Associate Investigators

I Wayan Arka Associate Professor

I Wayan Arka

Wayan Arka is interested in Austronesian and Papuan languages of Eastern Indonesia, language typology, syntactic theory and language documentation. His current project on the typological study of core arguments and marking in Austronesian languages is an extension of my previous collaborative project with Indonesian linguists on the languages of Eastern Indonesia. He is still working on the Rongga materials collected for The Rongga Documentation Project, funded by the Hans Rausing ELDP grant (2004-6). He is also currently doing collaborative research on voice in the Austronesian languages of eastern Indonesia (funded by an NSF grant, 2006-2009), Indonesian Parallel Grammar Project (funded by a near-miss grant from Sydney University (2007) and an ARC Discovery grant (2008-2011), and the languages of Southern New Guinea (funded by an ARC grant 2011-2015).

Brett Baker Doctor

Brett Baker

Brett Baker is a senior lecturer in linguistics, the author of Word Structure in Ngalakgan (2008), and the co-editor (with Ilana Mushin) of Discourse and Grammar in Australian Languages (2008).

Recent Publications

  1. Native prosodic systems and learning experience shape production of non-native tones

    Bibliography

    Mengyue Wu, Janet Fletcher, Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen, and Brett Baker. 2016. "Native prosodic systems and learning experience shape production of non-native tones". In Proceedings of Speech Prosody 2016, 587-591. Boston, USA.

  2. Voicing perception in the absence of voicing contrast

    Bibliography

    Brett Baker, and Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen. 2015. "Voicing perception in the absence of voicing contrast". In 16th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association,

  3. The Vowel inventory of Roper Kriol

    Bibliography

    Brett Baker, and Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen. 2015. "The Vowel inventory of Roper Kriol". In Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences,

  4. Perception of Cantonese tones by Mandarin speakers

    Bibliography

    Janet Fletcher, Mengyue Wu, Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen, Brett Baker, and Catherine Best. 2015. "Perception of Cantonese tones by Mandarin speakers". In Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences,

  5. Wubuy coronal stop perception by speakers of three dialects of Bangla

    Bibliography

    Janet Fletcher, Brett Baker, Olga Maxwell, and Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen. 2015. "Wubuy coronal stop perception by speakers of three dialects of Bangla". In Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences,

Steven Bird Associate Professor

Steven Bird

Steven Bird is Associate Professor in Computing and Information Systems at the University of Melbourne, and Senior Research Associate at the Linguistic Data Consortium. His research focuses on formal and computational models for linguistic information, with application to human language technologies and to the description of the world's 7,000 languages. Before coming to Melbourne University he did doctoral and post-doctoral research at the University of Edinburgh (1987-94). From 1995-97 he conducted linguistic fieldwork on the languages of western Cameroon, published a dictionary, and helped develop several new writing systems. From 1998-2002 he was Associate Director of the Linguistic Data Consortium at the University of Pennsylvania, where he led an R&D team working on open-source software for linguistic annotation.

Recent Publications

  1. Natural language processing with Python

    Bibliography

    Steven Bird, Edward Loper, and Ewan Klein. 2009. Natural language processing with Python. Sebatopol, CA : O’Reilly Media Inc.

David Bradley Professor

David Bradley

David Bradley has conducted extensive research on endangered languages, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, geolinguistics, language policy and phonetics/phonology in Southeast, East and South Asia over many years, especially on Tibeto-Burman languages, as well as on other languages of these areas and on varieties of English. He is a member of the editorial boards of eight international journals and monograph series, the author, co-author, editor or co-editor of over twenty books and five language atlases, several with translation and/or second and third editions; and of numerous other publications.

Recent Publications

  1. Language reclamation strategies: Some Tibeto-Burman examples

    Bibliography

    David Bradley. 2015. "Language reclamation strategies: Some Tibeto-Burman examples." Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area. 38 (2): 3-21.

