Plenary Speakers

Anita Auer

Anita Auer

  • Institution: University of Lausanne

Abstract: Urbanisation, supralocalization and the emergence of Standard English

Anita Auer is Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland, and has published widely in the fields of language variation and change, language standardisation and corpus linguistics and she has a keen interest in interdisciplinary research, notably the correlation between language variation and change, socio-economic history and textual history. Anita is co-editor of the Journal of Historical Sociolinguistics (De Gruyter). In recent years, she has co-edited a number of books and special issues as for instance the volume Letter Writing and Language Change (Cambridge University Press, 2015) with Daniel Schreier (Zurich) and Richard J. Watts (Prof. Em., Berne), the volume Linguistics and Literary History. In Honour of Sylvia Adamson (John Benjamins, 2016) with Victorina González-Díaz, Jane Hodson and Violeta Sotirova, the volume Exploring Future Paths for Historical Sociolinguistics (John Benjamins, 2017) with Tanja Säily (Helsinki), Arja Nurmi (Tampere), Minna Palander-Collin (Helsinki), as well as a special issue of the International Journal of Bilingualism on ‘Heritage-Language Speakers: Theoretical and Empirical Challenges on Sociolinguistic Attitudes and Prestige’ (2018) with Jonathan Kasstan (Queen Mary, London) and Joe Salmons (Wisconsin, Madison)

Chris Ballard

Chris Ballard

Abstract: Historical contexts for language transformation in Melanesia

Chris Ballard is a Pacific historian at the Australian National University. He has worked for more than thirty years as an archaeologist, historian and anthropologist in Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and eastern Indonesia, and recently completed teaching for two years at the University of French Polynesia. His present work focuses on Deep History, indigenous historicity, heritage transmission and disasters.

Nick Evans

Nick Evans

  • Institution: Australian National University

Nicholas (Nick) Evans is Laureate Fellow and Distinguished Professor of Linguistics at the Australian National University, directs the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language (CoEDL). He has carried out wide-ranging fieldwork on indigenous languages of Australia and Papua New Guinea. More broadly, his driving interests are the interplay between the incredible diversity contained in the world’s endangered languages and the many scientific and humanistic questions they can help us answer, such as the close interweaving of language and culture. He has also worked as a linguist, interpreter and anthropologist in two Native Title claims, as a promotor and interpreter of Aboriginal art, and as a translator of Aboriginal oral literature.

Mattis List

Abstract: Open problems in computational historical linguistics
The handout for Mattis' talk is here

Johann-Mattis List is senior scientist at the Department of Linguistics and Cultural Evolution of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History where he pursues an interdisciplinary research project on Computer-Assisted Language Comparison (CALC), funded by the European Research Council (April 2017 – March 2022). In this project, he develops methods and interfaces that bridge the gap between computational and classical approaches to historical linguistics in order to shed light on the history of the Sino-Tibetan language family. In his research, he generally follows a data-driven, empirical, and quantitative perspective on language change and language history. In contrast to pure computational approaches, however, he tries to keep his research closely connected to traditional historical linguistics and theory, following a computer-assisted rather than a computer-based framework of quantitative research in historical linguistics.

Felicity Meakins

Felicity Meakins

Abstract: Language diversification through the lens of rapid intergenerational change

Felicity Meakins specialises in the documentation of Australian languages in the Victoria River District in northern Australia and the effect of English on Indigenous languages. She has worked as a community linguist and academic, facilitating language revitalisation programs, consulting on Native Title claims and conducting research into Indigenous languages. This work has provided the basis for Case-Marking in Contact (Benjamins, 2011), Bilinarra, Gurindji and Malngin Plants and Animals (NT-LRM, 2012), Gurindji to English Dictionary (Batchelor Press, 2013), Bilinarra to English Dictionary (Batchelor Press, 2013), A Grammar of Bilinarra (with Rachel Nordlinger, Mouton, 2014), Kawarla: How to Make a Coolamon (Batchelor Press, 2015), Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages Since Colonisation (edited with Carmel O'Shannessy, Mouton, 2016) and Yijarni: True Stories from Gurindji Country (edited with Erika Charola, Aboriginal Studies Press, 2016).

Recent Publications

  1. The birth of a new language does not favour simplification

    Bibliography

    Felicity Meakins, Xia Hua, Cassandra Algy, and Lindell Bromham. 2019. "The birth of a new language does not favour simplification." Language. 95 (2): 294-332.

  2. Karu: Growing Up Gurindji

    Bibliography

    Violet Wadrill, Biddy Wavehill, Topsy Dodd, and Felicity Meakins. 2019. Karu: Growing Up Gurindji. Melbourne : Spinifex Press.

