016. Language, Land and Song: Studies in Honour of Luise Hercus. London : EL Publishing.

  5. Daisy Bates in the digital world

    Bibliography

    Thieberger, Nick, Austin, Peter, Koch, Harold, and Simpson, Jane. 2016. "Daisy Bates in the digital world". In Language, land and song: Studies in honour of Luise Hercus, 102-114. London: EL Publishing.

Kim Sterelny Professor

Kim Sterelny

Kim Sterelny's main research interests are Philosophy of Biology, Philosophy of Psychology and Philosophy of Mind. He is the author of The Representational Theory of Mind and the co-author of Language and Reality (with Michael Devitt) and Sex and Death: An Introduction to Philosophy of Biology (with Paul Griffiths). He is Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. In addition to philosophy, Kim spends his time eating curries, drinking red wine, bushwalking and bird watching. Kim has been a Visiting Professor at Simon Fraser University in Canada, and at Cal Tech and the University of Maryland, College Park, in the USA.

Recent Publications

  1. From code to speaker meaning

    Bibliography

    Kim Sterelny. 2017. "From code to speaker meaning." Biology & Philosophy. 32 (6): 819-838.

  2. Farewell

    Bibliography

    Kim Sterelny. 2017. "Farewell." Biology & Philosophy. 32 (1): 1-3. doi: 10.1007/s10539-016-9559-6.

  3. Religion well explained? A response to commentaries on "Religion Re-explained"

    Bibliography

    Kim Sterelny. 2017. "Religion well explained? A response to commentaries on "Religion Re-explained"." Religion, Brain & Behavior. 1-20.

  4. The Perils and Promises of Cognitive Archaeology: An Introduction to the Thematic Issue

    Bibliography

    Kim Sterelny, and Peter Hiscock. 2017. "The Perils and Promises of Cognitive Archaeology: An Introduction to the Thematic Issue." Biological Theory. 12 (4): 189-194. doi: 10.1007/s13752-017-0282-6.

  5. Artifacts, Symbols, Thoughts

    Bibliography

    Kim Sterelny. 2017. "Artifacts, Symbols, Thoughts." Biological Theory. (THEMATIC ISSUE ARTICLE: SYMBOLS, SIGNALS, AND THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL RECORD II) doi: 10.1007/s13752-017-0277-3.

Nick Thieberger Associate Professor

Nick Thieberger

examples used in analytical claims. In 2003 he helped establish PARADISEC, a digital archive of recorded ethnographic material and is now its Director. He is a co-founder of the Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity (RNLD) and in 2008 he established a linguistic archive at the University of Hawai’i. He is interested in developments in digital humanities methods and their potential to improve research practice and he is now developing methods for creation of reusable data sets from fieldwork on previously unrecorded languages. He is the Editor of the journal Language Documentation & Conservation. He is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the University of Melbourne.

Recent Publications

  1. Tools and technology for language documentation

    Bibliography

    Rice, Keren, Thieberger, Nick, Campbell, Lyle, and Rehg, Ken. 2018. "Tools and technology for language documentation". In Oxford Handbook of Endangered Languages, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  2. Unlocking the archives

    Bibliography

    Linda Barwick, Nick Thieberger, Vera Ferreira, and Nick Ostler. 2018. "Unlocking the archives". In Communities in Control: Learning tools and strategies for multilingual endangered language communities. Proceedings of the 2017 XXI FEL conference., 135-139.

  3. Unable to say too much about kano in Nafsan (South Efate)

    Bibliography

    Thieberger, Nick. 2017. "Unable to say too much about kano in Nafsan (South Efate)". In Linguistic travels in time and space: Festschrift for Liz Pearce, 211-216. Wellington:

  4. Carl-Georg von Brandenstein's legacy: The past in the present

    Bibliography

    Thieberger, Nick. 2017. "Carl-Georg von Brandenstein's legacy: The past in the present". In The German Language Tradition of Ethnography in Australia, 435-451. Canberra: ANU Press.