  2. Chinese calendar animals in Shanhaijng and in Sino-Tibetan languages

    Bibliography

    Bradley, David, Bradley, David, and Likun, Pei. 2015. "Chinese calendar animals in Shanhaijng and in Sino-Tibetan languages". In World Geographical Philosophy of Shanhaijing and Chinese Traditional Culture,, 93-101. Beijing: Beijing Foreign Studies University Press.

  3. Lisu

    Bibliography

    Bradley, David, and Sybesma, Rint. 2015. "Lisu". In Encyclopedia of Chinese Language and Linguistics., Leiden: Brill.

  4. Vitality of languages in China

    Bibliography

    Bradley, David, and Sybesma, Rint. 2015. "Vitality of languages in China". In Encyclopedia of Chinese Language and Linguistics., Leiden: Brill.

  5. Languages and language families in China

    Bibliography

    Bradley, David, and Sybesma, Rint. 2015. "Languages and language families in China". In Encyclopedia of Chinese Language and Linguistics., Leiden: Brill.

Denis Burnham Professor

Denis Burnham

Denis Burnham is the inaugural Director of MARCS at the Western Sydney University. His current research focuses on experiential and inherited influences in speech and language development: infant speech perception; auditory-visual (AV) speech perception; special speech registers, including ,infant-, pet-, foreigner-, computer-, and lover-directed speech; captions for the hearing impaired; tone languages: lexical tone perception, tone perception with cochlear implants, and speech-music interactions; human-machine interaction; speech corpus studies; and the role of infants’ perceptual experience and expertise, in literacy development.

Recent Publications

  1. Mature neural responses to infant-directed speech but not adult-directed speech in pre-verbal infants

    Bibliography

    Peter Varghese, Marina Kalashnikova, Aimee Santos, and Denis Burnham. 2016. "Mature neural responses to infant-directed speech but not adult-directed speech in pre-verbal infants." Scientific Reports. 6: doi: doi:10.1038/srep34273.

  2. Child readers’ eye movements in reading Thai, Vision Research

    Bibliography

    Benjawan Kasisopa, Ronan Reilly, Sudaporn Luksaneeyanawin, and Denis Burnham. "Child readers’ eye movements in reading Thai, Vision Research." Vision Research. 123: 8-19. doi: 10.1016/j.visres.2015.07.009.

  3. Neural processing of amplitude and formant rise time in dyslexia

    Bibliography

    Peter Varghese, Marina Kalashnikova, and Denis Burnham. June 2016. "Neural processing of amplitude and formant rise time in dyslexia." Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience. 19: 152-163.

  4. Kalashnikova, M., Schwarz, I. -C., & Burnham, D. K. (2016). OZI : Australian English communicative development inventory. First Language, 36(4), 407-427. doi:

    Bibliography

    Marina Kalashnikova, Iris-Corinna Schwarz, and Denis Burnham. 2016. "Kalashnikova, M., Schwarz, I. -C., & Burnham, D. K. (2016). OZI : Australian English communicative development inventory. First Language, 36(4), 407-427. doi:." First Language. 36 (4): 407-427. doi: doi:10.1177/0142723716648846.

  5. The time course for processing vowels and lexical tones : reading aloud Thai words

    Bibliography

    Chris Davis, Colin Schoknecht, Jeesun Kim, and Denis Burnham. 2016. "The time course for processing vowels and lexical tones : reading aloud Thai words." Language and Speech. 59 (2): 196-218. doi: doi:10.1177/0023830915586033.

Michael Christie Professor

Michael Christie

Michael Christie heads up the Contemporary Indigenous Governance and Knowledge Systems research theme at the Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University. Professor Christie worked in Yolŋu communities as a teacher linguist in the 1970s and 1980s, and started the Yolŋu Studies program at Northern Territory University (now CDU) in 1994. After working within the Faculty of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies and the School of Education, he moved to the Northern Institute in 2010. He has over 40 years involvement with bilingual education, linguistics and literature production in the NT, and the ways in which Aboriginal philosophies and pedagogies have influenced the production and use of literature over the years. He is a major contributor to the Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages.