  3. Prominent possessor indexing in Gurindji

    Bibliography

    Bond, Oliver, Meakins, Felicity, and Nordlinger, Rachel. 2019. "Prominent possessor indexing in Gurindji". In Prominent internal possessors, 80-106. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  4. Songs from the Stations: Wajarra as sung by Ronnie Wavehill Wirrpa, Dandy Danbayarri, Topsy Dodd Ngarnjal

    Bibliography

    Myfanwy Turpin, and Felicity Meakins. 2018. Songs from the Stations: Wajarra as sung by Ronnie Wavehill Wirrpa, Dandy Danbayarri, Topsy Dodd Ngarnjal. Sydney : Sydney University Press.

  5. Jingulu and Mudburra plants and animals: Biocultural knowledge of the Jingili and Mudburra people of Murranji, Marlinja, Warranganku (Beetaloo) and Kulumindini (Elliott), Northern Territory, Australia

    Bibliography

    P Raymond, P Dixon, S Dixon, R Dixon, J Dixon, E Dixon, M Raymond, H Dalywaters, J Collins, R Woods, E Peterson-Cooper, Felicity Meakins, R Pensalfini, and G Wightman. 2018. Jingulu and Mudburra plants and animals: Biocultural knowledge of the Jingili and Mudburra people of Murranji, Marlinja, Warranganku (Beetaloo) and Kulumindini (Elliott), Northern Territory, Australia. Batchelor : Batchelor Press.

Hirosi Nakagawa

  • Institution: Tokyo University of Foreign Studies

Abstract: History of tonal interaction across paradigms: new findings from Khoisan tonology

Hirosi Nakagawa is Professor of Phonetics and Linguistics at Tokyo University of Foreign Studies in Japan. He has been working on Kalahari Khoe languages (Khoe-Kwadi family) spoken in Botswana since 1992, particularly those of southwestern Kalahari Khoe, such as G|ui and G||ana. His research focuses on the synchronic and diachronic phonology of these languages, which have typologically rare features. He is currently leading a project of the phonological typology of the Kalahari Basin Area (aka Khoisan) languages, funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

Recent Publications

  1. The aspect system in G|ui: with special reference to postural features

    Bibliography

    Hirosi Nakagawa. 2016. "The aspect system in G|ui: with special reference to postural features." African Study Monograph. 52: 119-134. doi: 10.14989/207691.

  2. ǂHaba lexical tonology

    Bibliography

    Hirosi Nakagawa. 2017. "ǂHaba lexical tonology". In Khoisan Languages and Linguistics, 108-119.

  3. Anthony Traill and the Holistic Approach to Kalahari Basin Sound Design

    Bibliography

    Tom Güldemann, and Hirosi Nakagawa. 2018. "Anthony Traill and the Holistic Approach to Kalahari Basin Sound Design." Africana Linguistica. 24: 45-73. doi: 10.2143/AL.24.0.3285491.

Jakelin Troy

Jakelin Troy

  • Institution: University of Syndey

Jakelin Troy is a Ngarigu woman from the Snowy Mountains of New South Wales, and Director of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research at The University of Sydney. Professor Troy’s research and academic interests focus on languages, particularly endangered Aboriginal and ‘contact languages’, language education, linguistics, anthropology and visual arts. She has extensive experience developing curriculum for Australian schools, focusing on Australian language programs. She studied in Mexico and Japan, developing her interest in those countries’ art, culture and languages. Professor Troy is Editor in Chief of ab-Original: Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations and First Peoples’ Cultures.

Nigel Vincent

Nigel Vincent

Abstract: The diachrony of control... and the control of diachrony

Nigel Vincent is Professor Emeritus of General & Romance Linguistics at The University of Manchester. His research interests lie in the history of Latin and the Romance languages, in particular Italian and the dialects of Italy, and in the analysis and formal modelling of the mechanisms of morphosyntactic change within the framework of Lexical-Functional Grammar. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and a Member of the Academia Europaea and a former President of ISHL and of the Philological Society. He has held an Erskine Fellowship at the University of Canterbury (NZ) and visiting posts at the Universities of Copenhagen, Pavia and Rome III.

Mary Walworth

Abstract: Language contact and change on the Ocean(ic) highway

Mary Walworth is the Senior Linguist on the Vanuatu Languages and Lifeways project within the Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. Mary’s research focuses on the evolution and interaction of Oceanic languages, specifically in Polynesia and Vanuatu. Through language documentation and comparison of many understudied languages in these areas, she works to uncover not only historical linguistic relationships but also sociohistorical relationships between the speakers of these languages (contact networks, spheres of exchange and interaction, and population movement).

Recent Publications

  1. Sequence Comparison in Computational Historical Linguistics: Phonetic Alignments and Cognate Detection with LingPy 2.6.

    Bibliography

    Johann-Mattis List, Robert Forkel, Simon Greenhill, Tiago Tresoldi, and Mary Walworth. 2018. "Sequence Comparison in Computational Historical Linguistics: Phonetic Alignments and Cognate Detection with LingPy 2.6.." Journal of Language Evolution.

  • Australian Government
  • The University of Queensland
  • Australian National University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • Western Sydney University