  5. Missionary-induced language change, on the trail of the conditional in Nafsan, central Vanuatu

    Bibliography

    Nick Thieberger. 2017. "Missionary-induced language change, on the trail of the conditional in Nafsan, central Vanuatu." History and Philosophy of the Language Sciences.

Catherine Travis Professor

Catherine Travis

Catherine Travis is Professor of Modern European Languages in the School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics at the ANU. Her work addresses questions related to language evolution at a micro level; she applies quantitative methods to probe the impact of linguistic and social factors on language variation and change in the speech community. In the Centre of Excellence, she leads the Sydney Speaks project, a sociolinguistic study of Australian English, examining the speech of Sydney-siders of diverse social backgrounds, recorded at different times, and born over a 100-year period (from the 1890s to the 1990s). A second project, in collaboration with PI Rena Torres Cacoullos (Penn State University), examines outcomes of language contact in a long-standing Spanish-English bilingual community in New Mexico, USA. A co-authored book deriving from this work, Bilingualism in the Community: Code-switching and Grammars in Contact, has been published by Cambridge University Press.

Recent Publications

  1. Bilingualism in the Community: Code-switching and Grammars in Contact

    Bibliography

    Rena Torres Cacoullos, and Catherine Travis. 2018. Bilingualism in the Community: Code-switching and Grammars in Contact. Cambridge : Cambridge.

  2. Gauging convergence on the ground: code-switching in the community

    Bibliography

    Catherine Travis, and Rena Torres Cacoullos. August, 2015. "Gauging convergence on the ground: code-switching in the community." International Journal of Bilingualism (Guest editors - Special Issue). 19 (4): 365-480. doi: 10.1177/1367006913516042.

  3. Cross-language priming: A view from bilingual speech

    Bibliography

    Catherine Travis, Rena Torres Cacoullos, and Kidd Evan. March, 2017. "Cross-language priming: A view from bilingual speech." Bilingualism: Language and Cognition. 20 (2 Special issue edited by Gerrit Jan Kootstra and Pieter Muysken): 283-298. doi: 10.1017/S1366728915000127.

  4. Different registers, different grammars? Subject expression in English conversation and narrative

    Bibliography

    Catherine Travis, and Amy Lindstrom. March, 2016. "Different registers, different grammars? Subject expression in English conversation and narrative." Language Variation and Change. 28 (1): 103-128. doi: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954394515000174.

  5. Two languages, one effect: Structural priming in code-switching

    Bibliography

    Rena Torres Cacoullos, and Catherine Travis. August, 2016. "Two languages, one effect: Structural priming in code-switching." Bilingualism: Language and Cognition. 19 (4): 733-753. doi: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1366728914000406.

Gillian Wigglesworth Professor

Gillian Wigglesworth

Gillian Wigglesworth’s expertise is in first and second language acquisition in monolingual, bilingual and multilingual settings. A major focus of her work is in remote Indigenous communities documenting children’s language learning at home and at school, together with CI Jane Simpson (Shape). She is collaborating with other Learning program members to ensure comparable data collection patterns in the acquisition projects taking place in Australia and Papua New Guinea. Her collaboration with CI Janet Wiles (Evolution) investigates the potential of using robots in remote communities for language development, and with Professor Katherine Demuth (Macquarie University, CI, Centre in Cognition and its Disorders) on assessing Indigenous children’s hearing to determine any relationship to phonological awareness development. She is a Deputy Director of the Research Unit for Indigenous Language and Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor at the University of Melbourne.

Recent Publications

  1. The impact of national standardized literacy and numeracy testing on children and teaching staff in remote Australian Indigenous communities

    Bibliography

    Susy Macqueen, Ute Knoch, Gillian Wigglesworth, Rachel Nordlinger, Ruth Singer, Tim McNamara, and Rhianna Brickle. 2018. "The impact of national standardized literacy and numeracy testing on children and teaching staff in remote Australian Indigenous communities." Language Testing. doi: doi:10.1177/0265532218775758.