Nick Enfield Professor

Nick Enfield

  • Title: Professor
  • Program: Shape/Evolution
  • Institution: The University of Sydney

Nick Enfield’s research addresses the intersection of language, cognition, social interaction, and culture, from three main angles: 1. Semiotic structure and process; 2. Causal dependencies in semiotic systems; 3. Language and Human Sociality. His empirical specialisation is in the languages of mainland Southeast Asia, especially Lao and Kri. Lao is the national language of Laos, spoken by over 20 million people in Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and elsewhere. Kri (Vietic sub-branch of Austroasiatic) is spoken near the Laos-Vietnam border in Khammouane Province by an isolated community of around 300 people.

Simon Garrod Professor

Simon Garrod

Simon Garrod holds the Chair in Cognitive Psychology and is director of the INP Social Interactions Centre. His interests in psycholinguistics include reading, dialogue, and the evolution of language and communication. He was awarded the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the Society for Text and Discourse and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

Simon Greenhill Doctor

Simon Greenhill

Simon Greenhill's research focus is the evolution of languages and cultures. He has applied cutting-edge computational phylogenetic methods to language and cultural evolution, and used these methods to test hypotheses about human prehistory and cultural evolution in general. The questions he has explored so far include how people settled the Pacific, how language structure and complexity evolve, the co-evolution of cultural systems in the Pacific, and how cultural evolution can be modelled.

Recent Publications

  1. Overview: Debating the effect of environment on language

    Bibliography

    Simon Greenhill. February 22, 2016. "Overview: Debating the effect of environment on language." Journal of Language Evolution. 1 (1): 30-32. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jole/lzv007.

  2. A Combined Comparative and Phylogenetic Analysis of the Chapacuran Language Family

    Bibliography

    Joshua Birchall, Michael Dunn, and Simon Greenhill. July 2016. "A Combined Comparative and Phylogenetic Analysis of the Chapacuran Language Family." International Journal of American Linguistics. 82 (3): 255-284. doi: DOI: 10.1086/687383.

  3. D-PLACE: A Global Database of Cultural, Linguistic and Environmental Diversity

    Bibliography

    Simon Greenhill, Russell Gray, Kathryn Kirby, Fiona Jordan, Stephanie Gomes-Ng, and Hans-Jorg Bibiko. April 11, 2016. "D-PLACE: A Global Database of Cultural, Linguistic and Environmental Diversity." PLoS ONE.

  4. Cultural and Environmental Predictors of Pre-European Deforestation on Pacific Islands

    Bibliography

    Simon Greenhill, Quentin Atkinson, Ties Coomber, Sam Passmore, and Geoff Kushnick. May 27, 2016. "Cultural and Environmental Predictors of Pre-European Deforestation on Pacific Islands." PLoS ONE. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0156340.

  5. Links between language diversity and species richness can be confounded by spatial autocorrelation

    Bibliography

    Simon Greenhill, Lindell Bromham, and Marcel Cardillo. 2015. "Links between language diversity and species richness can be confounded by spatial autocorrelation". In Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B,

Nikolaus Himmelmann Professor

Nikolaus Himmelmann

Nikolaus Himmelmann has done fieldwork in the Philippines (Tagalog), Sulawesi (Tomin-Tolitoli languages) and East Timor (Waima’a) and published widely on a number of core issues in Austronesian grammar, including the nature of lexical and syntactic categories and voice.

Recent Publications

  1. Obituary. A life of polysynthesis: Hans-Jürgen Sasse (1943-2015)

    Bibliography

    Nicholas Evans, Nikolaus Himmelmann, and Matić, Dejan. 2015. "Obituary. A life of polysynthesis: Hans-Jürgen Sasse (1943-2015)." Linguistic Typology. 19 (2): 327-335.

