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Heather Kember to present on "Twisting the tongue to understand the mind: The representation of segments and tones in Mandarin Chinese"

Processing, Western Sydney University

Date: 25 April 2015

When: 4pm, 25 May 2015

Where: Building 3, Seminar Room 3.G.55, UWS Bankstown campus

Historically, models of connected speech have focused on a single level of representation from a select few languages, limiting generalization across other languages. Here I will present tongue twister studies that examine speech production processes in Mandarin Chinese.

Results suggest that segments and tones should be represented differently in models of speech production, in line with the O’Seaghdha, Chen and Chen (2010) model of word form encoding that proposes lexical tone be represented as part of a metrical frame, and separate to segments.

This model is in contrast to the gestural
account of lexical tone proposed by Gao (2008), who argued that segments and tones are similar structures. The findings also suggest that the representations of segments are similar
in both Chinese and English, consistent with the predictions of the coupled oscillator model
of speech production (Goldstein, et al., 2007).

These results highlight the need for cross-linguistic research and work that spans more than one level of representation within the speech production system.

Read more

Historically, models of connected speech have focused on a single level of representation from a select few languages, limiting generalization across other languages. Here I will present tongue twister studies that examine speech production processes in Mandarin Chinese.

Results suggest that segments and tones should be represented differently in models of speech production, in line with the O’Seaghdha, Chen and Chen (2010) model of word form encoding that proposes lexical tone be represented as part of a metrical frame, and separate to segments.

This model is in contrast to the gestural
account of lexical tone proposed by Gao (2008), who argued that segments and tones are similar structures. The findings also suggest that the representations of segments are similar
in both Chinese and English, consistent with the predictions of the coupled oscillator model
of speech production (Goldstein, et al., 2007).

These results highlight the need for cross-linguistic research and work that spans more than one level of representation within the speech production system.

- See more at: http://marcs.uws.edu.au/MERC_kember_may25#sthash.Fnok2nzm.dpuf
  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
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  • Western Sydney University