  2. Code-Switching or Code-Mixing? Tiwi Children’s Use of Language Resources in a Multilingual Environment

    Bibliography

    Wilson, Aidan, Hurst, Peter, and Wigglesworth, Gillian. 2018. "Code-Switching or Code-Mixing? Tiwi Children’s Use of Language Resources in a Multilingual Environment". In Language Practices of Indigenous Children and Youth: The Transition from Home to School, Palgrave Macmillan.

  3. Going to School in a Different World

    Bibliography

    Wigglesworth, Gillian, and Simpson, Jane. 2018. "Going to School in a Different World". In Language Practices of Indigenous Children and Youth: The Transition from Home to School, Palgrave Macmillan.

  4. Language Practices of Indigenous Children and Youth: The Transition from Home to School

    Bibliography

    Gillian Wigglesworth, Jane Simpson, and Jill Vaughan. 2018. Language Practices of Indigenous Children and Youth: The Transition from Home to School. : Palgrave Macmillan.

  5. The acquisition of Murrinhpatha (Northern Australia)

    Bibliography

    Forshaw, William, Davidson, Lucy, Kelly, Barbara, Nordlinger, Rachel, Wigglesworth, Gillian, and Blythe, Joseph. 2017. "The acquisition of Murrinhpatha (Northern Australia)". In The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis, 473-494. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Janet Wiles Professor

Janet Wiles

Janet Wiles’ research involves bio-inspired computation in complex systems, with applications in cognitive science and biorobotics. She completed a PhD in Computer Science at the University of Sydney, a postdoctoral fellowship in Psychology at the University of Queensland, and served as faculty in the Cognitive Science program for 12 years. In 2003 she formed the Complex and Intelligent Systems research group at the University of Queensland where she has been Professor since 2006. She currently coordinates the UQ node of CoEDL, where her research focuses on social robots and language.

Recent Publications

  1. Hello harlie: Enabling speech monitoring through chat-bot conversations

    Bibliography

    David Ireland, Christina Atay, Jacki Liddle, Dana Bradford, Helen Lee, Olivia Rushin, Thomas Mullins, Daniel Angus, Janet Wiles, Simon McBride, and Adam Vogel. 2016. "Hello harlie: Enabling speech monitoring through chat-bot conversations". In Digital Health Innovation for Consumers, Clinicians, Connectivity and Community - Selected Papers from the 24th Australian National Health Informatics Conference, HIC 2016, 55-60. Melbourne, Australia.

  2. Figurative frames: a critical vocabulary for images in information visualization

    Bibliography

    Lydia Byrne, Daniel Angus, and Janet Wiles. 2017. "Figurative frames: a critical vocabulary for images in information visualization." Information Visualization. doi: doi:10.1177/1473871617724212.

  3. Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction

    Bibliography

    Scott Heath, Gautier Durantin, Marie Boden, Kristyn Hensby, Jonathan Taufatofua, Ola Olsson, Paul Pounds, Jason Weigel, and Janet Wiles. 2017. "Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction." Frontiers in Robotics and AI. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/frobt.2017.00027.

  4. Social Moments: A Perspective on Interaction for Social Robotics

    Bibliography

    Gautier Durantin, Scott Heath, and Janet Wiles. 2017. "Social Moments: A Perspective on Interaction for Social Robotics." Frontiers in Robotics and AI. (4): 24. doi: doi: 10.3389/frobt.2017.00024.

  5. Using Visual Text Analytics to Examine Broadcast Interviewing

    Bibliography

    Daniel Angus, Richard Fitzgerald, Christina Atay, and Janet Wiles. 2016. "Using Visual Text Analytics to Examine Broadcast Interviewing." Discourse, Contact & Media. 11: 38-49.. doi: 10.1016/j.dcm.2015.11.002.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University

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