Paul Maruff Professor

Paul Maruff

  • Title: Professor
  • Program: Processing/Technologies
  • Institution: Cogstate

Paul Maruff is one of the founders of Cogstate. He is a neuropsychologist with expertise in the identification and measurement of subtle behavioral and cognitive dysfunction. Paul's research integrates conventional and computerized neuropsychological testing with cognitive neuroscientific methods to guide decision making in drug development and in clinical medicine.

Recent Publications

  1. Monitoring change requires a rethink of assessment practices in voice and speech

    Bibliography

    Adam Vogel, and Paul Maruff. 07/2014. "Monitoring change requires a rethink of assessment practices in voice and speech." Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology. 39 (2): 56-61. doi: 10.3109/14015439.2013.775332.

Francesca Merlan Professor

Francesca Merlan

Francesca Merlan's research interests include: social transformation; indigeneity, nationalism, language and culture; theories of social action, organisation, and consciousness; modernity segmentary politics; exchange emergent identities; gender, social and cultural transformation in North Australia; the transformation of place-worlds among Aboriginal people; the building of Australian national identity in relation to indigeneity; land claims; applied anthropology; and sites and heritage issues. Her research covers many geographies and nationalities, including Australia; Papua New Guinea; and North America, particularly American Indian communities and surrounding (rural) communities and towns.

Recent Publications

  1. Language ecology, language policy and pedagogical practice in a Papua New Guinea highland community

    Bibliography

    Francesca Merlan, and Alan Rumsey. 2015. "Language ecology, language policy and pedagogical practice in a Papua New Guinea highland community." Journal of the Linguistic Society of Papua New Guinea. 33 (1): 82-96.

Ilana Mushin Doctor

Ilana Mushin

Ilana Mushin has a long-standing interest in the management of knowledge in discourse. Her recent research has included epistemic stance-taking in Australian Aboriginal communities; grammatical description of Garrwa, a critically endangered Aboriginal language; and, more recently, on the English-based vernacular languages spoken by most Aboriginal people in Australia today.. She is the author of Evidentiality and Epistemological Stance: Narrative Retelling (John Benjamins, 2001) and A Grammar of (Western) Garrwa (Mouton De Gruyter, 2012) and co-editor of Discourse and Grammar in Australian Languages (with Brett Baker, John Benjamins, 2008).

Recent Publications

  1. Rethinking Australian Indigenous English-based speech varieties: Evidence from Woorabinda

    Bibliography

    Jennifer Munro, and Ilana Mushin. "Rethinking Australian Indigenous English-based speech varieties: Evidence from Woorabinda." Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages. 31 (1): 82/112. doi: 10.1075/jpcl.31.1.

  2. Same but different: Understanding language contact in Queensland Indigenous Settlements

    Bibliography

    Mushin, Ilana, Angelo, Denise, and Munro, Jennifer. 2016. "Same but different: Understanding language contact in Queensland Indigenous Settlements". In Land and language in the Cape York Peninsula and Gulf Country, 383-408. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

  3. Identifying the grammars of Queensland ex-Government reserves: The case of Woorie Talk

    Bibliography

    Mushin, Ilana, and Watts, Janet. 2016. "Identifying the grammars of Queensland ex-Government reserves: The case of Woorie Talk". In Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages since Colonisation, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

  4. Establishing connections: a tale of two communities

    Bibliography

    Mushin, Ilana, and Gardner, Rod. 2016. "Establishing connections: a tale of two communities". In Doing research in communities, Routledge.

  5. The impact of Interaction and language on leading learning in Indigenous Classrooms

    Bibliography

    Mushin, Ilana, and Gardner, Rod. 2016. "The impact of Interaction and language on leading learning in Indigenous Classrooms". In Leadership for learning and effective change, Springer.

Carmel O’Shannessy Professor

Carmel O’Shannessy

Carmel O'Shannessy is currently documenting a newly emerged mixed language in northern Australia, Light Warlpiri, the emergence of which is the result of code-switching between an Australian language, Warlpiri, and English and Kriol (an English-lexified creole). Her current projects include diachronic changes in nominal case-marking from Warlpiri to Light Warlpiri, and grammaticalisation and innovation in the Light Warlpiri auxiliary system. Of particular interest is the role of children in grammaticalisation processes.

Recent Publications

  1. Special Issue: Indigenous children’s language: Acquisition, preservation and evolution of language in minority contexts

    Bibliography

    Barbara F. Kelly, Evan Kidd, Gillian Wigglesworth, William Forshaw, Rachel Nordlinger, Carmel O’Shannessy, Mylène Lebon-Eyquem, Paul Vogt, J. Douglas Mastin, Diede MA Schots, and . 2015. "Special Issue: Indigenous children’s language: Acquisition, preservation and evolution of language in minority contexts." First Language. 35: 279–285.

Luc Steels Professor

Luc Steels

Luc Steels studied linguistics at the University of Antwerp (Belgium) and computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA). His main research field is Artificial Intelligence covering a wide range of intelligent abilities, including vision, robotic behavior, conceptual representations and language. He founded the Sony Computer Science Laboratory in Paris in 1996 and became its first director. Currently he is ICREA research professor at the Institute for Evolutionary Biology (CSIC,UPF). During the past decade he has focused on theories for the origins and evolution of language using computer simulations and robotic experiments to discover and test them.

Adam Vogel Doctor

Adam Vogel

Adam leads the Speech Neuroscience Unit at the University of Melbourne where his team work towards improving speech, language and swallowing function in people with progressive and acquired neurological conditions. Adam’s group pursues rehabilitation and discovery research across two intertwined domains: (1) the first seeks to improve communication and swallowing in people with progressive neurological disorders (e.g., atypical dementia, hereditary ataxias); (2) the second exploits speech as a sensitive marker of central nervous system integrity to better understand the mechanisms underlying a range of neurological conditions (e.g., sleep disturbance, drug use, hearing impairment, depression).

Recent Publications

  1. Hello Harlie: Enabling Speech Monitoring Through Chat-Bot Conversations

    Bibliography

    David Ireland, Christina Atay, Jacki Liddle, Dana Bradford, Helen Lee, Olivia Rushin, Thomas Mullins, Daniel Angus, Janet Wiles, Simon McBride, and Adam Vogel. 2016. "Hello Harlie: Enabling Speech Monitoring Through Chat-Bot Conversations." Studies in Health Technology and Informatics.. 227: 55. doi: 10.3233/978-1-61499-666-8-55.

  2. Can a smartphone-based chatbot engage older community group members? The impact of specialised content

    Bibliography

    Christina Atay, David Ireland, Jacki Liddle, Janet Wiles, Adam Vogel, Daniel Angus, Dana Bradford, Alana Campbell, Olivia Rushin, and Helen Chenery. July 1, 2016. "Can a smartphone-based chatbot engage older community group members? The impact of specialised content." Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. 12 (7): 1005-1006.

  3. Monitoring change requires a rethink of assessment practices in voice and speech

    Bibliography

    Adam Vogel, and Paul Maruff. 07/2014. "Monitoring change requires a rethink of assessment practices in voice and speech." Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology. 39 (2): 56-61. doi: 10.3109/14015439.2013.775332.

Brendan Weekes Professor

Brendan Weekes

Brendan Weekes is an experimental psychologist who studies the psychology of language and memory – specifically word recognition and recall. He examines cognitive processes using cross-linguistic, neuropsychological and brain imaging methods. His research can be applied to understanding problems in clinical neuropsychology including bilingual aphasia, dementia and reading difficulties. He is Chair in Communication Science at the University of Hong Kong and Director of the Communication Science Laboratory at HKU, where he has been since 2010. Prior 2010, he was a Reader in Experimental Psychology at the University of Sussex for ten years.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University

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